Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Re: tannic and acidic

  1. #1
    DaleW Guest

    Default Re: tannic and acidic

    Again Steve is pretty on-target.
    If drinking a high tannin wine young, I tend to want it with rare marbled meat.

    Where are you located, someone should be able to recommend wines you can find to compare acidity. A pretty stark contrast would be something like Trimbach's basic Riesling with a Kendall Jackson Chardonnay. Obviously different grapes, oak treatments, etc but if you ignore flavors and concentrate on how sharp they come across, should give you a pretty good clue.

  2. #2
    RichD Guest

    Default Re: tannic and acidic

    On Feb 5, DaleW <Dwmi...@aol.com> wrote:
    > Again Steve is pretty on-target.
    > If drinking a high tannin wine young, I tend to want it with rare
    > marbled meat.
    >
    > Where are you located, someone should be able to
    > recommend wines you can find to compare acidity. A pretty
    > stark contrast would be something like Trimbach's basic
    > Riesling with a Kendall Jackson Chardonnay.


    Vintage?

    > Obviously different grapes, oak treatments, etc but if you
    > ignore flavors and concentrate on how sharp they come
    > across, should give you a pretty good clue.


    ok thanks.

    Can you comment further on this oak business?
    "the wine is very oaky" is another one I don't get.

    --
    Rich

  3. #3
    Doug Anderson Guest

    Default Re: tannic and acidic

    RichD <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Feb 5, DaleW <Dwmi...@aol.com> wrote:
    > > Again Steve is pretty on-target.
    > > If drinking a high tannin wine young, I tend to want it with rare
    > > marbled meat.
    > >
    > > Where are you located, someone should be able to
    > > recommend wines you can find to compare acidity. A pretty
    > > stark contrast would be something like Trimbach's basic
    > > Riesling with a Kendall Jackson Chardonnay.

    >
    > Vintage?


    Any vintage. And Trimbach is just a (good) example. Other Alsatian
    Rieslings will also usually be relatively acid. So will most New
    Zealand Sauvignon Blancs.

    > > Obviously different grapes, oak treatments, etc but if you
    > > ignore flavors and concentrate on how sharp they come
    > > across, should give you a pretty good clue.

    >
    > ok thanks.
    >
    > Can you comment further on this oak business?
    > "the wine is very oaky" is another one I don't get.


    The flavor comes from the oak barrels that many wines are made in.
    Not all wines made in oak barrels taste oaky though - the barrels
    have a much stronger effect on the wine when the barrels are new.

    Most Napa and Sonoma Chardonnays are oaky. By contrast, most white
    burgundies (same grape used) are not oaky.

    Kendall-Jackson Chardonnay is widely available in the US, reasonably
    priced, and you can taste the oak. Jadot Pouilly-Fuisse is a widely
    available (in the US) whie burgundy which will not be oaky (or at
    least much less oaky).

    Maybe other people have better example to contrast.

  4. #4
    Mike Tommasi Guest

    Default Re: tannic and acidic

    On 2/7/2011 7:06 AM, Doug Anderson wrote:
    > And Trimbach is just a (good) example. Other Alsatian
    > Rieslings will also usually be relatively acid.


    Perceived acidity or actual acid content irrespective of sugar?
    Either way I don't understand the statement.

  5. #5
    Doug Anderson Guest

    Default Re: tannic and acidic

    Mike Tommasi <[email protected]> writes:

    > On 2/7/2011 7:06 AM, Doug Anderson wrote:
    > > And Trimbach is just a (good) example. Other Alsatian
    > > Rieslings will also usually be relatively acid.

    >
    > Perceived acidity or actual acid content irrespective of sugar?
    > Either way I don't understand the statement.


    I suppose I mean my perception of acidity. Which is certainly
    influenced by the sweetness level some, but that influence is
    ameliorated somewhat by having drunk plenty of sweet wines with too
    little acidity to support the sugar, and others with plenty of acidity
    to balance the sugar.

    My experience with Alsatian Riesling (much more limited than yours,
    I'm quite sure) is that a good acid level is the norm, and that
    usually the sweetness level is low enough to make that apparent.

    I'm happy to be corrected if that's wrong.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32