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Thread: TN: Cali, Burg, Loire, and Bierzo

  1. #1
    DaleW Guest

    Default TN: Cali, Burg, Loire, and Bierzo

    With fried calamari, lemon, and mushroom over salad, the 2009 Francois Cotat “Les Monts Damnes” Sancerre. Big, full, ripe, yet with enough acids to keep it lively. Sure this will age, but I’m drinking them too fast. B+

    Saturday Betsy’s mom came to NY for a week, I was in charge of dinner- made a Moroccan chicken stew, couscous, and braised cabbage in wine, with the 2010 Lafouge “la Chappele” Auxey-Duresses 1er. Fresh, some tannins but not harsh, clean acid, red fruit with rocks and earth. B+ with A- potential

    There was also the 2010 Brezo (Bierzo) used partially for cooking wine. This is Dona Blanco (new grape to me) and Godello. Full, long, somewhat fleshy fruit. I liked, but think I’ll stick to the slightly cheaper Benanza Godello. B

    Sunday was teriyaki salmon, rice, grilled trumpet mushroom, red cabbage with wine and nutmeg, and the 2005 Arcadian “Fiddlestix” Pinot Noir. Goodacids, full black cherry fruit, slightly raspy tannins, a little clipped on finish. Smooths out with air (and seems to lengthen), but never love this. . I think this might well be a bit shut down, but this was only botlte so I’ll never know. B-

    Monday Betsy’s sister took their mom with her to opera, we had a quick dinner of hiyayakko, veggie stirfry, and sauteed arugula, but no wine as I was going to a tasting. Tuesday AM I made a cheaters cassoulet- 45 minutes of active time- tarbais in a pressure cooker, meanwhile brown some pork, lamb shanks, duck/armagnac and lamb merguez sausages in duck fat, combine all with confit leg and some liquids in a slow cooker. OK, they won’t make memayor of Toulouse, but pretty tasty for our dinner. Served with a watercress salad and the 2000 Edmunds St John “Wylie-Fenaughty” Syrah. Much better than a previous bottle which I suspected was off- dark fruit, bacon/meat, medium bodied with a long finish. Some spice and smoke. Drinking quite well. B+/A-

    The cooking wine was the 2011 Litaud Macon-Vergisson. I’ve liked Litaud before, and generally like citrusy Macon, but this is one note, and that note is lemon. B-

    With lemon sole, baked potato, and broccoli, the 2010 La Tour St. Martin Menetou-Salon. Lots of gooseberry and grapefruit, a little grass, straightforward. B/B-

    Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
    wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't drink ata
    party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no promises of
    objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.

  2. #2
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: TN: Cali, Burg, Loire, and Bierzo

    On 2/28/2013 12:05 PM, DaleW wrote:
    > With fried calamari, lemon, and mushroom over salad, the 2009 Francois Cotat “Les Monts Damnes” Sancerre. Big, full, ripe, yet with enough acids to keep it lively. Sure this will age, but I’m drinking them too fast. B+
    >
    > Saturday Betsy’s mom came to NY for a week, I was in charge of dinner- made a Moroccan chicken stew, couscous, and braised cabbage in wine, with the 2010 Lafouge “la Chappele” Auxey-Duresses 1er. Fresh, some tannins but not harsh, clean acid, red fruit with rocks and earth. B+ with A- potential
    >
    > There was also the 2010 Brezo (Bierzo) used partially for cooking wine. This is Dona Blanco (new grape to me) and Godello. Full, long, somewhat fleshy fruit. I liked, but think I’ll stick to the slightly cheaper Benanza Godello. B
    >
    > Sunday was teriyaki salmon, rice, grilled trumpet mushroom, red cabbage with wine and nutmeg, and the 2005 Arcadian “Fiddlestix” Pinot Noir. Good acids, full black cherry fruit, slightly raspy tannins, a little clipped on finish. Smooths out with air (and seems to lengthen), but never love this. . I think this might well be a bit shut down, but this was only botlte so I’ll never know. B-
    >
    > Monday Betsy’s sister took their mom with her to opera, we had a quick dinner of hiyayakko, veggie stirfry, and sauteed arugula, but no wine as I was going to a tasting. Tuesday AM I made a cheaters cassoulet- 45 minutes of active time- tarbais in a pressure cooker, meanwhile brown some pork, lamb shanks, duck/armagnac and lamb merguez sausages in duck fat, combine all with confit leg and some liquids in a slow cooker. OK, they won’t make me mayor of Toulouse, but pretty tasty for our dinner. Served with a watercress salad and the 2000 Edmunds St John “Wylie-Fenaughty” Syrah. Much better than a previous bottle which I suspected was off- dark fruit, bacon/meat, medium bodied with a long finish. Some spice and smoke. Drinking quite well. B+/A-
    >
    > The cooking wine was the 2011 Litaud Macon-Vergisson. I’ve liked Litaud before, and generally like citrusy Macon, but this is one note, and that note is lemon. B-
    >
    > With lemon sole, baked potato, and broccoli, the 2010 La Tour St. Martin Menetou-Salon. Lots of gooseberry and grapefruit, a little grass, straightforward. B/B-
    >
    > Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
    > wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't drink at a
    > party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no promises of
    > objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.
    >

    Dale, I wonder if you have a recipe for your red cabbage in wine? It
    sounds interesting.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

