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Thread: Corkage Fees

  1. #1
    Earle Jones Guest

    Default Corkage Fees

    Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    own wine.

    One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
    there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.

    But there is a $15 screwage fee.

    earle
    *

  2. #2
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On 6/1/2011 2:03 PM, Earle Jones wrote:
    > Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    > and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    > own wine.
    >
    > One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
    > there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.
    >
    > But there is a $15 screwage fee.
    >
    > earle
    > *


    Sounds like a very appropriate name!

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  3. #3
    Mateusz Papiernik Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    W dniu 2011-06-01 20:03, Earle Jones pisze:
    > Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    > and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    > own wine.


    I wish our restaurants did the same. I asked once in a very high profile
    restaurant here about a corkage fee, as I wanted a fine Bordeaux
    accompanying the dinner for my family with no success. They never ever
    heard of such a thing and insisted that "nowhere in the world" people
    can bring their own alcohol to the restaurant. Well, sad.



    --
    Mateusz Papiernik
    [email protected], http://www.maticomp.net
    "One man can make a difference" - Wilton Knight

  4. #4
    Anders TÝrneskog Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees


    "Earle Jones" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:[email protected]..
    > Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    > and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    > own wine.
    >
    > One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
    > there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.
    >
    > But there is a $15 screwage fee.
    >
    > earle
    > *

    Fine joke. But - you'll have to consider the cost to the restaurant of
    having glasses, setting the table, clearing it and washing up afterwards.
    15$ then means 3$ per glass...
    Anders.



  5. #5
    lleichtman Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On Jun 1, 12:03*pm, Earle Jones <earle.jo...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    > and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    > own wine.
    >
    > One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. *He also said that
    > there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.
    >
    > But there is a $15 screwage fee.
    >
    > earle
    > *


    I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
    Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
    times retail not wholesale.

  6. #6
    st.helier Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    "lleichtman" wrote in message .....

    >>On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
    >> Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    >> and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    >> own wine.
    >>
    >> One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
    >> there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.
    >>
    >> But there is a $15 screwage fee.

    >
    > I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
    > Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
    > times retail not wholesale.



    ???? Larry, I am confused???
    What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
    Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
    Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
    could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
    while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
    And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!

    --

    st.helier

  7. #7
    Mike Tommasi Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On 02/06/2011 13:49, st.helier wrote:
    > And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!


    Andrew, they are more unionized than... France!

    :-)

    Mike

    (don't let the smiley fool you, in France union membership is under 8%,
    but they do have the power to break the balls of the other 92%)

  8. #8
    lleichtman Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On Jun 2, 5:49*am, "st.helier" <alphabet...@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote:
    > "lleichtman" wrote in message .....
    > >>On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
    > >> Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    > >> and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    > >> own wine.

    >
    > >> One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
    > >> there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.

    >
    > >> But there is a $15 screwage fee.

    >
    > > I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
    > > Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
    > > times retail not wholesale.

    >
    > ???? Larry, I am confused???
    > What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
    > Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
    > Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
    > could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
    > while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
    > And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!
    >
    > --
    >
    > st.helier


    Yep, State law prevents bringing your own bottle to a restaurant.
    Don't know why. I can't get any rational explanation. It protects
    restaurants but allows them to charge ridiculous prices. You can,
    however, walk out of the restaurant with an open bottle you bought!!

  9. #9
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On 6/2/11 7:49 AM, st.helier wrote:

    > ???? Larry, I am confused???
    > What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
    > Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
    > Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
    > could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
    > while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???


    'Tis true, mi-ex-lud. Our Byzantine alcohol legislation, which operates
    on a state-by-state basis courtesy of the 21st Amendment (the repeal of
    Prohibition), does in certain states -- including my own -- forbid the
    consumption of alcohol in restaurants unless said alcohol was sold by
    the restaurant itself. This is done in the guise of liquor licenses,
    which are required before any establishment can legally sell alcohol.
    Got it now? ;-)

    Mark Lipton
    --
    alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net

  10. #10
    Ed Rasimus Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 07:21:14 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Jun 2, 5:49*am, "st.helier" <alphabet...@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote:
    >> "lleichtman" wrote in message .....
    >> >>On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
    >> >> Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    >> >> and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    >> >> own wine.

    >>
    >> >> One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
    >> >> there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.

    >>
    >> >> But there is a $15 screwage fee.

    >>
    >> > I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
    >> > Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
    >> > times retail not wholesale.

