Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: TN: Bdx, Beaujolais, and MSR

  1. #1
    DaleW Guest

    Default TN: Bdx, Beaujolais, and MSR

    Dinner last night was duck ragu over pasta, with spinach and the 2009
    Clos de la Roillete (Coudert) Fleurie. Regular version (I've already
    tried CT), served way too cold initially (passive cellar). As it warms
    a lovely midbodied Gamay,floral, black cherry fruit, full, good
    length. Even better on night 2. A sure buy again- a tad less
    structured than the CT, but still deep and "serious." B+/A-

    Also tried the 2009 St Urbans Hof Ockfener Bockstein Riesling
    Kabinett. White and citrus fruits, as previously noted by Joe more
    Spatlese weight and sweetness, but good length, and a distinct slatey
    mineral note on finish. Nice length, I'll get a few more at $15. B+

    Tonight wings in a soy/honey/pepper glaze, julienned snowpeas with
    onion and sesame oil (thanks Robin!), and brown rice with furikake.
    The wings were from a recent Food and Wine, which suggested "supple
    blackberry-rich Merlot," specifically a CA one. Seemed a stretch to
    me, but I decided sometimes it's good to try outside one's comfort
    zone. I didn't have a CA Merlot handy, but chose a supple Bordeaux
    Merlot, the 2000 La Fleur du Bouard (Lalande de Pomerol). Decanted
    (very little sediment), sweet black plum and raspberry, smoke, coffee.
    Soft mostly resolved tannins. A pretty good modern styled Bordeaux,
    but I can't say that cellaring brought any real improvement- change,
    yes (in form of resolving tannins), but nothing that justifies
    cellaring 7 or 8 years. My strategy for modernista Bordeaux continues
    to evolve towards drink young. B/B+

    As to the match, I think supple Merlot is a terrible choice. I liked
    the wings enough to say Betsy should do again, but next time my
    choices would be (in order) rose sparkling, just off dry Riesling, or
    dry rose.

    Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
    wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
    drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
    promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.*

  2. #2
    Bi!! Guest

    Default Re: TN: Bdx, Beaujolais, and MSR

    On Jan 15, 10:37*pm, DaleW <Dwmi...@aol.com> wrote:
    > Dinner last night was duck ragu over pasta, with spinach and the 2009
    > Clos de la Roillete (Coudert) Fleurie. Regular version (I've already
    > tried CT), served way too cold initially (passive cellar). As it warms
    > a lovely midbodied Gamay,floral, black cherry fruit, full, good
    > length. Even better on night 2. A sure buy again- a tad less
    > structured than the CT, but still deep and "serious." B+/A-
    >
    > Also tried the 2009 St Urbans Hof Ockfener Bockstein Riesling
    > Kabinett. White and citrus fruits, as previously noted by Joe more
    > Spatlese weight and sweetness, but good length, and a distinct slatey
    > mineral note on finish. Nice length, I'll get *a few more at $15. B+
    >
    > Tonight wings in a soy/honey/pepper glaze, julienned snowpeas with
    > onion and sesame oil (thanks Robin!), and brown rice with furikake.
    > The wings were from a recent Food and Wine, which suggested "supple
    > blackberry-rich Merlot," specifically a CA one. Seemed a stretch to
    > me, but I decided sometimes it's good to try outside one's comfort
    > zone. I didn't have a CA Merlot handy, but chose a supple Bordeaux
    > Merlot, the 2000 La Fleur du Bouard (Lalande de Pomerol). Decanted
    > (very little sediment), sweet black plum and raspberry, smoke, coffee.
    > Soft mostly resolved tannins. A pretty good modern styled Bordeaux,
    > but I can't say that cellaring brought any real improvement- change,
    > yes (in form of resolving tannins), but nothing that justifies
    > cellaring 7 or 8 years. My strategy for modernista Bordeaux continues
    > to evolve towards drink young. B/B+
    >
    > As to the match, I think supple Merlot is a terrible choice. I liked
    > the wings enough to say Betsy should do again, but next time my
    > choices would be (in order) rose sparkling, just off dry Riesling, or
    > dry rose.
    >
    > Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
    > wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
    > drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
    > promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.*


    Quite frankly I don't think food writers know squat about wines these
    days and I never take their recommendations.

