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Thread: 2010 7th Annual Terrine Event

  1. #1
    Bill S. Guest

    Default 2010 7th Annual Terrine Event

    These are the notes of the 7th annual terrine event held au jardin, in
    which 6 people create terrines or similar dishes ahead of time, and
    then serve them with wines they feel should enhance the experience.
    I’ve taken pictures to record the appearance of each dish, and have
    attempted to crop out the people sitting behind them, sometimes less
    than successfully.

    We started with an aperitif of Ch. Beaulon, a Pineau des Chgarentes
    made by adding spirit to a red wine and aging it (in this case) for 5
    years in oak. Very pleasant drunk chilled. Sweet with a distinctive
    almond character.

    First up (and as this was a 6 hour meal, being first up has its
    advantages) was a foie gras crème brulee served with toasted brioche
    and some foie gras on the side with berry sauce. The crème brulee
    contained 14 ounces of foie gras and was a sensuous delight that was
    apparently too much for some. Sinfully rich, and instead of choosing
    a traditional rich wine like a Sauternes, the creative wine match was:

    1979 Drappier Carte d’Or Champagne – surprisingly good mousse, as
    older bubblies tend to become decidedly less bubbly. Quite a bit of
    amber colour, and a delightful nose showing complex nuttiness and
    fruit. Good acid, and a very good match for the food – I daresay a
    better one than a richer wine would have made.


    Next dish was a seafood and roasted pepper terrine with a delightful
    garnish. These are often very difficult to plate as they tend to fall
    apart, but they did a good job with this one.

    2008 Caillebourdin “Les Cris” Pouilly-Fume – I was very pleased with
    this wine. Nice citrus and mineral nose, long and tasty in the mouth
    with excellent acidity.

    2009 Joie Farms Rosé – this BC pink was made from pinot noir and
    gamay and your first response to it was ‘Strawberries!”. Your second
    and third were exactly the same, Once this wine said ‘strawberry’ it
    had conveyed all it had to say, and that’s alright for a pleasant
    summer wine, a slightly off dry quaffer that worked well with the
    seafood.

    A chicken galantine was next, made by boning out a chicken carcass and
    filling it with forcemeat, rolling and poaching it. Accompanied by a
    warm potato salad

    1990 Lopes Heredia Tondonia Blanco Rioja Reserva – ironic that the two
    oldest wines presented this year should both be whites. Or rather,
    yellows, for this one was also showing a lot of colour. A whole
    woodpile in the nose, of course, de rigeur in this sort of traditional
    white Rioja, very interesting in the nose. Viura and malvasia went
    into this wine and it finished long and tasty.

    2000 St. Benoit Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee de Grande Garde – killer
    fruit driven nose and enough tannin that I at first thought it needed
    more time, but was later convinced that it may be on plateau now and
    will hold for a few years. Sheer pleasure at this point, and so
    different from the other wine that I found it impossible to choose a
    winning match.

    I was up next with a wild mushroom terrine, that included 8 different
    types of mushrooms, many of them incorporated into a forcemeat of
    chicken, heavy cream, herbs and egg whites, with selected ones (cepes
    and morels) placed whole down the centre, the whole wrapped in bacon,
    which nicely complemented the forest flavours. I followed up with a
    simple salad intended to lighten and refresh the palate, made of cubed
    watermelon and feta cheese with chiffonier of basil (some opined there
    was too much basil – as if such a thing were possible!) and dressed
    with fresh lime juice. As I’d drizzled a nice spicy EVOO on the
    terrine, I elected not to use any oil at all in the salad.

    1994 Swanson Syrah – I’d chosen two syrahs to go with this earthy
    dish. The Swanson showed very nicely with sweet vanilla oak in the
    nose, and a hint of pepper, sweet entry and some tannin remaining. I
    thought it was quite decent until I tasted the French wine, at which
    point it was clear that the Californian example was simple in
    comparison, lacking complexity, though still good drinking on its own.