    >>
    >> ???? Larry, I am confused???
    >> What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
    >> Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
    >> Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
    >> could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
    >> while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
    >> And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> st.helier

    >
    >Yep, State law prevents bringing your own bottle to a restaurant.
    >Don't know why. I can't get any rational explanation. It protects
    >restaurants but allows them to charge ridiculous prices. You can,
    >however, walk out of the restaurant with an open bottle you bought!!


    Alcohol laws remain largely state-by-state, which can be very good or
    very bad, depending upon the state. Over the last fifty years the
    trend has been favorable and each election more areas go "wet" and
    there is better availability.

    As I recall, when I lived in NM (long ago, galaxy far away), you could
    "brown-bag" beer and wine if a restaurant did not have a liquor
    license. If they did, however, then you had to buy their offerings.
    There also were beer/wine licenses and full-service licenses.

    Total licenses for the state were fixed in number, so to open a new
    facility with a license you had to find a license holder willing to
    sell his license. Made for a very lucrative market and often the
    license was worth multiple times what the entire business was worth.

    Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
    thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
    in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
    into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
    expanding the wet precincts last election.

    Federalism reigns and I still like it better than having the feds
    involved.

  11. #11
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On 6/2/11 11:27 AM, Ed Rasimus wrote:

    > Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
    > thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
    > in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
    > into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
    > expanding the wet precincts last election.


    Alcohol laws in the Bible Belt have traditionally been quite...er...
    interesting. The worst I can recall was found in Oklahoma and later in
    Utah, where there were no bars, only "clubs." In the "club," you'd pay
    for membership for a small fee, which would then entitle you to a locker
    and a glass. You were then free to purchase a BOTTLE of liquor at the
    bar, pour it into your own glass and consume it on the premises. The
    locker was for storing your opened bottle of liquor.

    How this system was supposed to reduce alcohol consumption is beyond me,
    since it encourages consumption by the bottle!

    Mark Lipton
    --
    alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net

  12. #12
    lleichtman Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On Jun 2, 9:27*am, Ed Rasimus <rasimusSPAML...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 07:21:14 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <larryleicht...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >On Jun 2, 5:49 am, "st.helier" <alphabet...@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote:
    > >> "lleichtman" wrote in message .....
    > >> >>On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
    > >> >> Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    > >> >> and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    > >> >> own wine.

    >
    > >> >> One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
    > >> >> there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle..

    >
    > >> >> But there is a $15 screwage fee.

    >
    > >> > I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
    > >> > Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
    > >> > times retail not wholesale.

    >
    > >> ???? Larry, I am confused???
    > >> What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
    > >> Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
    > >> Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
    > >> could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
    > >> while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
    > >> And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!

    >
    > >> --

    >
    > >> st.helier

    >
    > >Yep, State law prevents bringing your own bottle to a restaurant.
    > >Don't know why. I can't get any rational explanation. It protects
    > >restaurants but allows them to charge ridiculous prices. You can,
    > >however, walk out of the restaurant with an open bottle you bought!!

    >
    > Alcohol laws remain largely state-by-state, which can be very good or
    > very bad, depending upon the state. Over the last fifty years the
    > trend has been favorable and each election more areas go "wet" and
    > there is better availability.
    >
    > As I recall, when I lived in NM (long ago, galaxy far away), you could
    > "brown-bag" beer and wine if a restaurant did not have a liquor
    > license. If they did, however, then you had to buy their offerings.
    > There also were beer/wine licenses and full-service licenses.
    >
    > Total licenses for the state were fixed in number, so to open a new
    > facility with a license you had to find a license holder willing to
    > sell his license. Made for a very lucrative market and often the
    > license was worth multiple times what the entire business was worth.
    >
    > Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
    > thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
    > in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
    > into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
    > expanding the wet precincts last election.
    >
    > Federalism reigns and I still like it better than having the feds
    > involved.


    You can no longer brown bag beer or wine to any restaurant liquor
    license or not.

  13. #13
    lleichtman Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On Jun 2, 10:00*am, Mark Lipton <not...@eudrup.ude> wrote:
    > On 6/2/11 11:27 AM, Ed Rasimus wrote:
    >
    > > Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
    > > thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
    > > in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
    > > into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
    > > expanding the wet precincts last election.

