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Thread: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

  1. #1
    cwdjrxyz Guest

    Default Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    The wine is Callaway Vineyard & Winery, Estate bottled, 1976 Cabernet
    Sauvignon, Temecula California.. It came from 100% Cabernet Sauvignon
    vines grown on their own vinifera roots. The grapes were rushed to the
    fermentation tanks within 70 minutes of hand picking in early November
    1976 at 25.0 Brix.. The wine was fermented for 16 days at 65 F. It was
    matured in 60 gallon German white oak barrels. The wine was bottled in
    February 1978 with 12.4 % alcohol by volume and 0.66 % total acid.
    There were no cork or other issues, and the fill was high.

    The Temecula region is in the mountains fairly far south in
    California. There are many tiny microclimates because of the
    elevation, the winds, the fog cover, and the cloud cover.
    Unfortunately many of the better old vineyards are now gone due to
    commercial development, and some of the more recently made wines from
    the region are mainly for the tourist trade.

    This CS is far different from Napa CS in the 1970s. The grapes matured
    very slowly under rather cool conditions and did not have to be
    harvested until November. Nevertheless alcohol was moderate and there
    was plenty of extract. The color is still very deep, and one can
    detect some age only around the rim. The wine is mature enough to
    enjoy, but there is still a lot of tannins that now are fairly
    civilized and fairly smooth.. When young. this wine likely would have
    puckered your mouth like a green persimmon. Of course, being pure CS,
    the intense cassis character is to be expected. There is enough acid.
    Also there are spice and herb notes that are rather different from a
    Napa or Bordeaux wines based mainly on CS. The spice is of mixed
    character with nothing standing out and there is some herbal
    character- perhaps somewhat anise-like. The wine is very intense with
    a long aftertaste. It is not a hot wine, as were many CSs of the 70s,
    likely becausthe alcohol is fairly low for a California wine of the
    70s era.

    I believe Mr. Callaway was a retired CEO of a US company named after
    him. He started making wine, and apparently spared no expense in
    making wine the way he wished. He hired top wine makers, spent a
    fortune on equipment, and used the very expensive 60 gallon German
    white oak barrels.



  2. #2
    Nils Gustaf Lindgren Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    "German white oak barrels"?

    Please explain to the foreign gentleman.

    Cheers

    Nils



  3. #3
    Anders TÝrneskog Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon


    "Nils Gustaf Lindgren" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:2hzJl.8254$[email protected]..
    > "German white oak barrels"?
    >
    > Please explain to the foreign gentleman.
    >
    > Cheers
    >

    From Wiki:
    Quercus alba, the White Oak, is one of the pre-eminent hardwoods of eastern
    North America. It is a long-lived oak in the family Fagaceae, native to
    eastern North America
    White Oaks have cellular structures called tyloses. Tyloses give the wood a
    closed cellular structure, which does not allow water to pass. Tyloses are
    cell ingrowths of living wood parenchyma into the cavities of xylem
    conducting cells. The white oaks, with tyloses, are used in making wine and
    whiskey barrels as well as outdoor furniture. Red Oaks do not have the
    tyloses, thus white oak barrels are used in wine and whiskey production to
    prevent leaking, which would be the result of using red oaks. It has been
    used for construction, shipbuilding, cooperage, agricultural implements, and
    interior finish of houses.[2]

    I have no idea why they speak of German white oak, however...

    Anders





  4. #4
    cwdjrxyz Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    On Apr 28, 3:39*am, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
    <nils.lindg...@NOTAVALIDADRESS.se> wrote:
    > "German white oak barrels"?
    >
    > Please explain to the foreign gentleman.


    I answered you last night, but the post never appeared, so I will try
    again. Anders gave correct information. I do have information from an
    interview with Eli Callaway by Robert Benson in "Great Winemakers of
    California " with a copyright of 1977. The book likely is long out of
    print.Callaway states that they use German white oak from trees grown
    on Spessart mountian which is the highest mountain in Germany that
    grows oak.They selected this oak because it grows slower than anywhere
    in Europe, Therefore the oak is harder and after steam leaching it
    imparts less of its tannin character to the wine. The 60 gallon
    barrels were specially made in Germany for Callaway.

