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Thread: TN: Natural Loire SB and a Meursault that escaped PremOx (but stillwasn't good)

  1. #1
    DaleW Guest

    Default TN: Natural Loire SB and a Meursault that escaped PremOx (but stillwasn't good)

    So when I went to Fairway to get supplies for Monday's dinner, I had
    noticed that had morels. Shockingly expensive, but I grabbed about 5
    of the best looking ones (less than a quarter of a pound, cost more
    than 3 pounds of cremini AND a half pound of shiitakes). Seemed a
    waste to put in Monday's coq au vin. So last night Betsy decided to
    make an asparagus/morel/cremini/ tarragon dish, to have with leftover
    chicken and potatoes. I wanted a wine to highlight the morels- Pinot
    Noir is my usual thought, but reds and asparagus aren't my favorite
    combo. Sticking to whites, should it be Sauvignon Blanc to counter the
    spears, or white Burgundy to best complement the morels? I brought up
    one of each and planned to ask opinions online,but mowing got in the
    way. She said let's have a glass on front porch before dinner, and I
    opened:

    2006 Claude Courtois/Les Cailloux du Paradis "Quartz"
    I found this more interesting than tasty for the first glass. Some
    Radikon-esque oxidative meets orange peel notes. Baked apple, nuts,
    mineral. I like the mineral notes but overall a little clunky and
    austere. Doesn't taste very Sauvignon-ish to me, I decide not to serve
    with dinner. A glass after dinner shows better, still minerally but
    with a fresher fruit palate. Still, for $24 SB I'd want a bit more
    pleasure through entire bottle. More than half is left, we'll see what
    it is like, but as I think this is low sulphur not expecting much. In
    the end a B.

    1996 Doudet-Naudin "Les Terres Blanches*" Meursault *
    Figured this was a good time to open this, if it was oxidized I could
    fall back on the Courtois. Well, the good news was this escaped
    PremOx, there were some light oxidative notes presenting themselves as
    nutty/butterscotchy, but that's not at all premature in a 13 year old
    village wine. The bad news is that while the wine hadn't succumbed, I
    found I didn't really care, not a lot of there there. Not as much acid
    as most '96s, just rather flat apple juice with a little chalky note.
    A nice night and we lingered on back patio, but still more than half a
    bottle left. Maybe better drunk young, but I suspect just never a very
    interesting wine. C+

    The morels deserved better.
    At least half a bottle of each left, will check in tonight, but I
    think the drain will claim these if Betsy doesn't need for cooking
    next couple nights,

    Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
    wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
    drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
    promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.
    *


  2. #2
    Godzilla Monster Guest

    Default Re: TN: Natural Loire SB and a Meursault that escaped PremOx (butstillwasn't good)

    On Wed, 20 May 2009 08:38:43 -0700, DaleW wrote:

    > So when I went to Fairway to get supplies for Monday's dinner, I had
    > noticed that had morels. Shockingly expensive, but I grabbed about 5 of
    > the best looking ones (less than a quarter of a pound, cost more than 3
    > pounds of cremini AND a half pound of shiitakes). Seemed a waste to put
    > in Monday's coq au vin. So last night Betsy decided to make an
    > asparagus/morel/cremini/ tarragon dish, to have with leftover chicken
    > and potatoes. I wanted a wine to highlight the morels- Pinot Noir is my
    > usual thought, but reds and asparagus aren't my favorite combo. Sticking
    > to whites, should it be Sauvignon Blanc to counter the spears, or white
    > Burgundy to best complement the morels? I brought up one of each and
    > planned to ask opinions online,but mowing got in the way. She said let's
    > have a glass on front porch before dinner, and I opened:
    >
    > 2006 Claude Courtois/Les Cailloux du Paradis "Quartz" I found this more
    > interesting than tasty for the first glass. Some Radikon-esque oxidative
    > meets orange peel notes. Baked apple, nuts, mineral. I like the mineral
    > notes but overall a little clunky and austere. Doesn't taste very
    > Sauvignon-ish to me, I decide not to serve with dinner. A glass after
    > dinner shows better, still minerally but with a fresher fruit palate.
    > Still, for $24 SB I'd want a bit more pleasure through entire bottle.
    > More than half is left, we'll see what it is like, but as I think this
    > is low sulphur not expecting much. In the end a B.
    >
    > 1996 Doudet-Naudin "Les Terres Blanches┬*" Meursault Figured this was a
    > good time to open this, if it was oxidized I could fall back on the
    > Courtois. Well, the good news was this escaped PremOx, there were some
    > light oxidative notes presenting themselves as nutty/butterscotchy, but
    > that's not at all premature in a 13 year old village wine. The bad news
    > is that while the wine hadn't succumbed, I found I didn't really care,
    > not a lot of there there. Not as much acid as most '96s, just rather
    > flat apple juice with a little chalky note. A nice night and we lingered
    > on back patio, but still more than half a bottle left. Maybe better
    > drunk young, but I suspect just never a very interesting wine. C+
    >
    > The morels deserved better.
    > At least half a bottle of each left, will check in tonight, but I think
    > the drain will claim these if Betsy doesn't need for cooking next couple
    > nights,
    >
    > Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
    > wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't drink
    > at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no promises of
    > objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.


