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Thread: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia

  1. #1
    Dick R. Guest

    Default A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia

    We've escaped the cold and snow (Feb-Mar) in Minnesota for the last
    few years, with our final destination on Hilton Head, South Carolina
    for a month. On our driving trips down and back, we have spent time
    in many wonderful areas. This year one of the highlights was 3 nights
    in Williamsburg, Virginia and an evening "cooking class" at A Chef's
    Kitchen. Hors d'oeuvres with French bubbly, followed by a dinner of
    creamy shallot soup, spinach salad, skillet baked corn bread, pan-seared
    scallops, grilled prime rib, and fresh berry parfait, all paired with
    generous servings of appropriate wines. A truly gastronomically delicious
    experience. We had made reservations in advance so we had front row
    seating. The dinner cost $75 per person (no gratuity expected) and it
    was worth it!
    If anyone visits Williamsburg check out:
    http://achefskitchen.biz/

    Dick and Linda - back in Minnesota just in time for spring.

  2. #2
    Lawrence Leichtman Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dick R." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > We've escaped the cold and snow (Feb-Mar) in Minnesota for the last
    > few years, with our final destination on Hilton Head, South Carolina
    > for a month. On our driving trips down and back, we have spent time
    > in many wonderful areas. This year one of the highlights was 3 nights
    > in Williamsburg, Virginia and an evening "cooking class" at A Chef's
    > Kitchen. Hors d'oeuvres with French bubbly, followed by a dinner of
    > creamy shallot soup, spinach salad, skillet baked corn bread, pan-seared
    > scallops, grilled prime rib, and fresh berry parfait, all paired with
    > generous servings of appropriate wines. A truly gastronomically delicious
    > experience. We had made reservations in advance so we had front row
    > seating. The dinner cost $75 per person (no gratuity expected) and it
    > was worth it!
    > If anyone visits Williamsburg check out:
    > http://achefskitchen.biz/
    >
    > Dick and Linda - back in Minnesota just in time for spring.


    Since this is a wine group, it would be nice to know what the wine
    pairings were.

  3. #3
    Dee Randall Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia


    "Lawrence Leichtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Dick R." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> We've escaped the cold and snow (Feb-Mar) in Minnesota for the last
    >> few years, with our final destination on Hilton Head, South Carolina
    >> for a month. On our driving trips down and back, we have spent time
    >> in many wonderful areas. This year one of the highlights was 3 nights
    >> in Williamsburg, Virginia and an evening "cooking class" at A Chef's
    >> Kitchen. Hors d'oeuvres with French bubbly, followed by a dinner of
    >> creamy shallot soup, spinach salad, skillet baked corn bread, pan-seared
    >> scallops, grilled prime rib, and fresh berry parfait, all paired with
    >> generous servings of appropriate wines. A truly gastronomically delicious
    >> experience. We had made reservations in advance so we had front row
    >> seating. The dinner cost $75 per person (no gratuity expected) and it
    >> was worth it!
    >> If anyone visits Williamsburg check out:
    >> http://achefskitchen.biz/
    >>
    >> Dick and Linda - back in Minnesota just in time for spring.

    >
    > Since this is a wine group, it would be nice to know what the wine
    > pairings were.




    Perhaps they were all Virginia wines?

    Did you have reservations previous to your going to Williamsburg?

    I hope you went to Jamestown, too. 1609. (Yes, before Plymouth Rock. [a
    little history lesson for those in the North.:-)) ]

    Dee Dee






  4. #4
    Dick R. Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia

    Dee Randall wrote:

    > "Lawrence Leichtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>"Dick R." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>We've escaped the cold and snow (Feb-Mar) in Minnesota for the last
    >>>few years, with our final destination on Hilton Head, South Carolina
    >>>for a month. On our driving trips down and back, we have spent time
    >>>in many wonderful areas. This year one of the highlights was 3 nights
    >>>in Williamsburg, Virginia and an evening "cooking class" at A Chef's
    >>>Kitchen. Hors d'oeuvres with French bubbly, followed by a dinner of
    >>>creamy shallot soup, spinach salad, skillet baked corn bread, pan-seared
    >>>scallops, grilled prime rib, and fresh berry parfait, all paired with
    >>>generous servings of appropriate wines. A truly gastronomically delicious
    >>>experience. We had made reservations in advance so we had front row
    >>>seating. The dinner cost $75 per person (no gratuity expected) and it
    >>>was worth it!
    >>>If anyone visits Williamsburg check out:
    >>>http://achefskitchen.biz/
    >>>
    >>>Dick and Linda - back in Minnesota just in time for spring.