    1995 Jaboulet Cornas Dom. St. Pierre – Jaboulet had long been involved
    in this small Northern Rhone appellation (the whole of Cornas would
    fit into the lands at Vieux Telegraphe), and in 1993 bought this 4
    hectare site and released their first bottling the following year. The
    95 is a classy wine (some would say that Cornas and classy don’t go
    together, but with age these often unruly rough wines do smooth out).
    Excellent black pepper and dark fruit nose, and some pepper on palate
    as well as very good levels fo sweet fruit, finishing smoothly with
    very good length. I bought this on release and this is my first
    bottle. Wish I’d bought more. For those who own some, it is now into
    optimum drinking window with no rush.

    Next up was a stunning pate en croute with smoked duck, hazelnuts, two
    types of pastry and a raspberry onion mustard with layered chiogga
    beet/chevre carpaccio.

    2002 Lemelson Jerome Reserve Pinot Noir – a slightly musty (but not
    corky) blackberry/raspberry nose that never quite went away, with good
    high toned fruit behind, a bit warm in the mouth, concentrated
    flavours and good length. Willamette Valley.

    2006 Arcadian Fiddlestix Vd. Pinot Noir – much lighter in colour with
    a pleasant fruity nose with spice, all the elements having come
    together at this early age, attractive, sweet and with good length. I
    thought this the better wine with the food.

    Osso bucco terrine was up next with a nice pepper relish.

    1999 Produttori del Barbaresco Montestefano Reserva - this wine was
    not nearly ready for prime time, seeming closed with tar and some
    floral notes in the nose, still quite tannic and long. Needs time.

    We rested, exercised (bocce) and then had a last plate of cheese – a
    smoked Caciocavallo and a round of forme d’ambert, with:

    1994 Taurino Patriglione – a negroamaro wine from Sicily, this was
    warm in the nose with a little rubber and spice, medium to full body
    and long dry finish. Very similar to an aged Amarone.

    An additional wine popped up as well:

    2004 Quinta do Vale Meao – a baby, warm chocolate nose, very
    concentrated amd slightly sweet, this has a lengthy finish, and can be
    drunk from now until…who knows? Good.

  2. #2
    st.helier Guest

    Default Re: 2010 7th Annual Terrine Event


    "Bill S."
    <
    < These are the notes of the 7th annual terrine event held au jardin, in
    < which 6 people create terrines or similar dishes ahead of time, and
    < then serve them with wines they feel should enhance the experience.
    <

    Bill,

    Every year I read of this event - with wonderment - and lots of salivation.

    I have retained your entire post, with the intention of *trying* to copy
    'one' for inclusion in the menu for our next New Years Eve function.

    Which one, I haven't a clue - they all sound magnificent - and I have no
    chance of serving the same wines - but will no doubt find something
    similar (Clue - our NYE functions are always very champagne driven!)

    I look forward to next years postings - and 2012 and 2013 and the year after
    .........

    st.helier


  3. #3
    Bill S. Guest

    Default Re: 2010 7th Annual Terrine Event

    Very kind!

    If you want a better idea of the look of the food, see
    http://www.wineloverspage.com/forum/...hp?f=5&t=33995
    where pictures have been included.

    The only problem is coming up with ideas every year. I think I'll
    file my mushroom terrine away for future use - I am a big fungus fan!

