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Thread: Help! About Baked Ham?

  1. #1
    livefuz Guest

    Default Help! About Baked Ham?


    Have a late inclusion for the Xmas menu............BAKED HAM with a
    Fruity Glaze

    Please Forumites, I need some ideas on what wine would be appropriate to
    accompany this Xmas dish :?:
    Pardon my ignorance, but I'm really at loggerheads as to what would be
    most suitable!




    --
    livefuz

  2. #2
    cwdjrxyz Guest

    Default Re: Help! About Baked Ham?

    On Apr 15, 1:02*am, livefuz <livefuz.60c7d38.198...@foodbanter.com>
    wrote:
    > Have a late inclusion for the Xmas menu............BAKED HAM with a
    > Fruity Glaze
    >
    > Please Forumites, I need some ideas on what wine would be appropriate to
    > accompany this Xmas dish :?:
    > Pardon my ignorance, but I'm really at loggerheads as to what would be
    > most suitable!


    The most suitable wine is what you like, but you might want to
    consider a thing or two. What kind of ham is it? Hams range from very
    mild "city" hams to anything-but-mild country and several long-aged
    classics from Europe and the US. A very mild wine might have much of
    the taste and bouquet masked by a long-aged ham. Next, how sweet is
    the ham with glaze? If the ham is fairly sweet, a very dry wine might
    seem too tart to many when tasted after a taste of the sweet ham. For
    a "city" ham with some sweetness, I likely would select a Riesling
    from Germany or Alsace with a bit of sweetness.For a very strong
    classic ham aged a year or two, I might select a sherry which can be
    had in various levels of sweetness. A Gewurztraminer which can be had
    dry to a bit sweet also might please me for a "city" ham. If you have
    not had the wine before, the sales person may be able to tell you how
    sweet it is and if it is likely to go well with the ham dish. If you
    decide you can tolerate a rather sweet ham dish, consider serving the
    ham with a bit of mustard fruit preserves. These are made in Italy and
    elsewhere. They contain large chunks or whole fruit, and the mustard
    content usually is fairly mild.


  3. #3
    Bi!! Guest

    Default Re: Help! About Baked Ham?

    On Apr 15, 2:06�pm, cwdjrxyz <spamtr...@cwdjr.info> wrote:
    > On Apr 15, 1:02�am, livefuz <livefuz.60c7d38.198...@foodbanter.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > Have a late inclusion for the Xmas menu............BAKED HAM with a
    > > Fruity Glaze

    >
    > > Please Forumites, I need some ideas on what wine would be appropriate to
    > > accompany this Xmas dish :?:
    > > Pardon my ignorance, but I'm really at loggerheads as to what would be
    > > most suitable!

    >
    > The most suitable wine is what you like, but you might want to
    > consider a thing or two. What kind of ham is it? Hams range from very
    > mild "city" hams to anything-but-mild country and several long-aged
    > classics from Europe and the US. A very mild wine might have much of
    > the taste and bouquet masked by a long-aged ham. Next, how sweet is
    > the ham with glaze? If the ham is fairly sweet, a very dry wine might
    > seem too tart to many when tasted after a taste of the sweet ham. For
    > a "city" ham with some sweetness, I likely would select a Riesling
    > from Germany or Alsace with a bit of sweetness.For a very strong
    > classic ham aged a year or two, I might select a sherry which can be
    > had in various levels of sweetness. A Gewurztraminer which can be had
    > dry to a bit sweet also might please me for a "city" ham. If you have
    > not had the wine before, the sales person may be able to tell you how
    > sweet it is and if it is likely to go well with the ham dish. If you
    > decide you can tolerate a rather sweet ham dish, consider serving the
    > ham with a bit of mustard fruit preserves. These are made in Italy and
    > elsewhere. They contain large chunks or whole fruit, and the mustard
    > content usually is fairly mild.


    I like sparkling rose with most ham(s).

  4. #4
    santiago Guest

    Default Re: Help! About Baked Ham?

    cwdjrxyz <[email protected]> wrote in news:6ff10d2b-e281-4343-8d7a-
    [email protected]:

    For a very strong
    > classic ham aged a year or two, I might select a sherry which can be
    > had in various levels of sweetness.


    I really do not know how a baked ham is, since in Spain we tend to prefer
    ham air cured. But the kind of sherries you would serve with meat are
    usually bone dry. Fino and Manzanilla (biological maturing), and
    Amontillado, Oloroso and Palo Cortado are bone dry. Only PX and Cream (a
    mixture of a finished dry sherry with a tad of finished PX) are sweet, but
    we would not serve them before the cheese course.

    That said, I second your recommendation of paying attention to the
    sweetness of the dish.

    s.

  5. #5
    cwdjrxyz Guest

    Default Re: Help! About Baked Ham?

    On Apr 15, 2:21*pm, santiago <m...@privacy.net> wrote:
    > cwdjrxyz <spamtr...@cwdjr.info> wrote in news:6ff10d2b-e281-4343-8d7a-
    > 50011266e...@11g2000yqr.googlegroups.com:
    >
    > For a very strong
    >
    > > classic ham aged a year or two, I might select a sherry which can be
    > > had in various levels of sweetness.

    >
    > I really do not know how a baked ham is, since in Spain we tend to prefer
    > ham air cured. But the kind of sherries you would serve with meat are
    > usually bone dry. Fino and Manzanilla (biological maturing), and
    > Amontillado, Oloroso and Palo Cortado are bone dry. Only PX and Cream (a
    > mixture of a finished dry sherry with a tad of finished PX) are sweet, but
    > we would not serve them before the cheese course.
    >
    > That said, I second your recommendation of paying attention to the
    > sweetness of the dish.


    I am guessing the poster is in the US and is referring to a fruit
    glazed baked ham that is often severed in addition to, or instead of,
    a baked turkey for Christmas. This usually would be a very mild ham
    that may have a bit of smoke, likely is aged only a short time, and
    that is kept very moist and tender. Excess fat is trimmed from the
    whole ham, and fruit such as pineapple, even candied cherries,etc as
    well as whole cloves may be attached to the ham. It is covered with a
    sweet sauce made from fruit juices and slowly baked until done, taking
    care to baste often. Since the sweet sauce will not penetrate very
    far into the interior of the ham, the sweetness of the serving will
    greatly depend on how much of the roasting pan sweet sauce is served
    on top of the ham. Also there may be a sweet side dish such as candied
    sweet potatoes, which can be quite sweet, especially in the hands of a
    Southern cook. This is very different than a strong, long aged,
    Smithfield ham which is more like the styles of famous hams in Italy
    and Spain, for example. Baking one of your Spanish hams made from
    those black pigs that are fattened on a wild acorn diet likely would
    ruin such a ham and be extremely expensive, at least in the US where
    we can now get some of the better Spanish acorn diet hams at a price
    that likely would shock you.

    In the US and UK markets the dry grades of Sherry often have been
    sweetened a bit in the past, and perhaps some still are for the
    cheaper examples of Sherry on the US market. Then there was a
    tradition of California "Sherry" that was legal to sell for a very
    long time, and this tended to be sweeter than a like-named grade of
    Sherry sold in Spain.

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