    >>
    >>Since this is a wine group, it would be nice to know what the wine
    >>pairings were.

    >
    >
    > Perhaps they were all Virginia wines?
    >
    > Did you have reservations previous to your going to Williamsburg?
    >
    > I hope you went to Jamestown, too. 1609. (Yes, before Plymouth Rock. [a
    > little history lesson for those in the North.:-)) ]
    >
    > Dee Dee
    >

    Hi Larry and Dee,
    I can't remember many details about specific wines, but their idea is to serve
    great food with good wines in the $10 range. They also sell the wines they
    serve, and I did purchase a couple of bottles. With the hors d'oeuvres they
    served Charles De Fere Brut ($13) and that was pretty good so I purchased a
    bottle. I also purchased another bottle that has already gotten lost in my
    cellar, so I don't know what it is. Otherwise, as I recall, they served
    Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet. No Virginia wines, but we had
    already sampled and purchased a few bottles when we visited Barboursville
    Vinyards in Charlottesville. We did make reservations several weeks in
    advance, so we had front row seating.

    We visited Jamestown - both the reconstruction and the actual archaeological
    dig - and purchased a book by the lead archaeologist William Kelso. We also
    learned that the "love affair" between John Smith and Pocahontas was very
    unlikely because in 1607 he was 27 and she was 10. Lots of history!

    Dick



  5. #5
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia

    Dee wrote on Sun, 26 Apr 2009 08:43:21 -0400:


    > I hope you went to Jamestown, too. 1609. (Yes, before
    > Plymouth Rock. [a little history lesson for those in the North.:-)) ]


    I live in a state that was settled a bit later than Jamestown or
    Plymouth (and *not* by my ancestors) but I'd like to mention that the
    "Pilgrims" intended to go to Virginia but were prevented by adverse
    winds. There is an unreliable story that they had their map upside down,
    but still!

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  6. #6
    Lawrence Leichtman Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dick R." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >
    > > "Lawrence Leichtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]..
    > >
    > >>In article <[email protected]>,
    > >>"Dick R." <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>We've escaped the cold and snow (Feb-Mar) in Minnesota for the last
    > >>>few years, with our final destination on Hilton Head, South Carolina
    > >>>for a month. On our driving trips down and back, we have spent time
    > >>>in many wonderful areas. This year one of the highlights was 3 nights
    > >>>in Williamsburg, Virginia and an evening "cooking class" at A Chef's
    > >>>Kitchen. Hors d'oeuvres with French bubbly, followed by a dinner of
    > >>>creamy shallot soup, spinach salad, skillet baked corn bread, pan-seared
    > >>>scallops, grilled prime rib, and fresh berry parfait, all paired with
    > >>>generous servings of appropriate wines. A truly gastronomically delicious
    > >>>experience. We had made reservations in advance so we had front row
    > >>>seating. The dinner cost $75 per person (no gratuity expected) and it
    > >>>was worth it!
    > >>>If anyone visits Williamsburg check out:
    > >>>http://achefskitchen.biz/
    > >>>
    > >>>Dick and Linda - back in Minnesota just in time for spring.
    > >>
    > >>Since this is a wine group, it would be nice to know what the wine
    > >>pairings were.