  4. #4
    Bi!! Guest

    Default Re: 2010 7th Annual Terrine Event

    On Aug 1, 4:07*pm, "Bill S." <wspo...@aol.com> wrote:
    > These are the notes of the 7th annual terrine event held au jardin, in
    > which 6 people create terrines or similar dishes ahead of time, and
    > then serve them with wines they feel should enhance the experience.
    > I’ve taken pictures to record the appearance of each dish, and have
    > attempted to crop out the people sitting behind them, sometimes less
    > than successfully.
    >
    > We started with an aperitif of Ch. Beaulon, a Pineau des Chgarentes
    > made by adding spirit to a red wine and aging it (in this case) for 5
    > years in oak. *Very pleasant drunk chilled. Sweet with a distinctive
    > almond character.
    >
    > First up (and as this was a 6 hour meal, being first up has its
    > advantages) was a foie gras crème brulee served with toasted brioche
    > and some foie gras on the side with berry sauce. The crème brulee
    > contained 14 ounces of foie gras and was a sensuous delight that was
    > apparently too much for some. *Sinfully rich, and instead of choosing
    > a traditional rich wine like a Sauternes, the creative wine match was:
    >
    > 1979 Drappier Carte d’Or Champagne – surprisingly good mousse, as
    > older bubblies tend to become decidedly less bubbly. *Quite a bit of
    > amber colour, and a delightful nose showing complex nuttiness and
    > fruit. *Good acid, and a very good match for the food – I daresay a
    > better one than a richer wine would have made.
    >
    > Next dish was a seafood and roasted pepper terrine with a delightful
    > garnish. These are often very difficult to plate as they tend to fall
    > apart, but they did a good job with this one.
    >
    > 2008 Caillebourdin “Les Cris” Pouilly-Fume – I was very pleased with
    > this wine. Nice citrus and mineral nose, long and tasty in the mouth
    > with excellent acidity.
    >
    > 2009 *Joie Farms Rosé – this BC pink was made from pinot noir and
    > gamay and your first response to it was ‘Strawberries!”. *Your second
    > and third were exactly the same, Once this wine said ‘strawberry’ it
    > had conveyed all it had to say, and that’s alright for a pleasant
    > summer wine, a slightly off dry quaffer that worked well with the
    > seafood.
    >
    > A chicken galantine was next, made by boning out a chicken carcass and
    > filling it with forcemeat, rolling and poaching it. *Accompanied by a
    > warm potato salad
    >
    > 1990 Lopes Heredia Tondonia Blanco Rioja Reserva – ironic that the two
    > oldest wines presented this year should both be whites. *Or rather,
    > yellows, for this one was also showing a lot of colour. A whole
    > woodpile in the nose, of course, de rigeur in this sort of traditional
    > white Rioja, very interesting in the nose. *Viura and malvasia went
    > into this wine and it finished long and tasty.
    >
    > 2000 St. Benoit Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee de Grande Garde – killer
    > fruit driven nose and enough tannin that I at first thought it needed
    > more time, but was later convinced that it may be on plateau now and
    > will hold for a few years. *Sheer pleasure at this point, and so
    > different from the other wine that I found it impossible to choose a
    > winning match.
    >
    > I was up next with a wild mushroom terrine, that included 8 different
    > types of mushrooms, many of them incorporated into a forcemeat of
    > chicken, heavy cream, herbs and egg whites, with selected ones (cepes
    > and morels) placed whole down the centre, the whole wrapped in bacon,
    > which nicely complemented the forest flavours. *I followed up with a
    > simple salad intended to lighten and refresh the palate, made of cubed
    > watermelon and feta cheese with chiffonier of basil (some opined there
    > was too much basil – as if such a thing were possible!) and dressed
    > with fresh lime juice. As I’d drizzled a nice spicy EVOO on the
    > terrine, I elected not to use any oil at all in the salad.
    >
    > 1994 Swanson Syrah – I’d chosen two syrahs to go with this earthy
    > dish. The Swanson showed very nicely with sweet vanilla oak in the
    > nose, and a hint of pepper, sweet entry and some tannin remaining. I
    > thought it was quite decent until I tasted the French wine, at which
    > point it was clear that the Californian example was simple in
    > comparison, lacking complexity, though still good drinking on its own.
    >
    > 1995 Jaboulet Cornas Dom. St. Pierre – Jaboulet had long been involved
    > in this small Northern Rhone appellation (the whole of Cornas would
    > fit into the lands at Vieux Telegraphe), and in 1993 bought this 4
    > hectare site and released their first bottling the following year. The
    > 95 is a classy wine (some would say that Cornas and classy don’t go
    > together, but with age these often unruly rough wines do smooth out).
    > Excellent black pepper and dark fruit nose, and some pepper on palate
    > as well as very good levels fo sweet fruit, finishing smoothly with
    > very good length. *I bought this on release and this is my first
    > bottle. Wish I’d bought more. *For those who own some, it is now into
    > optimum drinking window with no rush.
    >
    > Next up was a stunning pate en croute with smoked duck, hazelnuts, two
    > types of pastry and a raspberry onion mustard with layered chiogga
    > beet/chevre carpaccio.
    >
    > 2002 Lemelson Jerome Reserve Pinot Noir – a slightly musty (but not
    > corky) blackberry/raspberry nose that never quite went away, with good
    > high toned fruit behind, a bit warm in the mouth, concentrated
    > flavours and good length. Willamette Valley.
    >
    > 2006 Arcadian Fiddlestix Vd. Pinot Noir – much lighter in colour with
    > a pleasant fruity nose with spice, all the elements having come
    > together at this early age, attractive, sweet and with good length. *I
    > thought this the better wine with the food.
    >
    > Osso bucco terrine was up next with a nice pepper relish.
    >
    > 1999 Produttori del Barbaresco Montestefano Reserva - *this wine was
    > not nearly ready for prime time, seeming closed with tar and some
    > floral notes in the nose, still quite tannic and long. Needs time.
    >
    > We rested, exercised (bocce) and then had a last plate of cheese – a
    > smoked Caciocavallo and a round of forme d’ambert, with:
    >
    > 1994 Taurino Patriglione – a negroamaro wine from Sicily, this was
    > warm in the nose with a little rubber and spice, medium to full body
    > and long dry finish. Very similar to an aged Amarone.
    >
    > An additional wine popped up as well:
    >
    > 2004 Quinta do Vale Meao – a baby, warm chocolate nose, very
    > concentrated amd slightly sweet, this has a lengthy finish, and can be
    > drunk from now until…who knows? *Good.