    Ah, I am reminded of "the good old days" when I used to go down to the
    wholesale produce market in Los Angeles in the dark of morning to purchase
    a pound of Pfiferlinge at quite reasonable prices. :-)

    Godzilla

  3. #3
    Anders T°rneskog Guest

    Default Re: TN: Natural Loire SB and a Meursault that escaped PremOx (but still wasn't good)


    "Godzilla Monster" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:6b39d$4a146088$cf9b1b3b$[email protected]..
    > Ah, I am reminded of "the good old days" when I used to go down to the
    > wholesale produce market in Los Angeles in the dark of morning to purchase
    > a pound of Pfiferlinge at quite reasonable prices. :-)
    >
    > Godzilla


    Would that be Pfefferlinge, German for chanterels?
    I pick those right outside :-)

    Anders



  4. #4
    Godzilla Monster Guest

    Default Re: TN: Natural Loire SB and a Meursault that escaped PremOx (butstillwasn't good)

    On Wed, 20 May 2009 23:10:40 +0200, Anders T├Şrneskog wrote:

    > "Godzilla Monster" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    > news:6b39d$4a146088$cf9b1b3b$[email protected]..
    >> Ah, I am reminded of "the good old days" when I used to go down to the
    >> wholesale produce market in Los Angeles in the dark of morning to
    >> purchase a pound of Pfiferlinge at quite reasonable prices. :-)
    >>
    >> Godzilla

    >
    > Would that be Pfefferlinge, German for chanterels? I pick those right
    > outside :-)
    >
    > Anders


    That would be correct. Spelling has never been the strong suit for us
    Texans. ;-)

    Godzilla

  5. #5
    DaleW Guest

    Default Re: TN: Natural Loire SB and a Meursault that escaped PremOx (butstill wasn't good)

    On May 20, 3:56*pm, Godzilla Monster <mons...@creatures.org> wrote:
    > On Wed, 20 May 2009 08:38:43 -0700, DaleW wrote:
    > > So when I went to Fairway to get supplies for Monday's dinner, I had
    > > noticed that had morels. Shockingly expensive, but I grabbed about 5 of
    > > the best looking ones (less than a quarter of a pound, cost more than 3
    > > pounds of cremini AND a half pound of shiitakes). Seemed a waste to put
    > > in Monday's coq au vin. So last night Betsy decided to make an
    > > asparagus/morel/cremini/ tarragon dish, to have with leftover chicken
    > > and potatoes. I wanted a wine to highlight the morels- Pinot Noir is my
    > > usual thought, but reds and asparagus aren't my favorite combo. Sticking
    > > to whites, should it be Sauvignon Blanc to counter the spears, or white
    > > Burgundy to best complement the morels? I brought up one of each and
    > > planned to ask opinions online,but mowing got in the way. She said let's
    > > have a glass on front porch before dinner, and I opened:

    >
    > > 2006 Claude Courtois/Les Cailloux du Paradis *"Quartz" I found this more
    > > interesting than tasty for the first glass. Some Radikon-esque oxidative
    > > meets orange peel notes. Baked apple, nuts, mineral. I like the mineral
    > > notes but overall a little clunky and austere. Doesn't taste very
    > > Sauvignon-ish to me, I decide not to serve with dinner. A glass after
    > > dinner shows better, still minerally but with a fresher fruit palate.
    > > Still, for $24 SB I'd want a bit more pleasure through entire bottle.
    > > More than half is left, we'll see what it is like, but as I think this
    > > is low sulphur not expecting much. In the end a B.