    >
    > Alcohol laws in the Bible Belt have traditionally been quite...er...
    > interesting. *The worst I can recall was found in Oklahoma and later in
    > Utah, where there were no bars, only "clubs." *In the "club," you'd pay
    > for membership for a small fee, which would then entitle you to a locker
    > and a glass. *You were then free to purchase a BOTTLE of liquor at the
    > bar, pour it into your own glass and consume it on the premises. *The
    > locker was for storing your opened bottle of liquor.
    >
    > How this system was supposed to reduce alcohol consumption is beyond me,
    > since it encourages consumption by the bottle!
    >
    > Mark Lipton
    > --
    > alt.food.wine FAQ: *http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


    Texas had this even when I was in college. The bars would sell you
    mixers and a glass and you would bring your own liquor that was kept
    on the premises with your name on it. In Lubbock, the whole county was
    dry when I was in med school. So you would drive to the county line to
    buy your liquor, etc. then consume it in the parking lot and drive
    back. Many fatal wrecks on that road so Lubbock decided to go all the
    way so now you can buy beer and wine in the grocery stores. Lubbock
    had more churches than people.

  14. #14
    Ed Rasimus Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On Thu, 02 Jun 2011 12:00:27 -0400, Mark Lipton <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 6/2/11 11:27 AM, Ed Rasimus wrote:
    >
    >> Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
    >> thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
    >> in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
    >> into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
    >> expanding the wet precincts last election.

    >
    >Alcohol laws in the Bible Belt have traditionally been quite...er...
    >interesting. The worst I can recall was found in Oklahoma and later in
    >Utah, where there were no bars, only "clubs." In the "club," you'd pay
    >for membership for a small fee, which would then entitle you to a locker
    >and a glass. You were then free to purchase a BOTTLE of liquor at the
    >bar, pour it into your own glass and consume it on the premises. The
    >locker was for storing your opened bottle of liquor.
    >
    >How this system was supposed to reduce alcohol consumption is beyond me,
    >since it encourages consumption by the bottle!
    >
    >Mark Lipton


    I'll match you and raise.

    Years ago, Universal City TX, Randolph AFB, about 20 Vietnam fighter
    pilots returned and going through a pilot instructor course. All
    gathered in a motel during the training, some with spouses. Friday
    nite, a few drinks by the pool then a suggestion to the local
    restaurant/supper-club.

    Walk down the block and request "table for twelve"

    "Yes sir, would you like the family room or the club room?"

    "What's the difference?"

    "In the club room you can have drink with dinner."

    "OK, we'll take club room."

    "Is anyone a member? No? No problem then simply join."

    "How much is it?"

    "Free! And only one of you needs to join. The rest can be his guests."

    "OK, now we'll eat."

    "Sorry, gentlemen in the club room must have jackets."

    "Well, we obviously don't."

    "No problem. What size are you?" And with that he turned to a wardrobe
    behind him with about fifty of the ugliest sport coats ever made
    awaiting us.

    It was the law in those days.

  15. #15
    Ed Rasimus Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 13:07:06 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Jun 2, 9:27*am, Ed Rasimus <rasimusSPAML...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 07:21:14 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> <larryleicht...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> >On Jun 2, 5:49 am, "st.helier" <alphabet...@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote:
    >> >> "lleichtman" wrote in message .....
    >> >> >>On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
    >> >> >> Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    >> >> >> and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    >> >> >> own wine.

    >>
    >> >> >> One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
    >> >> >> there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.

    >>
    >> >> >> But there is a $15 screwage fee.

    >>
    >> >> > I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
    >> >> > Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
    >> >> > times retail not wholesale.

    >>
    >> >> ???? Larry, I am confused???
    >> >> What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
    >> >> Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
    >> >> Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
    >> >> could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
    >> >> while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
    >> >> And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!

    >>
    >> >> --

    >>
    >> >> st.helier

    >>
    >> >Yep, State law prevents bringing your own bottle to a restaurant.
    >> >Don't know why. I can't get any rational explanation. It protects
    >> >restaurants but allows them to charge ridiculous prices. You can,
    >> >however, walk out of the restaurant with an open bottle you bought!!

