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Thread: Two dishes

  1. #1
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Two dishes

    I have two dishes cooking which will provide the base for dinners and
    lunches for me this week.

    The first is Antelope Swiss Steak. I have a Texas antelope chuck steak
    (bone in) which I defrosted this afternoon in cold water. I had to cut
    it into four pieces so I could fit it in my cast iron dutch oven. I
    seared the meat on all sides in a little bacon fat in the heavy dutch
    oven, then removed it and sauteed two large red onions, sliced in thin
    half slices. As that cooked I added three good sized cloves of garlic,
    smashed and minced. When the onions had lost some of their crispness, I
    poured in a small glug (two Tablespoons?) of red wine vinegar (since I
    don't cook with wine), and buried the seared steak pieces in the
    vegetation. Finally, I added one can (14oz?) of Pinecone tomatoes, the
    tomatoes rough chopped before adding them with their juice on top of the
    lot. A small glug of water just to make sure there was enough moisture,
    then put on the heavy lid. Once I heard it was going well, I dropped
    the flame down under it and plan to cook it slowly for 2-3 hours.

    Once that was on its way, I started the second dish.

    This is inspired by a casserole we ate when I was growing up, but that
    involved a lot of macaroni and little veg, plus regular grain fed ground
    beef. Mine I think I will call Peppered Elk with Cheesy Goodness. ;-)

    In a cast iron frying pan, I browned about a pound of ground elk in some
    bacon fat, breaking it up into smaller bits as it cooked. Removed meat
    from pan, put in some more fat, and sauteed a large yellow onion,
    chopped roughly. As that started to become transparent I smashed and
    minced two gloves of garlic and added them. Then I took three bell
    peppers, one green, one yellow, and one red, and chopped them about the
    same dimensions as the onion (.5 inch on a side maybe?). (All right, I
    confess. The *first* thing I did was chop the peppers.) I sauteed the
    lot together, adding some salt and pepper. Finally I pinched back a
    couple of basil plants I have growing, chopped the leaves (about 3
    Tablespoons total?) and added them. Turned off the fire.

    In a pyrex casserole I assembled the dish. In the bottom I put the
    veggie mixture. On top of that I spread a 16 ounce container of full
    fat cottage cheese. Then I sprinkled liberally some Trader Joe's Quatre
    Formaggio shredded Italian cheese. The browned elk went on top of that,
    and more shredded cheese went on top. It's now in a 325F oven, and I'll
    check it at 45 minutes to see if it needs more.

    Have I mentioned that I love to cook? :-)

    Priscilla, T2

  2. #2
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    "Peppermint Patootie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I have two dishes cooking which will provide the base for dinners and
    > lunches for me this week.
    >
    > The first is Antelope Swiss Steak. I have a Texas antelope chuck steak
    > (bone in) which I defrosted this afternoon in cold water. I had to cut
    > it into four pieces so I could fit it in my cast iron dutch oven. I
    > seared the meat on all sides in a little bacon fat in the heavy dutch
    > oven, then removed it and sauteed two large red onions, sliced in thin
    > half slices. As that cooked I added three good sized cloves of garlic,
    > smashed and minced. When the onions had lost some of their crispness, I
    > poured in a small glug (two Tablespoons?) of red wine vinegar (since I
    > don't cook with wine), and buried the seared steak pieces in the
    > vegetation. Finally, I added one can (14oz?) of Pinecone tomatoes, the
    > tomatoes rough chopped before adding them with their juice on top of the
    > lot. A small glug of water just to make sure there was enough moisture,
    > then put on the heavy lid. Once I heard it was going well, I dropped
    > the flame down under it and plan to cook it slowly for 2-3 hours.
    >
    > Once that was on its way, I started the second dish.
    >
    > This is inspired by a casserole we ate when I was growing up, but that
    > involved a lot of macaroni and little veg, plus regular grain fed ground
    > beef. Mine I think I will call Peppered Elk with Cheesy Goodness. ;-)
    >
    > In a cast iron frying pan, I browned about a pound of ground elk in some
    > bacon fat, breaking it up into smaller bits as it cooked. Removed meat
    > from pan, put in some more fat, and sauteed a large yellow onion,
    > chopped roughly. As that started to become transparent I smashed and
    > minced two gloves of garlic and added them. Then I took three bell
    > peppers, one green, one yellow, and one red, and chopped them about the
    > same dimensions as the onion (.5 inch on a side maybe?). (All right, I
    > confess. The *first* thing I did was chop the peppers.) I sauteed the
    > lot together, adding some salt and pepper. Finally I pinched back a
    > couple of basil plants I have growing, chopped the leaves (about 3
    > Tablespoons total?) and added them. Turned off the fire.
    >
    > In a pyrex casserole I assembled the dish. In the bottom I put the
    > veggie mixture. On top of that I spread a 16 ounce container of full
    > fat cottage cheese. Then I sprinkled liberally some Trader Joe's Quatre
    > Formaggio shredded Italian cheese. The browned elk went on top of that,
    > and more shredded cheese went on top. It's now in a 325F oven, and I'll
    > check it at 45 minutes to see if it needs more.
    >
    > Have I mentioned that I love to cook? :-)
    >
    > Priscilla, T2


