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Thread: 86 Beaucastel: drink up

  1. #1
    Emery Davis Guest

    Default 86 Beaucastel: drink up

    If you've got any of this hanging about it is IMHO time to send it on
    it's way. For a long time this wine was very dumb and it never had
    overwhelming fruit or structure. It's now quite lean, but also elegant
    and layered, not very bretty, enjoyable but clearly fading. The color
    was very light brick also.

    I have a few bottles left that need to be programmed, this one did not
    stand up well to a very good leg of venison with spiced cherries and
    figs. (Always particularly satisfying to eat maple-fed game...)

    -E

  2. #2
    Mark Lipton Guest

    Default Re: 86 Beaucastel: drink up

    On 8/24/12 5:05 AM, Emery Davis wrote:
    > If you've got any of this hanging about it is IMHO time to send it on
    > it's way. For a long time this wine was very dumb and it never had
    > overwhelming fruit or structure. It's now quite lean, but also elegant
    > and layered, not very bretty, enjoyable but clearly fading. The color
    > was very light brick also.
    >
    > I have a few bottles left that need to be programmed, this one did not
    > stand up well to a very good leg of venison with spiced cherries and
    > figs. (Always particularly satisfying to eat maple-fed game...)


    Emery,
    It's interesting to hear about this wine. Back when Jean and I moved
    here in 1990, we were dismayed to learn that Indiana law forbade
    bringing one's own wine to restaurants*, meaning that we had to rely on
    the (largely pathetic) wine lists of local restaurants. The one
    exception was an old school "Continental" restaurant that had '86
    Beaucastel on its list for $35 retail (!!) Well, for the next year we
    would occasionally stop by and order selectively off their menu (I
    ritually got the duck in orange sauce as the least offensive offering)
    and order a bottle of the Beaucastel. After a year or so, we'd finished
    the last one from their list and never returned (it closed a few years
    later). At that young age, it was young and somewhat simple, but I'm
    not terribly surprised to hear how it's developed.

    Mark Lipton

    * In response to our question about corkage fees, the hostess at one
    local restaurant, after having the concept explained to her, responded
    "That's like bringing your own eggs and bacon to a diner!" Yikes!


    --
    alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net

  3. #3
    lleichtman Guest

    Default Re: 86 Beaucastel: drink up

    On Friday, August 24, 2012 9:13:41 AM UTC-6, Mark Lipton wrote:
    > On 8/24/12 5:05 AM, Emery Davis wrote:
    >
    > > If you've got any of this hanging about it is IMHO time to send it on

    >
    > > it's way. For a long time this wine was very dumb and it never had

    >
    > > overwhelming fruit or structure. It's now quite lean, but also elegant

    >
    > > and layered, not very bretty, enjoyable but clearly fading. The color

    >
    > > was very light brick also.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I have a few bottles left that need to be programmed, this one did not

    >
    > > stand up well to a very good leg of venison with spiced cherries and

    >
    > > figs. (Always particularly satisfying to eat maple-fed game...)

    >
    >
    >
    > Emery,
    >
    > It's interesting to hear about this wine. Back when Jean and I moved
    >
    > here in 1990, we were dismayed to learn that Indiana law forbade
    >
    > bringing one's own wine to restaurants*, meaning that we had to rely on
    >
    > the (largely pathetic) wine lists of local restaurants. The one
    >
    > exception was an old school "Continental" restaurant that had '86
    >
    > Beaucastel on its list for $35 retail (!!) Well, for the next year we
    >
    > would occasionally stop by and order selectively off their menu (I
    >
    > ritually got the duck in orange sauce as the least offensive offering)
    >
    > and order a bottle of the Beaucastel. After a year or so, we'd finished
    >
    > the last one from their list and never returned (it closed a few years
    >
    > later). At that young age, it was young and somewhat simple, but I'm
    >
    > not terribly surprised to hear how it's developed.
    >
    >
    >
    > Mark Lipton
    >
    >
    >
    > * In response to our question about corkage fees, the hostess at one
    >
    > local restaurant, after having the concept explained to her, responded
    >
    > "That's like bringing your own eggs and bacon to a diner!" Yikes!
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


    We do not have corkage in NM either and it causes a 4x wholesale markup on all of our wines and not great wine lists either. I think they try harder when they have to compete with what you can bring.

  4. #4
    Emery Davis Guest

    Default Re: 86 Beaucastel: drink up

    On 08/24/2012 05:13 PM, Mark Lipton wrote:
    > On 8/24/12 5:05 AM, Emery Davis wrote:
    >> If you've got any of this hanging about it is IMHO time to send it on
    >> it's way. For a long time this wine was very dumb and it never had
    >> overwhelming fruit or structure. It's now quite lean, but also elegant
    >> and layered, not very bretty, enjoyable but clearly fading. The color
    >> was very light brick also.
    >>
    >> I have a few bottles left that need to be programmed, this one did not
    >> stand up well to a very good leg of venison with spiced cherries and
    >> figs. (Always particularly satisfying to eat maple-fed game...)