    Wow! I'm not sure what was more entertaining..the wine or the
    terrines. Thanks for the great notes on both.

  5. #5
    DaleW Guest

    Default Re: 2010 7th Annual Terrine Event

    On Aug 1, 4:07*pm, "Bill S." <wspo...@aol.com> wrote:
    > These are the notes of the 7th annual terrine event held au jardin, in
    > which 6 people create terrines or similar dishes ahead of time, and
    > then serve them with wines they feel should enhance the experience.
    > I’ve taken pictures to record the appearance of each dish, and have
    > attempted to crop out the people sitting behind them, sometimes less
    > than successfully.
    >
    > We started with an aperitif of Ch. Beaulon, a Pineau des Chgarentes
    > made by adding spirit to a red wine and aging it (in this case) for 5
    > years in oak. *Very pleasant drunk chilled. Sweet with a distinctive
    > almond character.
    >
    > First up (and as this was a 6 hour meal, being first up has its
    > advantages) was a foie gras crème brulee served with toasted brioche
    > and some foie gras on the side with berry sauce. The crème brulee
    > contained 14 ounces of foie gras and was a sensuous delight that was
    > apparently too much for some. *Sinfully rich, and instead of choosing
    > a traditional rich wine like a Sauternes, the creative wine match was:
    >
    > 1979 Drappier Carte d’Or Champagne – surprisingly good mousse, as
    > older bubblies tend to become decidedly less bubbly. *Quite a bit of
    > amber colour, and a delightful nose showing complex nuttiness and
    > fruit. *Good acid, and a very good match for the food – I daresay a
    > better one than a richer wine would have made.
    >
    > Next dish was a seafood and roasted pepper terrine with a delightful
    > garnish. These are often very difficult to plate as they tend to fall
    > apart, but they did a good job with this one.
    >
    > 2008 Caillebourdin “Les Cris” Pouilly-Fume – I was very pleased with
    > this wine. Nice citrus and mineral nose, long and tasty in the mouth
    > with excellent acidity.
    >
    > 2009 *Joie Farms Rosé – this BC pink was made from pinot noir and
    > gamay and your first response to it was ‘Strawberries!”. *Your second
    > and third were exactly the same, Once this wine said ‘strawberry’ it
    > had conveyed all it had to say, and that’s alright for a pleasant
    > summer wine, a slightly off dry quaffer that worked well with the
    > seafood.
    >
    > A chicken galantine was next, made by boning out a chicken carcass and
    > filling it with forcemeat, rolling and poaching it. *Accompanied by a
    > warm potato salad
    >
    > 1990 Lopes Heredia Tondonia Blanco Rioja Reserva – ironic that the two
    > oldest wines presented this year should both be whites. *Or rather,
    > yellows, for this one was also showing a lot of colour. A whole
    > woodpile in the nose, of course, de rigeur in this sort of traditional
    > white Rioja, very interesting in the nose. *Viura and malvasia went
    > into this wine and it finished long and tasty.
    >
    > 2000 St. Benoit Chateauneuf du Pape Cuvee de Grande Garde – killer
    > fruit driven nose and enough tannin that I at first thought it needed
    > more time, but was later convinced that it may be on plateau now and
    > will hold for a few years. *Sheer pleasure at this point, and so
    > different from the other wine that I found it impossible to choose a
    > winning match.
    >
    > I was up next with a wild mushroom terrine, that included 8 different
    > types of mushrooms, many of them incorporated into a forcemeat of
