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Thread: Santa Fe Quickie Roundup

  1. #1
    Ed Rasimus Guest

    Default Santa Fe Quickie Roundup

    Four days in Santa Fe and I return broke, sated and relaxed.

    Stayed at Inn of the Anasazi and it has gotten better over the years
    if that is possible. Staff is incredible and the facility is simply
    beautiful.

    Dinner Night 1: At the Anasazi. Service was attentive and working hard
    but seemed fragmented and disjointed. Dinner, however, was excellent.
    Wine was a winner for me because I'm fanatical about saturated fruit
    bombs and Australian Shiraz. Torbreck "The Struie" 2006. Absolutely
    rolls your socks down.

    Breakfast at Cafe Pasqual. Good, but not as great as last time I was
    there.

    Dinner Night 2: Chef Eric Destefano is still hitting home runs at the
    rejuvenated Coyote Cafe. This may be the premium stop in town these
    days and that is a hard title to gain. Wine was Sutcliffe Vineyards
    Syrah from Cortez Colorado. Slow to open up, but after about an hour
    near the end of the meal it was showing fully. This is one that seems
    to have been offered in the restaurant more for its local linkage than
    its readiness to drink. It probably will be really good in a year or
    two.

    Brunch at La Boca, authentic Spanish tapas with a fruity Spanish white
    that I had never heard of before and unfortunately can't recall at the
    moment. Curses!

    Dinner Night 3: Ristra. A remodeled old house on Agua Fria about four
    blocks of Paseo de Peralta. Beautiful whether you dine inside or out.
    We chose al fresco and didn't regret it. Service was wonderful and
    appetizer was absolutely to die for. Foie Gras on a bed of raspberry
    couli with blackberry sauce garnish. Main course failed, however. A
    pan-roasted halibut with almond crust and black olive polenta. Dry and
    distinctly over-cooked. Wine was a 2008 Sancerre and even that
    couldn't cover the entree. Still, the service and remainder makes this
    worth a return visit.

    Lunch at The Shed. Simply a great reminder of why New Mexican
    traditional Mexican food is vastly superior to Tex-Mex.

    Dinner Night 4: Galisteo Bistro per recommendation right here in AFW.
    Definitely a winner. Small, so reservations are a must. Dedicated
    staff and a creative menu that breaks the Santa Fe molds with heavy
    influences of Italian, Spanish and Greek cooking. Once again I went
    with a local wine since a range of varietals from the producer were
    featured on the menu. Milagro Vineyards of Corrales NM. A very nice
    Cabernet Franc, full bodied with loads of black currant flavor, a hint
    of spice and a long finish. I watched another table go through several
    bottles of the Milagro Cabernet Sauvignon with gusto. All the red
    wines served at Galisteo were decanted in Reidel "handle" decanters
    which was very nice touch.

    Now back to the diet...

    Oh, but next month there is an excursion to Dallas where I'll get to
    experience Dean Fearing (formerly from the Mansion at Turtle Creek),
    Stephen Pyle and Nabu at the Hilton Anatole. That should leave me
    bankrupt for the remainder of the year.

  2. #2
    Anders TÝrneskog Guest

    Default Re: Santa Fe Quickie Roundup

    Funny, seems impossible for US citizens to learn that it's "Riedel"....
    To us on the other side of the pond the pronunciation is radically different
    (would be Reedel vs Ridel)