  5. #5
    Anders TÝrneskog Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon


    "cwdjrxyz" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:[email protected]...
    On Apr 28, 3:39 am, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
    <nils.lindg...@NOTAVALIDADRESS.se> wrote:
    > "German white oak barrels"?
    >
    > Please explain to the foreign gentleman.


    >I answered you last night, but the post never appeared, so I will try
    >again. Anders gave correct information. I do have information from an
    >interview with Eli Callaway by Robert Benson in "Great Winemakers of
    >California " with a copyright of 1977. The book likely is long out of
    >print.Callaway states that they use German white oak from trees grown
    >on Spessart mountian which is the highest mountain in Germany that
    >grows oak.


    Interesting.. I see that the Spessart rises to near 600m (1920feet) which is
    not all that high. Spessart is a nature park with some old sections with up
    to 400 year old oaks.
    There is a small problem, however, no white oak there... It is an American
    species, you know, not grown in Europe...
    Anders



  6. #6
    cwdjrxyz Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    On Apr 28, 4:36*pm, "Anders TÝrneskog" <sredna.goksen...@i2c.ten>
    wrote:
    > "cwdjrxyz" <spamtr...@cwdjr.info> skrev i meldingnews:[email protected]...
    > On Apr 28, 3:39 am, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
    >
    > <nils.lindg...@NOTAVALIDADRESS.se> wrote:
    > > "German white oak barrels"?

    >
    > > Please explain to the foreign gentleman.
    > >I answered you last night, but the post never appeared, so I will try
    > >again. Anders gave correct information. I do have information from an
    > >interview with Eli Callaway by Robert Benson in "Great Winemakers of
    > >California " with a copyright of 1977. The book likely is long out of
    > >print.Callaway states that they use German white oak from trees grown
    > >on Spessart mountian *which is the highest mountain in Germany that
    > >grows oak.

    >
    > Interesting.. I see that the Spessart rises to near 600m (1920feet) whichis
    > not all that high. *Spessart is a nature park with some old sections with up
    > to 400 year old oaks.
    > There is a small problem, however, no white oak there... *It is an American
    > species, you know, not grown in Europe..


    Eli Callaway called it German white oak both on the bottle back label
    and in an interview. Perhaps he just means the color of the wood. In
    any event one should use the proper scientific name to avoid confusion
    of this sort.



  7. #7
    cwdjrxyz Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    On Apr 28, 4:36*pm, "Anders TÝrneskog" <sredna.goksen...@i2c.ten>
    wrote:
    > "cwdjrxyz" <spamtr...@cwdjr.info> skrev i meldingnews:[email protected]...
    > On Apr 28, 3:39 am, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
    >
    > <nils.lindg...@NOTAVALIDADRESS.se> wrote:
    > > "German white oak barrels"?

    >
    > > Please explain to the foreign gentleman.
    > >I answered you last night, but the post never appeared, so I will try
    > >again. Anders gave correct information. I do have information from an
    > >interview with Eli Callaway by Robert Benson in "Great Winemakers of
    > >California " with a copyright of 1977. The book likely is long out of
    > >print.Callaway states that they use German white oak from trees grown
    > >on Spessart mountian *which is the highest mountain in Germany that
    > >grows oak.

    >
    > Interesting.. I see that the Spessart rises to near 600m (1920feet) whichis
    > not all that high. *Spessart is a nature park with some old sections with up
    > to 400 year old oaks.
    > There is a small problem, however, no white oak there... *It is an American
    > species, you know, not grown in Europe...
    > Anders


    Here we go again. I responded to you several hours ago, but the
    message has not shown up. Perhaps this follow up will appear soon.

    There is a reference to German white oak both on the back label and in
    the interview with Eli Callaway I mentioned. Of course use of proper
    scientific names for the oak species would prevent any confusion. When
    I go to a home improvement store here, I usually see only white oak
    and red oak boards for sale. The white oak boards are fairly close to
    white in color with a bit of yellow,and the red oak has much russet
    color. I think many people take the term red or white oak to mean the
    color of the oak wood and not a specific oak tree with a scientific
    name. This may have been what Eli Callaway was thinking. Unless he
    lived to an exceptionally old age, one likely never could find out .