  3. #3
    lleichtman Guest

    Default Re: TN: Cali, Burg, Loire, and Bierzo

    On Thursday, February 28, 2013 10:05:01 AM UTC-7, DaleW wrote:
    > With fried calamari, lemon, and mushroom over salad, the 2009 Francois Cotat “Les Monts Damnes” Sancerre. Big, full, ripe, yet with enough acidsto keep it lively. Sure this will age, but I’m drinking them too fast. B+
    >
    >
    >
    > Saturday Betsy’s mom came to NY for a week, I was in charge of dinner- made a Moroccan chicken stew, couscous, and braised cabbage in wine, with the 2010 Lafouge “la Chappele” Auxey-Duresses 1er. Fresh, some tannins but not harsh, clean acid, red fruit with rocks and earth. B+ with A- potential
    >
    >
    >
    > There was also the 2010 Brezo (Bierzo) used partially for cooking wine. This is Dona Blanco (new grape to me) and Godello. Full, long, somewhat fleshy fruit. I liked, but think I’ll stick to the slightly cheaper Benanza Godello. B
    >
    >
    >
    > Sunday was teriyaki salmon, rice, grilled trumpet mushroom, red cabbage with wine and nutmeg, and the 2005 Arcadian “Fiddlestix” Pinot Noir. Good acids, full black cherry fruit, slightly raspy tannins, a little clipped on finish. Smooths out with air (and seems to lengthen), but never love this. . I think this might well be a bit shut down, but this was only botlteso I’ll never know. B-
    >
    >
    >
    > Monday Betsy’s sister took their mom with her to opera, we had a quick dinner of hiyayakko, veggie stirfry, and sauteed arugula, but no wine as I was going to a tasting. Tuesday AM I made a cheaters cassoulet- 45 minutesof active time- tarbais in a pressure cooker, meanwhile brown some pork, lamb shanks, duck/armagnac and lamb merguez sausages in duck fat, combine all with confit leg and some liquids in a slow cooker. OK, they won’t make me mayor of Toulouse, but pretty tasty for our dinner. Served with a watercress salad and the 2000 Edmunds St John “Wylie-Fenaughty” Syrah. Much better than a previous bottle which I suspected was off- dark fruit, bacon/meat, medium bodied with a long finish. Some spice and smoke. Drinking quite well. B+/A-
    >
    >
    >
    > The cooking wine was the 2011 Litaud Macon-Vergisson. I’ve liked Litaudbefore, and generally like citrusy Macon, but this is one note, and that note is lemon. B-
    >
    >
    >
    > With lemon sole, baked potato, and broccoli, the 2010 La Tour St. Martin Menetou-Salon. Lots of gooseberry and grapefruit, a little grass, straightforward. B/B-
    >
    >
    >
    > Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
    >
    > wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't drink at a
    >
    > party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no promises of
    >
    > objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.


    Godello has been a go to grape varietal for us as of late. The Benanza is agood buy.

  4. #4
    DaleW Guest

    Default Re: TN: Cali, Burg, Loire, and Bierzo

    On Thursday, February 28, 2013 1:05:09 PM UTC-5, James Silverton wrote:
    >
    > Dale, I wonder if you have a recipe for your red cabbage in wine? It
    >
    > sounds interesting.
    >

    It's from Bittman's Everything cookbook

    Braised Cabbage with Wine and Nutmeg (from “How to Cook Everything” by Mark Bittman)

    2 tablespoons olive oil or butter
    1 head cabbage, preferably Savoy, about 1 ½ pounds, cored and shredded
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
    ½ cup white wine
    1 teaspoon brown sugar
    ¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
    Place the olive oil or butter in a large, deep skillet that can later be covered, over medium heat. Add the cabbage and stir until it begins to brown, about 5 minutes.

    Add salt and pepper, then the wine; let the wine bubble away for a few moments, then add the sugar and nutmeg. Cover and simmer until tender, about 15 minutes. Check the seasoning and serve.

    I left out the brown sugar (and used red not Savoy, was in "empty the fridge" mode

  5. #5
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: TN: Cali, Burg, Loire, and Bierzo

    On 2/28/2013 4:11 PM, DaleW wrote:
    > On Thursday, February 28, 2013 1:05:09 PM UTC-5, James Silverton wrote:
    >>
    >> Dale, I wonder if you have a recipe for your red cabbage in wine? It
    >>
    >> sounds interesting.
    >>

    > It's from Bittman's Everything cookbook
    >
    > Braised Cabbage with Wine and Nutmeg (from “How to Cook Everything” by Mark Bittman)
    >
    > 2 tablespoons olive oil or butter
    > 1 head cabbage, preferably Savoy, about 1 ½ pounds, cored and shredded
    > Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
    > ½ cup white wine
    > 1 teaspoon brown sugar
    > ¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
    > Place the olive oil or butter in a large, deep skillet that can later be covered, over medium heat. Add the cabbage and stir until it begins to brown, about 5 minutes.
    >
    > Add salt and pepper, then the wine; let the wine bubble away for a few moments, then add the sugar and nutmeg. Cover and simmer until tender, about 15 minutes. Check the seasoning and serve.
    >
    > I left out the brown sugar (and used red not Savoy, was in "empty the fridge" mode
    >

    Thanks indeed; I'm going to try it and I'll buy some red cabbage tomorrow.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

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