    > >
    > >
    > > Perhaps they were all Virginia wines?
    > >
    > > Did you have reservations previous to your going to Williamsburg?
    > >
    > > I hope you went to Jamestown, too. 1609. (Yes, before Plymouth Rock. [a
    > > little history lesson for those in the North.:-)) ]
    > >
    > > Dee Dee
    > >

    > Hi Larry and Dee,
    > I can't remember many details about specific wines, but their idea is to serve
    > great food with good wines in the $10 range. They also sell the wines they
    > serve, and I did purchase a couple of bottles. With the hors d'oeuvres they
    > served Charles De Fere Brut ($13) and that was pretty good so I purchased a
    > bottle. I also purchased another bottle that has already gotten lost in my
    > cellar, so I don't know what it is. Otherwise, as I recall, they served
    > Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet. No Virginia wines, but we had
    > already sampled and purchased a few bottles when we visited Barboursville
    > Vinyards in Charlottesville. We did make reservations several weeks in
    > advance, so we had front row seating.
    >
    > We visited Jamestown - both the reconstruction and the actual archaeological
    > dig - and purchased a book by the lead archaeologist William Kelso. We also
    > learned that the "love affair" between John Smith and Pocahontas was very
    > unlikely because in 1607 he was 27 and she was 10. Lots of history!
    >
    > Dick


    I have eaten there before but only bought single bottles. Their
    selection under $20 was excellent so I had wondered what you had in the
    pairings. $75 per person with wine is a great deal as their food is to
    notch.

  7. #7
    Dee Randall Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia


    >> We visited Jamestown - both the reconstruction and the actual
    >> archaeological
    >> dig - and purchased a book by the lead archaeologist William Kelso. We
    >> also
    >> learned that the "love affair" between John Smith and Pocahontas was very
    >> unlikely because in 1607 he was 27 and she was 10. Lots of history!
    >>
    >> Dick

    >




    You no doubt saw the "Godspeed," the ship that my direct ancestor came on
    in 1610. He was a carpenter.

    As to the history of John Smith, many have discredited him for his tale
    told in later life. At least we have his own words.

    One of my favorite "History's Mysteries" though is "The Lost Colony"
    http://colonial-america.suite101.com...ony_of_roanoke
    I'm sure you know it.

    I'm glad you visited Virginia.

    Dee Dee
    Virginia, U.S.A.








  8. #8
    Dick R. Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia

    Dee Randall wrote:
    >>>We visited Jamestown - both the reconstruction and the actual
    >>>archaeological
    >>>dig - and purchased a book by the lead archaeologist William Kelso. We
    >>>also
    >>>learned that the "love affair" between John Smith and Pocahontas was very
    >>>unlikely because in 1607 he was 27 and she was 10. Lots of history!
    >>>
    >>>Dick

    >>

    > You no doubt saw the "Godspeed," the ship that my direct ancestor came on
    > in 1610. He was a carpenter.
    >

    Actually, we didn't. The day we spent at the visitor center in Feb was cold and
    windy so we didn't walk out to see the 3 ships.

    > As to the history of John Smith, many have discredited him for his tale
    > told in later life. At least we have his own words.

    Rumor has it that after John Smith returned to England, he liked to write about
    being rescued by young maidens, but I dunno.
    >
    > One of my favorite "History's Mysteries" though is "The Lost Colony"
    > http://colonial-america.suite101.com...ony_of_roanoke
    > I'm sure you know it.

    Don't know it, but it will make for some more fascinating reading. Thanks.
    >
    > I'm glad you visited Virginia.
    >

    We'll be back! I think next year we'll stay on Hilton Head SC in March and
    drive back through Virginia for a re-visit in April. Should be beautiful and
    green by then and we still have many places to see.

    Dick and Linda in MN

  9. #9
    Anders Tørneskog Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia


    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:gt386v$p2k$[email protected]..
    >
    > You no doubt saw the "Godspeed," the ship that my direct ancestor came on
    > in 1610. He was a carpenter.
    >

    Now that caught my attention... 1610? It would have been a sensation, of
    course, but it turns out that the Jamestown ship is a replica built in 1957.
    Another replica was built for the celebrations 2007 I see.

    Back on topic; I've noted that a Virginian attempted growing European vines
    in 1774 - name is Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson whom the locals may have heard
    about.