    >
    > Emery,
    > It's interesting to hear about this wine. Back when Jean and I moved
    > here in 1990, we were dismayed to learn that Indiana law forbade
    > bringing one's own wine to restaurants*, meaning that we had to rely on
    > the (largely pathetic) wine lists of local restaurants. The one
    > exception was an old school "Continental" restaurant that had '86
    > Beaucastel on its list for $35 retail (!!) Well, for the next year we
    > would occasionally stop by and order selectively off their menu (I
    > ritually got the duck in orange sauce as the least offensive offering)
    > and order a bottle of the Beaucastel. After a year or so, we'd finished
    > the last one from their list and never returned (it closed a few years
    > later). At that young age, it was young and somewhat simple, but I'm
    > not terribly surprised to hear how it's developed.
    >
    > Mark Lipton
    >
    > * In response to our question about corkage fees, the hostess at one
    > local restaurant, after having the concept explained to her, responded
    > "That's like bringing your own eggs and bacon to a diner!" Yikes!
    >
    >


    Heh, you probably put them out of business when you stopped going. All
    that margin!

  5. #5
    Bi!! Guest

    Default Re: 86 Beaucastel: drink up

    On Aug 24, 11:13*am, Mark Lipton <not...@eudrup.ude> wrote:
    > On 8/24/12 5:05 AM, Emery Davis wrote:
    >
    > > If you've got any of this hanging about it is IMHO time to send it on
    > > it's way. *For a long time this wine was very dumb and it never had
    > > overwhelming fruit or structure. *It's now quite lean, but also elegant
    > > and layered, not very bretty, enjoyable but clearly fading. *The color
    > > was very light brick also.

    >
    > > I have a few bottles left that need to be programmed, this one did not
    > > stand up well to a very good leg of venison with spiced cherries and
    > > figs. (Always particularly satisfying to eat maple-fed game...)

    >
    > Emery,
    > * *It's interesting to hear about this wine. *Back when Jean and I moved
    > here in 1990, we were dismayed to learn that Indiana law forbade
    > bringing one's own wine to restaurants*, meaning that we had to rely on
    > the (largely pathetic) wine lists of local restaurants. *The one
    > exception was an old school "Continental" restaurant that had '86
    > Beaucastel on its list for $35 retail (!!) *Well, for the next year we
    > would occasionally stop by and order selectively off their menu (I
    > ritually got the duck in orange sauce as the least offensive offering)
    > and order a bottle of the Beaucastel. *After a year or so, we'd finished
    > the last one from their list and never returned (it closed a few years
    > later). *At that young age, it was young and somewhat simple, but I'm
    > not terribly surprised to hear how it's developed.
    >
    > Mark Lipton
    >
    > * In response to our question about corkage fees, the hostess at one
    > local restaurant, after having the concept explained to her, responded
    > "That's like bringing your own eggs and bacon to a diner!" *Yikes!
    >
    > --
    > alt.food.wine FAQ: *http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


    No corkage in Ohio either but having lived here in Columbus since 1978
    I have a fairly good relationship with a number of restauanteurs that
    welcome my bottles. I always ask, I always buy a bottle from the menu
    and I always tip as if I bought the bottle there. Emery..thanks for
    the notes. Ihave two bottles left of the '86.

  6. #6
    st.helier Guest

    Default Re: 86 Beaucastel: drink up

    "Emery Davis" wrote .......
    >
    > (Always particularly satisfying to eat maple-fed game...)


    Tell me more - does Bambi climb trees to eat succulent leaves, or is your
    deer crossed with beaver?

    :-)


  7. #7
    Emery Davis Guest

    Default Re: 86 Beaucastel: drink up

    On 09/05/2012 08:57 AM, st.helier wrote:
    > "Emery Davis" wrote .......
    >>
    >> (Always particularly satisfying to eat maple-fed game...)

    >
    > Tell me more - does Bambi climb trees to eat succulent leaves, or is
    > your deer crossed with beaver?
    >
    > :-)
    >


    We haven't adopted the antipodal habit of giving cute names to stuff we
    eat. Here it's "it" as in instructions to dog: go get it! Sadly the
    dog, who is somewhat overweight but less so than I, never comes
    particularly close to bagging the enemy. But points for enthusiasm and
    all that.

    These deer eat all parts of the maple plant, bark, twigs, leaves. The
    rarer the plant the more they enjoy it. (I suspect some of the shady
    characters have hacked my stock spreadsheet. Imagine Rudolph with shades
    and a cig hanging out of his mouth, pulling the porkpie down with his
    little hooves, damn them.)

  8. #8
    st.helier Guest

    Default Re: 86 Beaucastel: drink up

    "Emery Davis" wrote .......

    On 09/05/2012 08:57 AM, st.helier wrote:
    > "Emery Davis" wrote .......
    >>
    >> (Always particularly satisfying to eat maple-fed game...)

    >
    > Tell me more - does Bambi climb trees to eat succulent leaves, or is
    > your deer crossed with beaver?
    >
    > :-)
    >
    > We haven't adopted the antipodal habit of giving cute names to stuff
    > we eat. Here it's "it" as in instructions to dog: go get it! Sadly the
    > dog, who is somewhat overweight but less so than I, never comes
    > particularly close to bagging the enemy. But points for enthusiasm
    > and all that.


    > These deer eat all parts of the maple plant, bark, twigs, leaves.
    > The rarer the plant the more they enjoy it. (I suspect some of the
    > shady characters have hacked my stock spreadsheet. Imagine
    > Rudolph with shades and a cig hanging out of his mouth,
    > pulling the porkpie down with his little hooves, damn them.)



    Ah, and here I was, thinking that you were partaking of venison naturally
    flavoured with hints of Acer Saccharum.
    My mistake - your satisfaction was gained from an act of pure
    vengeance!!!!!!!!!!
    Or, perhaps my original thoughts may not have been far from the mark.
    Was it not Homer who wrote "“Revenge is far sweeter than flowing honey” ?

    Regards from springtime in the antipodes.


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