    >>
    >> Alcohol laws remain largely state-by-state, which can be very good or
    >> very bad, depending upon the state. Over the last fifty years the
    >> trend has been favorable and each election more areas go "wet" and
    >> there is better availability.
    >>
    >> As I recall, when I lived in NM (long ago, galaxy far away), you could
    >> "brown-bag" beer and wine if a restaurant did not have a liquor
    >> license. If they did, however, then you had to buy their offerings.
    >> There also were beer/wine licenses and full-service licenses.
    >>
    >> Total licenses for the state were fixed in number, so to open a new
    >> facility with a license you had to find a license holder willing to
    >> sell his license. Made for a very lucrative market and often the
    >> license was worth multiple times what the entire business was worth.
    >>
    >> Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
    >> thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
    >> in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
    >> into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
    >> expanding the wet precincts last election.
    >>
    >> Federalism reigns and I still like it better than having the feds
    >> involved.

    >
    >You can no longer brown bag beer or wine to any restaurant liquor
    >license or not.


    Well, I'll be in Santa Fe for a week, in about ten days. Inn of the
    Anasazi and some very fine dining on the agenda. No brown bags in my
    future.

    Skipping the Compound and Geronimo this vist, but will do Anasazi,
    Coyote Cafe (new management last year and back to the glory days!),
    Ristra and 315 Wine Bar.

    Anybody got other favorites?

  16. #16
    Bi!! Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On Jun 2, 4:40*pm, Ed Rasimus <rasimusSPAML...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Thu, 02 Jun 2011 12:00:27 -0400, Mark Lipton <not...@eudrup.ude>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >On 6/2/11 11:27 AM, Ed Rasimus wrote:

    >
    > >> Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
    > >> thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
    > >> in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
    > >> into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
    > >> expanding the wet precincts last election.

    >
    > >Alcohol laws in the Bible Belt have traditionally been quite...er...
    > >interesting. *The worst I can recall was found in Oklahoma and later in
    > >Utah, where there were no bars, only "clubs." *In the "club," you'd pay
    > >for membership for a small fee, which would then entitle you to a locker
    > >and a glass. *You were then free to purchase a BOTTLE of liquor at the
    > >bar, pour it into your own glass and consume it on the premises. *The
    > >locker was for storing your opened bottle of liquor.

    >
    > >How this system was supposed to reduce alcohol consumption is beyond me,
    > >since it encourages consumption by the bottle!

    >
    > >Mark Lipton

    >
    > I'll match you and raise.
    >
    > Years ago, Universal City TX, Randolph AFB, about 20 Vietnam fighter
    > pilots returned and going through a pilot instructor course. All
    > gathered in a motel during the training, some with spouses. Friday
    > nite, a few drinks by the pool then a suggestion to the local
    > restaurant/supper-club.
    >
    > Walk down the block and request "table for twelve"
    >
    > "Yes sir, would you like the family room or the club room?"
    >
    > "What's the difference?"
    >
    > "In the club room you can have drink with dinner."
    >
    > "OK, we'll take club room."
    >
    > "Is anyone a member? No? No problem then simply join."
    >
    > "How much is it?"
    >
    > "Free! And only one of you needs to join. The rest can be his guests."
    >
    > "OK, now we'll eat."
    >
    > "Sorry, gentlemen in the club room must have jackets."
    >
    > "Well, we obviously don't."
    >
    > "No problem. What size are you?" And with that he turned to a wardrobe
    > behind him with about fifty of the ugliest sport coats ever made
    > awaiting us.
    >
    > It was the law in those days.


    That was how they kept things segregated.

  17. #17
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On 6/3/2011 10:30 AM, Bi!! wrote:
    > On Jun 2, 4:40 pm, Ed Rasimus<rasimusSPAML...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> On Thu, 02 Jun 2011 12:00:27 -0400, Mark Lipton<not...@eudrup.ude>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> On 6/2/11 11:27 AM, Ed Rasimus wrote:

    >>
    >>>> Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
    >>>> thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
    >>>> in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
    >>>> into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
    >>>> expanding the wet precincts last election.

    >>
    >>> Alcohol laws in the Bible Belt have traditionally been quite...er...
    >>> interesting. The worst I can recall was found in Oklahoma and later in
    >>> Utah, where there were no bars, only "clubs." In the "club," you'd pay
    >>> for membership for a small fee, which would then entitle you to a locker
    >>> and a glass. You were then free to purchase a BOTTLE of liquor at the
    >>> bar, pour it into your own glass and consume it on the premises. The
    >>> locker was for storing your opened bottle of liquor.

    >>
    >>> How this system was supposed to reduce alcohol consumption is beyond me,
    >>> since it encourages consumption by the bottle!