    :-) Anders



  10. #10
    Mike Tommasi Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia

    Anders Tørneskog wrote:
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    > news:gt386v$p2k$[email protected]..
    >> You no doubt saw the "Godspeed," the ship that my direct ancestor came on
    >> in 1610. He was a carpenter.
    >>

    > Now that caught my attention... 1610? It would have been a sensation, of
    > course, but it turns out that the Jamestown ship is a replica built in 1957.
    > Another replica was built for the celebrations 2007 I see.
    >
    > Back on topic; I've noted that a Virginian attempted growing European vines
    > in 1774 - name is Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson whom the locals may have heard
    > about.


    Vines in America? No, he's the one that invented lightning. :-)



    William Penn had french plants planted by his gardener Andrew Doz in
    1682. Doz accidentally created the first hybrid, it was discovered by
    gardener John Alexander so it got his name but was actually created by Doz.

    In May 1787 Jefferson spent much time in France visiting wineries and
    tasting wines.

    Jefferson allegedly was made to taste some scuppernong in 1819 by a
    member of congress named... Macon!


    --
    Mike Tommasi - Six Fours, France
    email link http://www.tommasi.org/mymail

  11. #11
    Dee Randall Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia


    "Anders Tørneskog" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:49f580aa$0$22055$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    > news:gt386v$p2k$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> You no doubt saw the "Godspeed," the ship that my direct ancestor came
    >> on in 1610. He was a carpenter.
    >>

    > Now that caught my attention... 1610? It would have been a sensation, of
    > course, but it turns out that the Jamestown ship is a replica built in
    > 1957. Another replica was built for the celebrations 2007 I see.
    >


    Shall I mention the ship that my husband's Norweigan ancestors came on?
    Oops, I forgot, they took it back to the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo. LOL!
    Dee Dee




  12. #12
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia

    Mike wrote on Mon, 27 Apr 2009 12:24:35 +0200:

    > Anders Tørneskog wrote:
    >> "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    >> news:gt386v$p2k$[email protected]..
    >>> You no doubt saw the "Godspeed," the ship that my direct
    >>> ancestor came on in 1610. He was a carpenter.
    >>>

    >> Now that caught my attention... 1610? It would have been a
    >> sensation, of course, but it turns out that the Jamestown
    >> ship is a replica built in 1957. Another replica was built
    >> for the celebrations 2007 I see.
    >>
    >> Back on topic; I've noted that a Virginian attempted growing European
    >> vines in 1774 - name is Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson whom the locals
    >> may have heard about.


    > Vines in America? No, he's the one that invented lightning.
    > :-)


    > William Penn had french plants planted by his gardener Andrew Doz in
    > 1682. Doz accidentally created the first hybrid, it was
    > discovered by gardener John Alexander so it got his name but
    > was actually created by Doz.


    > In May 1787 Jefferson spent much time in France visiting
    > wineries and tasting wines.


    > Jefferson allegedly was made to taste some scuppernong in 1819
    > by a member of congress named... Macon!


    The Viking discoverers of N. America called the place Vineland. Eric the
    Red said his German father-in-law swore that they had found grapes.
    There is still argument about that since Eric did not get very far
    south. However, European grapes, Vitis vinifera, can be grown in
    Ontario.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  13. #13
    Anders Tørneskog Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia - Norse wine


    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:gt4hf3$l7p$[email protected]..
    > Mike wrote on Mon, 27 Apr 2009 12:24:35 +0200:
    >
    >
    > The Viking discoverers of N. America called the place Vineland. Eric the
    > Red said his German father-in-law swore that they had found grapes. There
    > is still argument about that since Eric did not get very far south.
    > However, European grapes, Vitis vinifera, can be grown in Ontario.
    >

    Actually, the Norse name was Vinland. The 'Vin' normally translates into
    'grassy meadow' and is found in several Norwegian place names, even Bergen
    (which originally was written 'Bjorgvin').
    Newfoundland certainly qualifies for that descriptor - but Vikings knew
    about wine (written as 'vin' too) and may have coined the name "Wineland" to
    encourage settlement - not in Labrador or Newfoundland - but perhaps in
    Saint Lawrence... The climate was warmer then... But that is speculation
    only.
    Btw I didn't know Eric the Red had a German father-in-law!? He found
    grapes? Then he must have been further south even if Eric was not?
    Anders