  3. #3
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: TN: Bdx, Beaujolais, and MSR

    Bi!! wrote:
    > On Jan 15, 10:37 pm, DaleW <Dwmi...@aol.com> wrote:
    >> Dinner last night was duck ragu over pasta, with spinach and the 2009
    >> Clos de la Roillete (Coudert) Fleurie. Regular version (I've already
    >> tried CT), served way too cold initially (passive cellar). As it warms
    >> a lovely midbodied Gamay,floral, black cherry fruit, full, good
    >> length. Even better on night 2. A sure buy again- a tad less
    >> structured than the CT, but still deep and "serious." B+/A-
    >>
    >> Also tried the 2009 St Urbans Hof Ockfener Bockstein Riesling
    >> Kabinett. White and citrus fruits, as previously noted by Joe more
    >> Spatlese weight and sweetness, but good length, and a distinct slatey
    >> mineral note on finish. Nice length, I'll get a few more at $15. B+
    >>
    >> Tonight wings in a soy/honey/pepper glaze, julienned snowpeas with
    >> onion and sesame oil (thanks Robin!), and brown rice with furikake.
    >> The wings were from a recent Food and Wine, which suggested "supple
    >> blackberry-rich Merlot," specifically a CA one. Seemed a stretch to
    >> me, but I decided sometimes it's good to try outside one's comfort
    >> zone. I didn't have a CA Merlot handy, but chose a supple Bordeaux
    >> Merlot, the 2000 La Fleur du Bouard (Lalande de Pomerol). Decanted
    >> (very little sediment), sweet black plum and raspberry, smoke, coffee.
    >> Soft mostly resolved tannins. A pretty good modern styled Bordeaux,
    >> but I can't say that cellaring brought any real improvement- change,
    >> yes (in form of resolving tannins), but nothing that justifies
    >> cellaring 7 or 8 years. My strategy for modernista Bordeaux continues
    >> to evolve towards drink young. B/B+
    >>
    >> As to the match, I think supple Merlot is a terrible choice. I liked
    >> the wings enough to say Betsy should do again, but next time my
    >> choices would be (in order) rose sparkling, just off dry Riesling, or
    >> dry rose.
    >>
    >> Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
    >> wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
    >> drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
    >> promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.

    >
    > Quite frankly I don't think food writers know squat about wines these
    > days and I never take their recommendations.


    I'll go one step further, Bill: I think that most restaurants' wine
    pairing recommendations aren't worth the ink it took to print them. I
    can't begin to count the times that I've seen fairly delicate, subtly
    flavored dishes paired with oaky, OTT CalChards or spicy ethnic foods
    paired with CalCabs. It seems to be about moving the more expensive
    wines rather than any real philosophy. Residents of NYC, Chicago, SF or
    LA will likely have better experiences, though.

    Mark Lipton

    p.s. Dale: no surprises with the Coudert and SUH Kab, but good to hear
    about the '00 Fleur de BoŘard. I have one bottle (purchased in NYC IIRC
    the day after dining at your house back in '03 or whatever) and have
    wondering when/if to open it. I won't have it with wings, though ;-)

  4. #4
    DaleW Guest

    Default Re: TN: Bdx, Beaujolais, and MSR

    On Jan 16, 3:25*pm, Mark Lipton <not...@eudrup.ude> wrote:
    > Bi!! wrote:
    > > On Jan 15, 10:37 pm, DaleW <Dwmi...@aol.com> wrote:
    > >> Dinner last night was duck ragu over pasta, with spinach and the 2009
    > >> Clos de la Roillete (Coudert) Fleurie. Regular version (I've already
    > >> tried CT), served way too cold initially (passive cellar). As it warms
    > >> a lovely midbodied Gamay,floral, black cherry fruit, full, good
    > >> length. Even better on night 2. A sure buy again- a tad less
    > >> structured than the CT, but still deep and "serious." B+/A-

    >
    > >> Also tried the 2009 St Urbans Hof Ockfener Bockstein Riesling
    > >> Kabinett. White and citrus fruits, as previously noted by Joe more
    > >> Spatlese weight and sweetness, but good length, and a distinct slatey
    > >> mineral note on finish. Nice length, I'll get *a few more at $15. B+

    >
    > >> Tonight wings in a soy/honey/pepper glaze, julienned snowpeas with
    > >> onion and sesame oil (thanks Robin!), and brown rice with furikake.
    > >> The wings were from a recent Food and Wine, which suggested "supple
    > >> blackberry-rich Merlot," specifically a CA one. Seemed a stretch to
    > >> me, but I decided sometimes it's good to try outside one's comfort
    > >> zone. I didn't have a CA Merlot handy, but chose a supple Bordeaux
    > >> Merlot, the 2000 La Fleur du Bouard (Lalande de Pomerol). Decanted
    > >> (very little sediment), sweet black plum and raspberry, smoke, coffee.
    > >> Soft mostly resolved tannins. A pretty good modern styled Bordeaux,
    > >> but I can't say that cellaring brought any real improvement- change,
    > >> yes (in form of resolving tannins), but nothing that justifies
    > >> cellaring 7 or 8 years. My strategy for modernista Bordeaux continues
    > >> to evolve towards drink young. B/B+