    :-) Anders

    "Ed Rasimus" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:[email protected]..
    > Four days in Santa Fe and I return broke, sated and relaxed.
    >
    > Stayed at Inn of the Anasazi and it has gotten better over the years
    > if that is possible. Staff is incredible and the facility is simply
    > beautiful.
    >
    > Dinner Night 1: At the Anasazi. Service was attentive and working hard
    > but seemed fragmented and disjointed. Dinner, however, was excellent.
    > Wine was a winner for me because I'm fanatical about saturated fruit
    > bombs and Australian Shiraz. Torbreck "The Struie" 2006. Absolutely
    > rolls your socks down.
    >
    > Breakfast at Cafe Pasqual. Good, but not as great as last time I was
    > there.
    >
    > Dinner Night 2: Chef Eric Destefano is still hitting home runs at the
    > rejuvenated Coyote Cafe. This may be the premium stop in town these
    > days and that is a hard title to gain. Wine was Sutcliffe Vineyards
    > Syrah from Cortez Colorado. Slow to open up, but after about an hour
    > near the end of the meal it was showing fully. This is one that seems
    > to have been offered in the restaurant more for its local linkage than
    > its readiness to drink. It probably will be really good in a year or
    > two.
    >
    > Brunch at La Boca, authentic Spanish tapas with a fruity Spanish white
    > that I had never heard of before and unfortunately can't recall at the
    > moment. Curses!
    >
    > Dinner Night 3: Ristra. A remodeled old house on Agua Fria about four
    > blocks of Paseo de Peralta. Beautiful whether you dine inside or out.
    > We chose al fresco and didn't regret it. Service was wonderful and
    > appetizer was absolutely to die for. Foie Gras on a bed of raspberry
    > couli with blackberry sauce garnish. Main course failed, however. A
    > pan-roasted halibut with almond crust and black olive polenta. Dry and
    > distinctly over-cooked. Wine was a 2008 Sancerre and even that
    > couldn't cover the entree. Still, the service and remainder makes this
    > worth a return visit.
    >
    > Lunch at The Shed. Simply a great reminder of why New Mexican
    > traditional Mexican food is vastly superior to Tex-Mex.
    >
    > Dinner Night 4: Galisteo Bistro per recommendation right here in AFW.
    > Definitely a winner. Small, so reservations are a must. Dedicated
    > staff and a creative menu that breaks the Santa Fe molds with heavy
    > influences of Italian, Spanish and Greek cooking. Once again I went
    > with a local wine since a range of varietals from the producer were
    > featured on the menu. Milagro Vineyards of Corrales NM. A very nice
    > Cabernet Franc, full bodied with loads of black currant flavor, a hint
    > of spice and a long finish. I watched another table go through several
    > bottles of the Milagro Cabernet Sauvignon with gusto. All the red
    > wines served at Galisteo were decanted in Reidel "handle" decanters
    > which was very nice touch.
    >
    > Now back to the diet...
    >
    > Oh, but next month there is an excursion to Dallas where I'll get to
    > experience Dean Fearing (formerly from the Mansion at Turtle Creek),
    > Stephen Pyle and Nabu at the Hilton Anatole. That should leave me
    > bankrupt for the remainder of the year.




  3. #3
    susan leichtman Guest

    Default Re: Santa Fe Quickie Roundup

    On Jun 18, 12:42*pm, Ed Rasimus <rasimusSPAML...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > Four days in Santa Fe and I return broke, sated and relaxed.
    >
    > Stayed at Inn of the Anasazi and it has gotten better over the years
    > if that is possible. Staff is incredible and the facility is simply
    > beautiful.
    >
    > Dinner Night 1: At the Anasazi. Service was attentive and working hard
    > but seemed fragmented and disjointed. Dinner, however, was excellent.
    > Wine was a winner for me because I'm fanatical about saturated fruit
    > bombs and Australian Shiraz. Torbreck "The Struie" 2006. Absolutely
    > rolls your socks down.
    >
    > Breakfast at Cafe Pasqual. Good, but not as great as last time I was
    > there.
    >
    > Dinner Night 2: Chef Eric Destefano is still hitting home runs at the
    > rejuvenated Coyote Cafe. This may be the premium stop in town these
    > days and that is a hard title to gain. Wine was Sutcliffe Vineyards
    > Syrah from Cortez Colorado. Slow to open up, but after about an hour
    > near the end of the meal it was showing fully. This is one that seems
    > to have been offered in the restaurant more for its local linkage than
    > its readiness to drink. It probably will be really good in a year or
    > two.
    >
    > Brunch at La Boca, authentic Spanish tapas with a fruity Spanish white
    > that I had never heard of before and unfortunately can't recall at the
    > moment. Curses!
    >
    > Dinner Night 3: Ristra. A remodeled old house on Agua Fria about four
    > blocks of Paseo de Peralta. Beautiful whether you dine inside or out.
    > We chose al fresco and didn't regret it. Service was wonderful and
    > appetizer was absolutely to die for. Foie Gras on a bed of raspberry
    > couli with blackberry sauce garnish. Main course failed, however. A
    > pan-roasted halibut with almond crust and black olive polenta. Dry and
    > distinctly over-cooked. Wine was a 2008 Sancerre and even that
    > couldn't cover the entree. Still, the service and remainder makes this
    > worth a return visit.
    >
    > Lunch at The Shed. Simply a great reminder of why New Mexican
    > traditional Mexican food is vastly superior to Tex-Mex.
    >
    > Dinner Night 4: Galisteo Bistro per recommendation right here in AFW.
    > Definitely a winner. Small, so reservations are a must. Dedicated
    > staff and a creative menu that breaks the Santa Fe molds with heavy
    > influences of Italian, Spanish and Greek cooking. Once again I went
    > with a local wine since a range of varietals from the producer were
    > featured on the menu. Milagro Vineyards of Corrales NM. A very nice
    > Cabernet Franc, full bodied with loads of black currant flavor, a hint
    > of spice and a long finish. I watched another table go through several
    > bottles of the Milagro Cabernet Sauvignon with gusto. All the red
    > wines served at Galisteo were decanted in Reidel "handle" decanters
    > which was very nice touch.
    >
    > Now back to the diet...
    >
    > Oh, but next month there is an excursion to Dallas where I'll get to
    > experience Dean Fearing (formerly from the Mansion at Turtle Creek),
    > Stephen Pyle and Nabu at the Hilton Anatole. That should leave me
    > bankrupt for the remainder of the year.