    >
    > > 1996 Doudet-Naudin "Les Terres Blanches*" Meursault Figured this was a
    > > good time to open this, if it was oxidized I could fall back on the
    > > Courtois. Well, the good news was this escaped PremOx, there were some
    > > light oxidative notes presenting themselves as nutty/butterscotchy, but
    > > that's not at all premature in a 13 year old village wine. The bad news
    > > is that while the wine hadn't succumbed, I found I didn't really care,
    > > not a lot of there there. Not as much acid as most '96s, just rather
    > > flat apple juice with a little chalky note. A nice night and we lingered
    > > on back patio, but still more than half a bottle left. Maybe better
    > > drunk young, but I suspect just never a very interesting wine. C+

    >
    > > The morels deserved better.
    > > At least half a bottle of each left, will check in tonight, but I think
    > > the drain will claim these if Betsy doesn't need for cooking next couple
    > > nights,

    >
    > > Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
    > > wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't drink
    > > at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no promises of
    > > objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.

    >
    > Ah, I am reminded of "the good old days" when I used to go down to the
    > wholesale produce market in Los Angeles in the dark of morning to purchase
    > a pound of Pfiferlinge at quite reasonable prices. :-)
    >
    > Godzilla


    Some friends have a secret girasole/Chanterelle spot. I always try and
    remember to invite them for dinner around then,,,,,

    By day 2 Courtois showed quite sherried, the Meursault actually held
    up better, though it was still uninteresting.

  6. #6
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: TN: Natural Loire SB and a Meursault that escaped PremOx (butstill wasn't good)

    DaleW wrote:

    > Some friends have a secret girasole/Chanterelle spot. I always try and
    > remember to invite them for dinner around then,,,,,
    >


    Girasole? I thought that referred to sunflowers? Also, what
    constitutes "shockingly expensive" for morels? Around these parts, a
    large (1 qt) container of morels sells for ~$30 in season. My
    mycophagous friend SFJoe tells me that we get a different species of
    morel here, but still that's what it costs around here.

    Side note: Curiously, this year we went directly from getting morels
    from TN/KY to getting them from MI, completely bypassing the local
    product. In most years, I can forage in some friends' forests and get
    10-12 good looking morels, but this year -- perhaps because of a very
    rainy April -- we didn't seem to get many. Strange...

    Mark Lipton

    --
    alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net

  7. #7
    DaleW Guest

    Default Re: TN: Natural Loire SB and a Meursault that escaped PremOx (butstill wasn't good)

    On May 21, 12:17*pm, Mark Lipton <not...@eudrup.ude> wrote:
    > DaleW wrote:
    > > Some friends have a secret girasole/Chanterelle spot. I always try and
    > > remember to invite them for dinner around then,,,,,

    >
    > Girasole? *I thought that referred to sunflowers? *Also, what
    > constitutes "shockingly expensive" for morels? *Around these parts, a
    > large (1 qt) container of morels sells for ~$30 in season. *My
    > mycophagous friend SFJoe tells me that we get a different species of
    > morel here, but still that's what it costs around here.
    >
    > Side note: Curiously, this year we went directly from getting morels
    > from TN/KY to getting them from MI, completely bypassing the local
    > product. *In most years, I can forage in some friends' forests and get
    > 10-12 good looking morels, but this year -- perhaps because of a very
    > rainy April -- we didn't seem to get many. *Strange...
    >
    > Mark Lipton
    >
    > --
    > alt.food.wine FAQ: *http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


    Oops, girolle.
    Are you ready- $69.96/lb. 5 morels, about $12.
    I can buy a pound for $25-35 on line, but shipping is about $30.
    Mostly we use dried.


  8. #8
    Bi!! Guest

    Default Re: TN: Natural Loire SB and a Meursault that escaped PremOx (butstill wasn't good)

    On May 21, 12:17´┐Żpm, Mark Lipton <not...@eudrup.ude> wrote:
    > DaleW wrote:
    > > Some friends have a secret girasole/Chanterelle spot. I always try and
    > > remember to invite them for dinner around then,,,,,

    >
    > Girasole? ´┐ŻI thought that referred to sunflowers? ´┐ŻAlso, what
    > constitutes "shockingly expensive" for morels? ´┐ŻAround these parts, a
    > large (1 qt) container of morels sells for ~$30 in season. ´┐ŻMy
    > mycophagous friend SFJoe tells me that we get a different species of
    > morel here, but still that's what it costs around here.
    >
    > Side note: Curiously, this year we went directly from getting morels
    > from TN/KY to getting them from MI, completely bypassing the local
    > product. ´┐ŻIn most years, I can forage in some friends' forests and get
    > 10-12 good looking morels, but this year -- perhaps because of a very
    > rainy April -- we didn't seem to get many. ´┐ŻStrange...
    >
    > Mark Lipton
    >
    > --
    > alt.food.wine FAQ: ´┐Żhttp://winefaq.cwdjr.net


    I had a good year this year finding as many as 30-40 at a time. We
    picked a lot of grey's early then blacks and dog peckers. Not many
    yellows this year.

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