  8. #8
    cwdjrxyz Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    On Apr 28, 4:36*pm, "Anders TÝrneskog" <sredna.goksen...@i2c.ten>
    wrote:
    > "cwdjrxyz" <spamtr...@cwdjr.info> skrev i meldingnews:[email protected]...
    > On Apr 28, 3:39 am, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
    >
    > <nils.lindg...@NOTAVALIDADRESS.se> wrote:
    > > "German white oak barrels"?

    >
    > > Please explain to the foreign gentleman.
    > >I answered you last night, but the post never appeared, so I will try
    > >again. Anders gave correct information. I do have information from an
    > >interview with Eli Callaway by Robert Benson in "Great Winemakers of
    > >California " with a copyright of 1977. The book likely is long out of
    > >print.Callaway states that they use German white oak from trees grown
    > >on Spessart mountian *which is the highest mountain in Germany that
    > >grows oak.

    >
    > Interesting.. I see that the Spessart rises to near 600m (1920feet) whichis
    > not all that high. *Spessart is a nature park with some old sections with up
    > to 400 year old oaks.
    > There is a small problem, however, no white oak there... *It is an American
    > species, you know, not grown in Europe...
    > Anders


    Here we go again. I responded to you several hours ago, but the
    message has not shown up. Perhaps this follow up will appear soon. If
    extra old posts appear in the future, you will know what happened.

    There is a reference to German white oak both on the back label and in
    the interview with Eli Callaway I mentioned. Of course use of proper
    scientific names for the oak species would prevent any confusion. When
    I go to a home improvement store here, I usually see only white oak
    and red oak boards for sale. The white oak boards are fairly close to
    white in color with a bit of yellow,and the red oak has much russet
    color. I think many people take the term red or white oak to mean the
    color of the oak wood and not a specific oak tree with a scientific
    name. This may have been what Eli Callaway was thinking. Unless he has
    lived to an exceptionally old age, one likely never could find out
    exactly what he had in mind when he associated the words German and
    white oak..

  9. #9
    cwdjrxyz Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    On Apr 28, 4:36*pm, "Anders TÝrneskog" <sredna.goksen...@i2c.ten>
    wrote:
    > "cwdjrxyz" <spamtr...@cwdjr.info> skrev i meldingnews:[email protected]...
    > On Apr 28, 3:39 am, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
    >
    > <nils.lindg...@NOTAVALIDADRESS.se> wrote:
    > > "German white oak barrels"?

    >
    > > Please explain to the foreign gentleman.
    > >I answered you last night, but the post never appeared, so I will try
    > >again. Anders gave correct information. I do have information from an
    > >interview with Eli Callaway by Robert Benson in "Great Winemakers of
    > >California " with a copyright of 1977. The book likely is long out of
    > >print.Callaway states that they use German white oak from trees grown
    > >on Spessart mountian *which is the highest mountain in Germany that
    > >grows oak.

    >
    > Interesting.. I see that the Spessart rises to near 600m (1920feet) whichis
    > not all that high. *Spessart is a nature park with some old sections with up
    > to 400 year old oaks.
    > There is a small problem, however, no white oak there... *It is an American
    > species, you know, not grown in Europe...
    > Anders


    I kave posted several times, but the post do not appear. If they all
    suddenly appear, you know what happeded.

    I don't know what Eli Callaway had in mind in the 1977 interview when
    he associated German with white oak. Considering he was retired then,
    we likely will never know for sure unless he is still alive at an
    exceptionally old age. German white oak was also used on the back
    label of the wine bottle.

    When I go to home improvement stores, I usually see white oak, which
    is fairly light in color and red oak which has much russet in the
    color. However white oak is not specific as there are several
    variations of white oak trees. There are many kinds of oak trees in
    the US including white oaks, red oaks, pin oaks, post oaks, black
    oaks, etc. I think many people associate the color of the wood with
    the terms white oak and red oak rather than with a specific variety.
    I think this may be what Callaway did. I think the problem, if any, is
    that a specific complete scientific names were not used.A

  10. #10
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    cwdjrxyz wrote:

    > I don't know what Eli Callaway had in mind in the 1977 interview when
    > he associated German with white oak. Considering he was retired then,
    > we likely will never know for sure unless he is still alive at an
    > exceptionally old age. German white oak was also used on the back
    > label of the wine bottle.