  14. #14
    Bi!! Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia - Norse wine

    On Apr 27, 12:10�pm, "Anders T�rneskog" <sredna.goksen...@i2c.ten>
    wrote:
    > "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.net> skrev i meldingnews:gt4hf3$l7p$[email protected]..> Mike �wrote �on Mon, 27 Apr 2009 12:24:35 +0200:
    >
    > > The Viking discoverers of N. America called the place Vineland. Eric the
    > > Red said his German father-in-law swore that they had found grapes. There
    > > is still argument about that since Eric did not get very far south.
    > > However, European grapes, Vitis vinifera, can be grown in Ontario.

    >
    > Actually, the Norse name was Vinland. �The 'Vin' normally translates into
    > 'grassy meadow' and is found in several Norwegian place names, even Bergen
    > (which originally was written 'Bjorgvin').
    > Newfoundland certainly qualifies for that descriptor - but Vikings knew
    > about wine (written as 'vin' too) and may have coined the name "Wineland"to
    > encourage settlement - not in Labrador or Newfoundland - but perhaps in
    > Saint Lawrence... The climate was warmer then... �But that is speculation
    > only.
    > Btw I didn't know Eric the Red had a German father-in-law!? �He found
    > grapes? �Then he must have been further south even if Eric was not?
    > Anders


    My dear Norwiegian friends who visited recently were much more
    interested in cracking open and polishing off the "Linea" Aquavit that
    we had than plundering my wine cellar. I didn't realize that they had
    a hankering for "vin".....:-)

  15. #15
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia - Norse wine

    Anders wrote on Mon, 27 Apr 2009 18:10:11 +0200:


    > "James Silverton" <[email protected]> skrev i
    > melding news:gt4hf3$l7p$1@news.eternal-septem[email protected]..
    >> Mike wrote on Mon, 27 Apr 2009 12:24:35 +0200:
    >>
    >> The Viking discoverers of N. America called the place
    >> Vineland. Eric the Red said his German father-in-law swore
    >> that they had found grapes. There is still argument about
    >> that since Eric did not get very far south. However, European
    >> grapes, Vitis vinifera, can be grown in Ontario.
    >>

    >Btw I didn't know Eric the Red had a German father-in-law!? He found
    >grapes? Then he must have been further south even if Eric was not?


    I got that a bit wrong! According, to Samuel Taylor Morison. "The
    European Discovery of America", a certain Tyrker from Germany who
    discovered the "grapes" is described in the "Tale of the Greenlanders"
    as Leif Ericsson's foster-father. Tyrker had known grapes when he was a
    child. However, grapes are also mentioned in "The Saga of Eric the Red".
    Morison also describes those saga writers who would have made good real
    estate promoters a few years ago.

    Morison tells the tale of Biarni Heriulfson, who failed to discover
    America twice (!)because he was stubbornly looking for Greenland to
    spend the Yule feast with his father and never landed. His story is said
    to have inspired Leif who actually bought Biarni's boat for his own
    expedition.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  16. #16
    Dick R. Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia

    Dee Randall wrote:
    > "Anders Tørneskog" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:49f580aa$0$22055$[email protected]..
    >
    >>"Dee Randall" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    >>news:gt386v$p2k$[email protected]..
    >>
    >>>You no doubt saw the "Godspeed," the ship that my direct ancestor came
    >>>on in 1610. He was a carpenter.
    >>>

    >>Now that caught my attention... 1610? It would have been a sensation, of
    >>course, but it turns out that the Jamestown ship is a replica built in
    >>1957. Another replica was built for the celebrations 2007 I see.
    >>

    > Shall I mention the ship that my husband's Norweigan ancestors came on?
    > Oops, I forgot, they took it back to the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo. LOL!
    > Dee Dee
    >

    I trace my history to when the Swedes and many others arrived in the 1920s.
    My parents arrived separately in the 1920s, and fortunately for me, years later
    they met, married, and voila, here I am! I guess my history is in Sweden,
    but I kind of lost my Swedish accent years ago. I did take a trip back to Sweden
    in the late 1940s aboard the Swedish American Lines Gripsholm, and visited all
    my relatives. I acquired a Swedish accent, and upon my return to Chicago, my
    grade school teacher was very irritated and tried to break me of my accent.
    I could go on and on, but, shut my mouth - even though the original "Americans"
    own casinos. I've said too much, but to keep the post somewhat on topic,
    does anyone have a food/wine paring for aquavit?