    > chicken, heavy cream, herbs and egg whites, with selected ones (cepes
    > and morels) placed whole down the centre, the whole wrapped in bacon,
    > which nicely complemented the forest flavours. *I followed up with a
    > simple salad intended to lighten and refresh the palate, made of cubed
    > watermelon and feta cheese with chiffonier of basil (some opined there
    > was too much basil – as if such a thing were possible!) and dressed
    > with fresh lime juice. As I’d drizzled a nice spicy EVOO on the
    > terrine, I elected not to use any oil at all in the salad.
    >
    > 1994 Swanson Syrah – I’d chosen two syrahs to go with this earthy
    > dish. The Swanson showed very nicely with sweet vanilla oak in the
    > nose, and a hint of pepper, sweet entry and some tannin remaining. I
    > thought it was quite decent until I tasted the French wine, at which
    > point it was clear that the Californian example was simple in
    > comparison, lacking complexity, though still good drinking on its own.
    >
    > 1995 Jaboulet Cornas Dom. St. Pierre – Jaboulet had long been involved
    > in this small Northern Rhone appellation (the whole of Cornas would
    > fit into the lands at Vieux Telegraphe), and in 1993 bought this 4
    > hectare site and released their first bottling the following year. The
    > 95 is a classy wine (some would say that Cornas and classy don’t go
    > together, but with age these often unruly rough wines do smooth out).
    > Excellent black pepper and dark fruit nose, and some pepper on palate
    > as well as very good levels fo sweet fruit, finishing smoothly with
    > very good length. *I bought this on release and this is my first
    > bottle. Wish I’d bought more. *For those who own some, it is now into
    > optimum drinking window with no rush.
    >
    > Next up was a stunning pate en croute with smoked duck, hazelnuts, two
    > types of pastry and a raspberry onion mustard with layered chiogga
    > beet/chevre carpaccio.
    >
    > 2002 Lemelson Jerome Reserve Pinot Noir – a slightly musty (but not
    > corky) blackberry/raspberry nose that never quite went away, with good
    > high toned fruit behind, a bit warm in the mouth, concentrated
    > flavours and good length. Willamette Valley.
    >
    > 2006 Arcadian Fiddlestix Vd. Pinot Noir – much lighter in colour with
    > a pleasant fruity nose with spice, all the elements having come
    > together at this early age, attractive, sweet and with good length. *I
    > thought this the better wine with the food.
    >
    > Osso bucco terrine was up next with a nice pepper relish.
    >
    > 1999 Produttori del Barbaresco Montestefano Reserva - *this wine was
    > not nearly ready for prime time, seeming closed with tar and some
    > floral notes in the nose, still quite tannic and long. Needs time.
    >
    > We rested, exercised (bocce) and then had a last plate of cheese – a
    > smoked Caciocavallo and a round of forme d’ambert, with:
    >
    > 1994 Taurino Patriglione – a negroamaro wine from Sicily, this was
    > warm in the nose with a little rubber and spice, medium to full body
    > and long dry finish. Very similar to an aged Amarone.
    >
    > An additional wine popped up as well:
    >
    > 2004 Quinta do Vale Meao – a baby, warm chocolate nose, very
    > concentrated amd slightly sweet, this has a lengthy finish, and can be
    > drunk from now until…who knows? *Good.


    wine and terrines sound great, fantastic post.

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