    >>
    >>> Mark Lipton

    >>
    >> I'll match you and raise.
    >>
    >> Years ago, Universal City TX, Randolph AFB, about 20 Vietnam fighter
    >> pilots returned and going through a pilot instructor course. All
    >> gathered in a motel during the training, some with spouses. Friday
    >> nite, a few drinks by the pool then a suggestion to the local
    >> restaurant/supper-club.
    >>
    >> Walk down the block and request "table for twelve"
    >>
    >> "Yes sir, would you like the family room or the club room?"
    >>
    >> "What's the difference?"
    >>
    >> "In the club room you can have drink with dinner."
    >>
    >> "OK, we'll take club room."
    >>
    >> "Is anyone a member? No? No problem then simply join."
    >>
    >> "How much is it?"
    >>
    >> "Free! And only one of you needs to join. The rest can be his guests."
    >>
    >> "OK, now we'll eat."
    >>
    >> "Sorry, gentlemen in the club room must have jackets."
    >>
    >> "Well, we obviously don't."
    >>
    >> "No problem. What size are you?" And with that he turned to a wardrobe
    >> behind him with about fifty of the ugliest sport coats ever made
    >> awaiting us.
    >>
    >> It was the law in those days.

    >
    > That was how they kept things segregated.


    In the 60's, upscale bars in New York City were quite good about lending
    necessary jackets. Once, I was even lent a barman's white jacket to obey
    the rules.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  18. #18
    lleichtman Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On Jun 2, 2:43*pm, Ed Rasimus <rasimusSPAML...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 13:07:06 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <larryleicht...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >On Jun 2, 9:27*am, Ed Rasimus <rasimusSPAML...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > >> On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 07:21:14 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman

    >
    > >> <larryleicht...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >> >On Jun 2, 5:49 am, "st.helier" <alphabet...@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote:
    > >> >> "lleichtman" wrote in message .....
    > >> >> >>On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
    > >> >> >> Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    > >> >> >> and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bringtheir
    > >> >> >> own wine.

    >
    > >> >> >> One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
    > >> >> >> there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.

    >
    > >> >> >> But there is a $15 screwage fee.

    >
    > >> >> > I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
    > >> >> > Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
    > >> >> > times retail not wholesale.

    >
    > >> >> ???? Larry, I am confused???
    > >> >> What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
    > >> >> Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
    > >> >> Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
    > >> >> could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
    > >> >> while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
    > >> >> And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!

    >
    > >> >> --

    >
    > >> >> st.helier

    >
    > >> >Yep, State law prevents bringing your own bottle to a restaurant.
    > >> >Don't know why. I can't get any rational explanation. It protects
    > >> >restaurants but allows them to charge ridiculous prices. You can,
    > >> >however, walk out of the restaurant with an open bottle you bought!!

    >
    > >> Alcohol laws remain largely state-by-state, which can be very good or
    > >> very bad, depending upon the state. Over the last fifty years the
    > >> trend has been favorable and each election more areas go "wet" and
    > >> there is better availability.

    >
    > >> As I recall, when I lived in NM (long ago, galaxy far away), you could
    > >> "brown-bag" beer and wine if a restaurant did not have a liquor
    > >> license. If they did, however, then you had to buy their offerings.
    > >> There also were beer/wine licenses and full-service licenses.

    >
    > >> Total licenses for the state were fixed in number, so to open a new
    > >> facility with a license you had to find a license holder willing to
    > >> sell his license. Made for a very lucrative market and often the
    > >> license was worth multiple times what the entire business was worth.

    >
    > >> Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
    > >> thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
    > >> in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
    > >> into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
    > >> expanding the wet precincts last election.

    >
    > >> Federalism reigns and I still like it better than having the feds
    > >> involved.

    >
    > >You can no longer brown bag beer or wine to any restaurant liquor
    > >license or not.

    >
    > Well, I'll be in Santa Fe for a week, in about ten days. Inn of the
    > Anasazi and some very fine dining on the agenda. No brown bags in my
    > future.
    >
    > Skipping the Compound and Geronimo this vist, but will do Anasazi,
    > Coyote Cafe (new management last year and back to the glory days!),
    > Ristra and 315 Wine Bar.
    >
    > Anybody got other favorites?


    The O eating house in Pojoaque has excellent Mediterranean style food
    and an excellent and reasonably priced wine list. Coyote has certainly
    made a comeback with Eric Destefano in charge. I also really like
    Galisteo Bistro on Gallisteo street.

