Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: La Mano Mencia Roble

  1. #1
    Godzilla Monster Guest

    Default La Mano Mencia Roble

    The general rule in the Spanish language is that nouns ending in "O" are
    masculine, and those ending in "A" are feminine. But, there are
    exceptions to every rule, albeit not as many as in the Bastard tongue
    which is known as English. Therefore, La Mano ("La" being the feminine
    article) is quite correct.

    Last night, I celebrated the onslaught of a cooler spell but making:
    Le filet de porc, casserole a rôti avec Basil, vin rouge. La casserole
    deglaze avec un vin plus rouge. Servi avec le riz basmati et les fleurons
    de broccoli.

    Depending upon one's viewpoint, using up three quarters of a cup of this
    wine in the dish was either good or bad. For the dish, it was good;
    For the wine drinkers, it left less to enjoy, which is bad.

    It is only recently that we have begun to see more wines from
    Northwestern Spain, where the Mencia grape is grown. This n/v bottle
    practically leapt out of the bottle with a powerful fruity nose, usually
    the arbiter of a light body. This one however, was syrupy, jammy, and a
    little brambly and spicy to boot. Deep ripe cherries and a little of the
    three month immersion in oak could be detected. The morning after, I feel
    like burying my own proboscis in the remnants of the bottle, the nose
    being so powerful and lingering.

    It may sound like I am paranoid, but I'll wager that there won't be any
    more left by the time that I return to Costco next week.:-( A solid 16.

    Godzilla

  2. #2
    Mike Tommasi Guest

    Default Re: La Mano Mencia Roble

    Godzilla Monster wrote:
    > The general rule in the Spanish language is that nouns ending in "O" are
    > masculine, and those ending in "A" are feminine. But, there are
    > exceptions to every rule, albeit not as many as in the Bastard tongue
    > which is known as English. Therefore, La Mano ("La" being the feminine
    > article) is quite correct.


    Not sure about why this preamble was necessary, had somebody tried to
    tell you it should be El Mano? :-)

    > Last night, I celebrated the onslaught of a cooler spell but making:
    > Le filet de porc, casserole a rôti avec Basil, vin rouge. La casserole
    > deglaze avec un vin plus rouge. Servi avec le riz basmati et les fleurons
    > de broccoli.


    Your spanish articles are fine, but your use of the definite article in
    français is eccentric... reminds me of the ads for Boursin as they
    sponsor drama and crime programmes on UK TV - "Le marriage breaker", "Le
    murder weapon", followed of course by the final "Du Pain, Du Vin, Du
    Boursin"

    > It is only recently that we have begun to see more wines from
    > Northwestern Spain, where the Mencia grape is grown.


    While we are on the subject of Spanish nitpicking, The Menc*a grape
    typical of the Duero valley, but also found in Galicia, is pronounced
    with the accent on the I - "men-thee-ah" with unvoiced "th" as in "theme".

    cheers


    --
    Mike Tommasi - Six Fours, France
    email link http://www.tommasi.org/mymail

  3. #3
    Godzilla Monster Guest

    Default Re: La Mano Mencia Roble

    On Sat, 10 Jan 2009 19:43:59 +0100, Mike Tommasi wrote:

    > Godzilla Monster wrote:
    >> The general rule in the Spanish language is that nouns ending in "O"
    >> are masculine, and those ending in "A" are feminine. But, there are
    >> exceptions to every rule, albeit not as many as in the Bastard tongue
    >> which is known as English. Therefore, La Mano ("La" being the feminine
    >> article) is quite correct.

    >
    > Not sure about why this preamble was necessary, had somebody tried to
    > tell you it should be El Mano? :-)
    >
    >> Last night, I celebrated the onslaught of a cooler spell but making: Le
    >> filet de porc, casserole a rôti avec Basil, vin rouge. La casserole
    >> deglaze avec un vin plus rouge. Servi avec le riz basmati et les
    >> fleurons de broccoli.

    >
    > Your spanish articles are fine, but your use of the definite article in
    > français is eccentric... reminds me of the ads for Boursin as they
    > sponsor drama and crime programmes on UK TV - "Le marriage breaker", "Le
    > murder weapon", followed of course by the final "Du Pain, Du Vin, Du
    > Boursin"
    >
    >> It is only recently that we have begun to see more wines from
    >> Northwestern Spain, where the Mencia grape is grown.

    >
    > While we are on the subject of Spanish nitpicking, The Menc*a grape
    > typical of the Duero valley, but also found in Galicia, is pronounced
    > with the accent on the I - "men-thee-ah" with unvoiced "th" as in
    > "theme".
    >
    > cheers


    You caught me with my French translating website down. ;-)
    I have studied Spanish, but not French. I have yet to figure out why my
    favorite Mexican Beer - Negra Modelo does not agree in gender.

    It matters not how straight the gate, or how starved with punishment it
    may seem --- I would like more of this wine, but am not optimistic.

    Godzilla

  4. #4
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: La Mano Mencia Roble

    Godzilla Monster wrote:

    > It is only recently that we have begun to see more wines from
    > Northwestern Spain, where the Mencia grape is grown. This n/v bottle
    > practically leapt out of the bottle with a powerful fruity nose, usually
    > the arbiter of a light body. This one however, was syrupy, jammy, and a
    > little brambly and spicy to boot. Deep ripe cherries and a little of the
    > three month immersion in oak could be detected. The morning after, I feel
    > like burying my own proboscis in the remnants of the bottle, the nose
    > being so powerful and lingering.