    Glad you like our fair city. Told you couldn't go wrong with Gallisteo
    Bistro. Coyote and its sister Geronimo are hitting on all cylinders.
    Was Eric at the grille?

  4. #4
    Ken Blake Guest

    Default Re: Santa Fe Quickie Roundup

    On Sat, 18 Jun 2011 22:19:49 +0200, "Anders TŘrneskog"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Funny, seems impossible for US citizens to learn that it's "Riedel"....
    > To us on the other side of the pond the pronunciation is radically different
    > (would be Reedel vs Ridel)



    I'm a US citizen, and I spell it correctly--"Riedel." And I also
    pronounce it correctly, to rhyme with "needle." ;-)

    --
    Ken Blake

  5. #5
    Ed Rasimus Guest

    Default Re: Santa Fe Quickie Roundup

    On Sat, 18 Jun 2011 22:19:49 +0200, "Anders TÝrneskog"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Funny, seems impossible for US citizens to learn that it's "Riedel"....
    >To us on the other side of the pond the pronunciation is radically different
    >(would be Reedel vs Ridel)
    >
    >:-) Anders


    Argghhh! The rule drummed into us in our earliest school years is "i
    before e, except after c or when sounded as "a" as in neighbor and
    weigh."

    I always think I'm being right in remembering to invert the rule when
    referring to the glassware. Now, I'll have to revert to basics.

    Next project, work on Spiegelau....

  6. #6
    Ed Rasimus Guest

    Default Re: Santa Fe Quickie Roundup

    On Sat, 18 Jun 2011 13:36:46 -0700 (PDT), susan leichtman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Jun 18, 12:42*pm, Ed Rasimus <rasimusSPAML...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> Four days in Santa Fe and I return broke, sated and relaxed.
    >>
    >> Stayed at Inn of the Anasazi and it has gotten better over the years
    >> if that is possible. Staff is incredible and the facility is simply
    >> beautiful.
    >>
    >> Dinner Night 1: At the Anasazi. Service was attentive and working hard
    >> but seemed fragmented and disjointed. Dinner, however, was excellent.
    >> Wine was a winner for me because I'm fanatical about saturated fruit
    >> bombs and Australian Shiraz. Torbreck "The Struie" 2006. Absolutely
    >> rolls your socks down.
    >>
    >> Breakfast at Cafe Pasqual. Good, but not as great as last time I was
    >> there.
    >>
    >> Dinner Night 2: Chef Eric Destefano is still hitting home runs at the
    >> rejuvenated Coyote Cafe. This may be the premium stop in town these
    >> days and that is a hard title to gain. Wine was Sutcliffe Vineyards
    >> Syrah from Cortez Colorado. Slow to open up, but after about an hour
    >> near the end of the meal it was showing fully. This is one that seems
    >> to have been offered in the restaurant more for its local linkage than
    >> its readiness to drink. It probably will be really good in a year or
    >> two.
    >>
    >> Brunch at La Boca, authentic Spanish tapas with a fruity Spanish white
    >> that I had never heard of before and unfortunately can't recall at the
    >> moment. Curses!
    >>
    >> Dinner Night 3: Ristra. A remodeled old house on Agua Fria about four
    >> blocks of Paseo de Peralta. Beautiful whether you dine inside or out.
    >> We chose al fresco and didn't regret it. Service was wonderful and
    >> appetizer was absolutely to die for. Foie Gras on a bed of raspberry
    >> couli with blackberry sauce garnish. Main course failed, however. A
    >> pan-roasted halibut with almond crust and black olive polenta. Dry and
    >> distinctly over-cooked. Wine was a 2008 Sancerre and even that
    >> couldn't cover the entree. Still, the service and remainder makes this
    >> worth a return visit.
    >>
    >> Lunch at The Shed. Simply a great reminder of why New Mexican
    >> traditional Mexican food is vastly superior to Tex-Mex.
    >>
    >> Dinner Night 4: Galisteo Bistro per recommendation right here in AFW.
    >> Definitely a winner. Small, so reservations are a must. Dedicated
    >> staff and a creative menu that breaks the Santa Fe molds with heavy
    >> influences of Italian, Spanish and Greek cooking. Once again I went
    >> with a local wine since a range of varietals from the producer were
    >> featured on the menu. Milagro Vineyards of Corrales NM. A very nice
    >> Cabernet Franc, full bodied with loads of black currant flavor, a hint
    >> of spice and a long finish. I watched another table go through several
    >> bottles of the Milagro Cabernet Sauvignon with gusto. All the red
    >> wines served at Galisteo were decanted in Reidel "handle" decanters
    >> which was very nice touch.
    >>
    >> Now back to the diet...
    >>
    >> Oh, but next month there is an excursion to Dallas where I'll get to
    >> experience Dean Fearing (formerly from the Mansion at Turtle Creek),
    >> Stephen Pyle and Nabu at the Hilton Anatole. That should leave me
    >> bankrupt for the remainder of the year.