    >
    > >> As to the match, I think supple Merlot is a terrible choice. I liked
    > >> the wings enough to say Betsy should do again, but next time my
    > >> choices would be (in order) rose sparkling, just off dry Riesling, or
    > >> dry rose.

    >
    > >> Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
    > >> wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
    > >> drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
    > >> promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.

    >
    > > Quite frankly I don't think food writers know squat about wines these
    > > days and I never take their recommendations.

    >
    > I'll go one step further, Bill: I think that most restaurants' wine
    > pairing recommendations aren't worth the ink it took to print them. *I
    > can't begin to count the times that I've seen fairly delicate, subtly
    > flavored dishes paired with oaky, OTT CalChards or spicy ethnic foods
    > paired with CalCabs. *It seems to be about moving the more expensive
    > wines rather than any real philosophy. *Residents of NYC, Chicago, SF or
    > LA will likely have better experiences, though.
    >
    > Mark Lipton
    >
    > p.s. Dale: no surprises with the Coudert and SUH Kab, but good to hear
    > about the '00 Fleur de Bo ard. *I have one bottle (purchased in NYC IIRC
    > the day after dining at your house back in '03 or whatever) and have
    > wondering when/if to open it. I won't have *it with wings, though ;-)


    I agree that often mag recs are a bit lacking, but I also like to
    sometimes challenge my own preconceptions (if only, as in this case,
    to say "aha I was right"). Helped to have the Kab in reserve.

    I will say that this issue of F&W had some interesting pairings in a
    section of "edgy wines" - I think veal with a Gravner or Radikon, and
    a Tondonia rosado with a seafood salad, both seemed unconventional but
    promising.

    Not many restaurants I go to have listed matches. I've thought
    sommelier pairings have ranged from great (Manresa and Convivio) to ho-
    hum.



  5. #5
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: TN: Bdx, Beaujolais, and MSR

    On 1/17/11 9:30 AM, DaleW wrote:

    > Not many restaurants I go to have listed matches. I've thought
    > sommelier pairings have ranged from great (Manresa and Convivio) to ho-
    > hum.


    Even sommelier pairings can be hit or miss in my experience, though a
    good sommelier usually comes up with something of interest. At the top
    of the heap for me were the pairings at El Celler de Can Roca in Girona,
    Spain, where the Roca brother in charge of wines came up with unusual
    pairings from Spain and Germany. (If Levi Dalton was your sommelier at
    Convivio, I'm certain he did the same with Italy) Most often, though,
    Jean and I are getting different foods so we end up eschewing the
    pairings and going with a single bottle (or two half bottles when
    possible) and then it's a conversation with a sommelier.

    Mark Lipton

    --
    alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net

  6. #6
    Bi!! Guest

    Default Re: TN: Bdx, Beaujolais, and MSR

    On Jan 18, 10:09*am, Mark Lipton <not...@eudrup.ude> wrote:
    > On 1/17/11 9:30 AM, DaleW wrote:
    >
    > > Not many restaurants I go to have listed matches. I've thought
    > > sommelier pairings have ranged from great (Manresa and Convivio) to ho-
    > > hum.

    >
    > Even sommelier pairings can be hit or miss in my experience, though a
    > good sommelier usually comes up with something of interest. *At the top
    > of the heap for me were the pairings at El Celler de Can Roca in Girona,
    > Spain, where the Roca brother in charge of wines came up with unusual
    > pairings from Spain and Germany. *(If Levi Dalton was your sommelier at
    > Convivio, I'm certain he did the same with Italy) *Most often, though,
    > Jean and I are getting different foods so we end up eschewing the
    > pairings and going with a single bottle (or two half bottles when
    > possible) and then it's a conversation with a sommelier.
    >
    > Mark Lipton
    >
    > --
    > alt.food.wine FAQ: *http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


    We do the same basic thing. Often a glass of a sparkler if it's not a
    gouge. Being in the wine distribution business made it hard to enjoy
    wines in restaurants when you would sell a bottle to a restaurant for
    $3.66 and see it offered at $8 per glass....kinda takes the fun out of
    it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32