    Thanks for this note. I have seen La Mano Menc*a (Bierzo) in my local
    wine shop, but had shied away as so many Bierzos are overoaked. I had
    thought that the bottles I saw were labeled 2006, though. I am also
    surprised at your description of it as syrupy and jammy, as Menc*a is
    most often likened to Cab Franc, to which it may be related.

    Mark Lipton

  5. #5
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: La Mano Mencia Roble

    Mike Tommasi wrote:

    > While we are on the subject of Spanish nitpicking, The Menc*a grape
    > typical of the Duero valley, but also found in Galicia, is pronounced
    > with the accent on the I - "men-thee-ah" with unvoiced "th" as in "theme".


    But this wine is from El Bierzo, which is also planted mostly to Menc*a
    as I understand it, and is neither in Galicia or the Duero valley,
    though it is close to both. Or am I mistaken?

    Mark Lipton

  6. #6
    santiago Guest

    Default Re: La Mano Mencia Roble

    Godzilla Monster <[email protected]> wrote in news:252a6$4968f466
    $cf9b1009$[email protected]:
    >
    > You caught me with my French translating website down. ;-)
    > I have studied Spanish, but not French. I have yet to figure out why my
    > favorite Mexican Beer - Negra Modelo does not agree in gender.


    That's easy. "Modelo" is used both for masculin and feminin: "Un modelo"
    and "Una modelo".

    s.

  7. #7
    santiago Guest

    Default Re: La Mano Mencia Roble

    Mark Lipton <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:gkb3ev$f7b$1[email protected]:
    >
    > But this wine is from El Bierzo, which is also planted mostly to
    > Menc*a as I understand it, and is neither in Galicia or the Duero
    > valley, though it is close to both. Or am I mistaken?


    You are right: El Bierzo is a region in the Sil Valley. The Sil river runs
    East to West and joins the Mio at the West of El Bierzo. River Mio is the
    northiest frontier between Spain and Portugal when it reaches the Atlantic
    Ocean.

    I could be wrong, but I do not think there is Menca planted in Ribera del
    Duero.

    I hear your comment that many wines from El Bierzo are overoaked. It was
    not true with the first vintages. But the success has led the wineries to
    have more cash and they decided to employ the surplus in more new barrels,
    when they should have purchased a Porsche Cayenne. I suggest that you look
    for the cheaper bottlings, since those do not usually are soaked in the
    expensive and toasty new barrels.

    BTW, I know that my contributions to this newsgroup are very limited, so I
    want to recommend looking for Dominio Dostares "Cumal" 2004 or 2005. Not
    menca and not really from El Bierzo, but a close place, made with the
    indigenous grape "Prieto Picudo", formerly used for ross. It is a bit
    overoaked for my tastes, but is has a great personality. Really worth the
    effort of finding it.

    http://www.dominiodostares.com/web/eng/vino.php?id=10

    s.


  8. #8
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: La Mano Mencia Roble

    santiago wrote:

    > I hear your comment that many wines from El Bierzo are overoaked. It was
    > not true with the first vintages. But the success has led the wineries to
    > have more cash and they decided to employ the surplus in more new barrels,
    > when they should have purchased a Porsche Cayenne. I suggest that you look
    > for the cheaper bottlings, since those do not usually are soaked in the
    > expensive and toasty new barrels.


    This is, alas, a truism in many regions: the low-priced cuve is
    preferable to the "prestige" bottling which sees 100% new barriques,
    etc. Although my experience with wines from El Bierzo is not extensive,
    I have heard this same thing from people like "Florida Jim" Cowan (who
    you might also know) who really enjoyed the early vintages of the
    Descendientes de Jos Palacios Bierzo (amazing, but true) only to find
    later ones completely marred by new oak.
    >
    > BTW, I know that my contributions to this newsgroup are very limited, so I
    > want to recommend looking for Dominio Dostares "Cumal" 2004 or 2005. Not
    > menca and not really from El Bierzo, but a close place, made with the
    > indigenous grape "Prieto Picudo", formerly used for ross. It is a bit
    > overoaked for my tastes, but is has a great personality. Really worth the
    > effort of finding it.
    >
    > http://www.dominiodostares.com/web/eng/vino.php?id=10


    Thanks!

    Mark Lipton


  9. #9
    santiago Guest

    Default Re: La Mano Mencia Roble

    Mark Lipton <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:gkbuob$g8l$[email protected]:
    >
    > This is, alas, a truism in many regions: the low-priced cuve is
    > preferable to the "prestige" bottling which sees 100% new barriques,
    > etc. Although my experience with wines from El Bierzo is not
    > extensive, I have heard this same thing from people like "Florida Jim"
    > Cowan (who you might also know) who really enjoyed the early vintages
    > of the Descendientes de Jos Palacios Bierzo (amazing, but true) only
    > to find later ones completely marred by new oak.


    That is surprising to me, because I really like the wines from
    Descendientes de J. Palacios. In fact, I have a respect for lvaro Palacios
    because of his use of wood. As you may know, he comes from a saga of
    winemakers (Palacios-Remondo now called Herencia-Remondo in Alfaro, La
    Rioja) and before arriving at Priorat as one of the 5 pioneers, he worked
    as a salesman for a French tonnelier. I have yet to find a wine by lvaro
    Palacios that is overoaked. I have not tasted extensively their upper range
    wines, but I do not think that "Ptalos del Bierzo" (the basic cuve from
    sourced grapes) or "Villa de Corulln" display too much oak.

    s

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32