    >
    >Glad you like our fair city. Told you couldn't go wrong with Gallisteo
    >Bistro. Coyote and its sister Geronimo are hitting on all cylinders.
    >Was Eric at the grille?


    No, the big guy apparently either stayed home or was on Canyon Road.

  7. #7
    Ken Blake Guest

    Default Re: Santa Fe Quickie Roundup

    On Sat, 18 Jun 2011 15:58:45 -0500, Ed Rasimus
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 18 Jun 2011 22:19:49 +0200, "Anders TÝrneskog"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Funny, seems impossible for US citizens to learn that it's "Riedel"....
    > >To us on the other side of the pond the pronunciation is radically different
    > >(would be Reedel vs Ridel)
    > >
    > >:-) Anders

    >
    > Argghhh! The rule drummed into us in our earliest school years is "i
    > before e, except after c or when sounded as "a" as in neighbor and
    > weigh."
    >
    > I always think I'm being right in remembering to invert the rule when
    > referring to the glassware. Now, I'll have to revert to basics.



    It was *many* years ago, but I studied German in college. I still
    remember the rule to pronounce the combination of i and e like the
    *second* letter in the combination. If you remember the spelling and
    pronunciation of "Einstein" and know the German Spelling and
    Pronunciation of Vienna (Wien, pronounced Veen), just follow those as
    examples.

    Also, it's not German, but it's close--the Norwegian composer Grieg is
    an example of ie being pronounce ee.


    --
    Ken Blake

  8. #8
    Anders TÝrneskog Guest

    Default Re: Pronunciation, was Santa Fe Quickie Roundup


    "Ken Blake" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 18 Jun 2011 15:58:45 -0500>
    > Also, it's not German, but it's close--the Norwegian composer Grieg is
    > an example of ie being pronounce ee.


    Correct, but not the other way around in Norwegian, - the female name Heidi
    would be 'H-e-ee-di', the wovels pronounced separately. The e stressed and
    short, the ee unstressed and short.

    :-) Anders



  9. #9
    Ed Rasimus Guest

    Default Re: Pronunciation, was Santa Fe Quickie Roundup

    On Sun, 19 Jun 2011 14:25:10 +0200, "Anders TÝrneskog"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Ken Blake" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Sat, 18 Jun 2011 15:58:45 -0500>
    >> Also, it's not German, but it's close--the Norwegian composer Grieg is
    >> an example of ie being pronounce ee.

    >
    >Correct, but not the other way around in Norwegian, - the female name Heidi
    >would be 'H-e-ee-di', the wovels pronounced separately. The e stressed and
    >short, the ee unstressed and short.
    >
    >:-) Anders
    >


    Hahah. Two years ago my first book, "When Thunder Rolled" was
    translated and published in Finnish. That's the only foreign language
    translation that's been done and I surmise that is because someone
    thought my last name was Finn. It isn't. It derives from Lithuanian.

    I joked with the author when I saw the final product that I needed to
    "buy a vowel" to go with the mass of double consonants. He replied
    that when letters were auctioned off, the Czechs bought up all the
    vowels and the Finns got what was left.

    (The translator was a Finnish AF helicopter pilot and we had a lot of
    great email exchanges in the process.)

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