    Dick

  17. #17
    Patok Guest

    Default aquavit pairing (was: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia)

    Dick R. wrote:
    > I've said too much, but to keep the post somewhat on topic,
    > does anyone have a food/wine paring for aquavit?


    Wouldn't that be a food/spirits pairing?
    Actually, having never tasted aquavit, what is it like? Is it more like
    vodka, (that is, pure spirits), or more like schnapps/Eau de vie (that
    is, having some defining nose)?
    If it is like vodka, then the traditional Russian pairings of dark
    bread, pickles, fish and caviar would work best. If it is aromatic, then
    the pairing would depend on the prevailing nose. Fruity brandies like
    rakia/slivovitz work best with fresh salads with oil and vinegar
    dressing, for example.

    --
    You'd be crazy to e-mail me with the crazy. But leave the div alone.

  18. #18
    Anders Tørneskog Guest

    Default Re: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia


    "Dick R." <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:[email protected]..
    > does anyone have a food/wine paring for aquavit?
    >

    Pickled herrings and beer is traditional.
    Aquavit and beer also goes well with fatty foods.
    Anders



  19. #19
    Anders Tørneskog Guest

    Default Re: aquavit pairing (was: A dining experience in Williamsburg, Virginia)


    "Patok" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:gt57oj$flr$[email protected]..
    > Actually, having never tasted aquavit, what is it like? Is it more like
    > vodka, (that is, pure spirits), or more like schnapps/Eau de vie (that is,
    > having some defining nose)?

    You are right in both counts :-) (almost)
    There are 2 kinds, blank (often called Taffel) popular in Sweden and Denmark
    and brown (matured in oak casks, often sherry) more common in Norway. Both
    are more or less flavoured, however. Norway tends to use more caraway all
    over, the others employ more of other seeds or herbs like anise, coriander
    (cilantro), dill, fennel and others.
    The Norwegian luxury brand Non Plus Ultra (10 years in casks) approaches a
    good cognac and is savoured in the same way.

    hth
    Anders



  20. #20
    Bi!! Guest

    Default Re: aquavit pairing (was: A dining experience in Williamsburg,Virginia)

    On Apr 27, 6:23�pm, "Anders T�rneskog" <sredna.goksen...@i2c.ten>
    wrote:
    > "Patok" <crazy.div.pa...@gmail.com> skrev i meldingnews:gt57oj$flr$1@news..eternal-september.org...> Actually, having never tasted aquavit, what is it like? Is it more like
    > > vodka, (that is, pure spirits), or more like schnapps/Eau de vie (that is,
    > > having some defining nose)?

    >
    > You are right in both counts :-) (almost)
    > There are 2 kinds, blank (often called Taffel) popular in Sweden and Denmark
    > and brown (matured in oak casks, often sherry) more common in Norway. �Both
    > are more or less flavoured, however. Norway tends to use more caraway all
    > over, the others employ more of other seeds or herbs like anise, coriander
    > (cilantro), dill, fennel and others.
    > The Norwegian luxury brand Non Plus Ultra (10 years in casks) approaches a
    > good cognac and is savoured in the same way.
    >
    > hth
    > Anders


    The "Linea" is dark and has been aged in casks in the bottom holds of
    container ships. Alledgedly, it crosses the equater many times and
    the cooling and heating of the casks by the warm and cod water is
    responsible for the extraction and flavor. It is stronly flavoured
    with carraway so to me it tastes like rye bread. I drink it cold with
    herring and beer.

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