  19. #19
    Ed Rasimus Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On Fri, 3 Jun 2011 08:43:05 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Jun 2, 2:43*pm, Ed Rasimus <rasimusSPAML...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 13:07:06 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> <larryleicht...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> >On Jun 2, 9:27*am, Ed Rasimus <rasimusSPAML...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> >> On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 07:21:14 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman

    >>
    >> >> <larryleicht...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> >> >On Jun 2, 5:49 am, "st.helier" <alphabet...@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote:
    >> >> >> "lleichtman" wrote in message .....
    >> >> >> >>On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
    >> >> >> >> Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
    >> >> >> >> and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
    >> >> >> >> own wine.

    >>
    >> >> >> >> One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
    >> >> >> >> there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.

    >>
    >> >> >> >> But there is a $15 screwage fee.

    >>
    >> >> >> > I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
    >> >> >> > Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
    >> >> >> > times retail not wholesale.

    >>
    >> >> >> ???? Larry, I am confused???
    >> >> >> What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
    >> >> >> Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
    >> >> >> Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
    >> >> >> could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
    >> >> >> while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
    >> >> >> And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!

    >>
    >> >> >> --

    >>
    >> >> >> st.helier

    >>
    >> >> >Yep, State law prevents bringing your own bottle to a restaurant.
    >> >> >Don't know why. I can't get any rational explanation. It protects
    >> >> >restaurants but allows them to charge ridiculous prices. You can,
    >> >> >however, walk out of the restaurant with an open bottle you bought!!

    >>
    >> >> Alcohol laws remain largely state-by-state, which can be very good or
    >> >> very bad, depending upon the state. Over the last fifty years the
    >> >> trend has been favorable and each election more areas go "wet" and
    >> >> there is better availability.

    >>
    >> >> As I recall, when I lived in NM (long ago, galaxy far away), you could
    >> >> "brown-bag" beer and wine if a restaurant did not have a liquor
    >> >> license. If they did, however, then you had to buy their offerings.
    >> >> There also were beer/wine licenses and full-service licenses.

    >>
    >> >> Total licenses for the state were fixed in number, so to open a new
    >> >> facility with a license you had to find a license holder willing to
    >> >> sell his license. Made for a very lucrative market and often the
    >> >> license was worth multiple times what the entire business was worth.

    >>
    >> >> Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
    >> >> thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
    >> >> in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
    >> >> into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
    >> >> expanding the wet precincts last election.

    >>
    >> >> Federalism reigns and I still like it better than having the feds
    >> >> involved.

    >>
    >> >You can no longer brown bag beer or wine to any restaurant liquor
    >> >license or not.

    >>
    >> Well, I'll be in Santa Fe for a week, in about ten days. Inn of the
    >> Anasazi and some very fine dining on the agenda. No brown bags in my
    >> future.
    >>
    >> Skipping the Compound and Geronimo this vist, but will do Anasazi,
    >> Coyote Cafe (new management last year and back to the glory days!),
    >> Ristra and 315 Wine Bar.
    >>
    >> Anybody got other favorites?

    >
    >The O eating house in Pojoaque has excellent Mediterranean style food
    >and an excellent and reasonably priced wine list. Coyote has certainly
    >made a comeback with Eric Destefano in charge. I also really like
    >Galisteo Bistro on Gallisteo street.


    It's amazing that Destefano doesn't have a coronary in the kitchen. At
    Geronimo you didn't see him, but at Coyote with the open kitchen it's
    tough to miss.

    We generally stay right downtown, so O will be missed. For Spanish we
    really liked La Boca last time we were in town. Pretty close to
    authentic Spanish tapas. And, they introduced me to albarino. A
    win-win!

    Might be able to squeeze Galisteo Bistro in to the mix, but there is
    also the mandatory visit to Tomasita's and I've only got four days of
    gluttony available.


  20. #20
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: Corkage Fees

    On 6/3/11 5:07 PM, Ed Rasimus wrote:

    > Might be able to squeeze Galisteo Bistro in to the mix, but there is
    > also the mandatory visit to Tomasita's and I've only got four days of
    > gluttony available.
    >


    Ed,
    Another enthusiastic vote for Galisteo Bistro. We had a great meal
    there last year when in Santa Fe. I'm psyched to hear that Coyote Cafe
    is on the upswing as we've loved the cooking at Geronimo every time
    we've been there.

    Mark Lipton

    --
    alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net

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