    Ely Callaway, the eponymous founder of Callaway Golf as well as the
    winery, died in 2001, so I am afraid that no clarification will come
    from that source. I think that your explanation sounds reasonable,
    though. Perhaps if his company had made woods from wood instead of
    metal, he wouldn't have made that mistake ;-)

    Mark Lipton
    (satisfied owner of a set of Callaway Steelhead "woods")

    --
    alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net

  11. #11
    Anders TÝrneskog Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon


    "cwdjrxyz" <[email protected]> skrev i melding
    news:ae12934f-f5c9-4b[email protected]..

    >When I go to home improvement stores, I usually see white oak, which
    >is fairly light in color and red oak which has much russet in the
    >color. However white oak is not specific as there are several
    >variations of white oak trees. There are many kinds of oak trees in
    >the US including white oaks, red oaks, pin oaks, post oaks, black
    >oaks, etc. I think many people associate the color of the wood with
    >the terms white oak and red oak rather than with a specific variety.
    >I think this may be what Callaway did. I think the problem, if any, is
    >that a specific complete scientific names were not used.A


    I think you are right. Looking around, I found this page
    http://www.diwinetaste.com/dwt/en2004046.php

    and you'll see a discussion of the various oak woods (Types and
    Characteristics of Cask's Wood)

    Anders



  12. #12
    Miles Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    cwdjrxyz wrote:


    > Unfortunately many of the better old vineyards are now gone due to
    > commercial development, and some of the more recently made wines from
    > the region are mainly for the tourist trade.


    Most of the old vines that I'm aware of are still there. Temecula has
    very strict ordinances to protect the wine industry there. The city has
    grown considerably the past 15 years or so but the vines seem to be
    protected from encroachment. There are now a couple dozen wineries in
    the region and some do produce very nice wines. Favorites are Stewert
    Cellars, Dolfia (sp), Footprint and Hart. Theres several lousy tourist
    wineries that sell mostly swill too!

  13. #13
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    Miles wrote:
    > cwdjrxyz wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Unfortunately many of the better old vineyards are now gone due to
    >> commercial development, and some of the more recently made wines from
    >> the region are mainly for the tourist trade.

    >
    > Most of the old vines that I'm aware of are still there. Temecula has
    > very strict ordinances to protect the wine industry there. The city has
    > grown considerably the past 15 years or so but the vines seem to be
    > protected from encroachment. There are now a couple dozen wineries in
    > the region and some do produce very nice wines. Favorites are Stewert
    > Cellars, Dolfia (sp), Footprint and Hart. Theres several lousy tourist
    > wineries that sell mostly swill too!


    The glassy-winged sharpshooter did take a toll on Temecula's wineries,
    though, IIRC in the early '90s. By now, I am sure that most have
    recovered (whatever happened to those bugs BTW? Did they get eaten by
    Medflies or something? :P) but there were some pretty lean years for
    them and not a few people getting out of the business altogether.

    Mark Lipton

    --
    alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net

  14. #14
    Miles Guest

    Default Re: Callaway Estate 1976 Cabernet Sauvignon

    Mark Lipton wrote:

    > The glassy-winged sharpshooter did take a toll on Temecula's wineries,
    > though, IIRC in the early '90s. By now, I am sure that most have
    > recovered (whatever happened to those bugs BTW? Did they get eaten by
    > Medflies or something? :P) but there were some pretty lean years for
    > them and not a few people getting out of the business altogether.


    Ya, the sharpshooter took a toll just about everywhere. Still,
    Temecula's wine industry has really grown the past 10 years. New
    wineries have opened up every year. I was there last November and saw a
    couple more under construction. It's a fun place to go tasting but only
    off season, mid-week on a rainy day. It's proximity to San Diego has
    made the area a tourist attraction and thus the large scale low end
    wines at high prices. Several somewhat hidden smaller wineries have
    cropped up and they seem to cater to wine lovers rather than tourists.

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