    Sure sounds good.

    Cheri



  3. #3
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    Peppermint Patootie <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I have two dishes cooking which will provide the base for dinners and
    : lunches for me this week.

    : The first is Antelope Swiss Steak. I have a Texas antelope chuck steak
    : (bone in) which I defrosted this afternoon in cold water. I had to cut
    : it into four pieces so I could fit it in my cast iron dutch oven. I
    : seared the meat on all sides in a little bacon fat in the heavy dutch
    : oven, then removed it and sauteed two large red onions, sliced in thin
    : half slices. As that cooked I added three good sized cloves of garlic,
    : smashed and minced. When the onions had lost some of their crispness, I
    : poured in a small glug (two Tablespoons?) of red wine vinegar (since I
    : don't cook with wine), and buried the seared steak pieces in the
    : vegetation. Finally, I added one can (14oz?) of Pinecone tomatoes, the
    : tomatoes rough chopped before adding them with their juice on top of the
    : lot. A small glug of water just to make sure there was enough moisture,
    : then put on the heavy lid. Once I heard it was going well, I dropped
    : the flame down under it and plan to cook it slowly for 2-3 hours.

    : Once that was on its way, I started the second dish.

    : This is inspired by a casserole we ate when I was growing up, but that
    : involved a lot of macaroni and little veg, plus regular grain fed ground
    : beef. Mine I think I will call Peppered Elk with Cheesy Goodness. ;-)

    : In a cast iron frying pan, I browned about a pound of ground elk in some
    : bacon fat, breaking it up into smaller bits as it cooked. Removed meat
    : from pan, put in some more fat, and sauteed a large yellow onion,
    : chopped roughly. As that started to become transparent I smashed and
    : minced two gloves of garlic and added them. Then I took three bell
    : peppers, one green, one yellow, and one red, and chopped them about the
    : same dimensions as the onion (.5 inch on a side maybe?). (All right, I
    : confess. The *first* thing I did was chop the peppers.) I sauteed the
    : lot together, adding some salt and pepper. Finally I pinched back a
    : couple of basil plants I have growing, chopped the leaves (about 3
    : Tablespoons total?) and added them. Turned off the fire.

    : In a pyrex casserole I assembled the dish. In the bottom I put the
    : veggie mixture. On top of that I spread a 16 ounce container of full
    : fat cottage cheese. Then I sprinkled liberally some Trader Joe's Quatre
    : Formaggio shredded Italian cheese. The browned elk went on top of that,
    : and more shredded cheese went on top. It's now in a 325F oven, and I'll
    : check it at 45 minutes to see if it needs more.

    : Have I mentioned that I love to cook? :-)

    : Priscilla, T2

    Yup, but I never realized that you were so into game. did you hunt it
    yourself? I was with you until the cheese wit the ground elk. Did you
    know that, if properly slaughtered, deer and antelope and elk are kosher.
    they all have cloven hooves and chew their cud.

    Let us all know how these dishes come out.

    Wendy


  4. #4
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    x-no-archive: yes


    [snip]
    > Have I mentioned that I love to cook? :-)
    >



    Wow, Priscilla, you'll be eating high on the wild animal all week!

    Did you fell them with bow and arrow, too? ;-)

    Antelope and elk, huh?

    Susan

  5. #5
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Susan <[email protected]> wrote:
    > x-no-archive: yes
    > Wow, Priscilla, you'll be eating high on the wild animal all week!
    >
    > Did you fell them with bow and arrow, too? ;-)
    >
    > Antelope and elk, huh?


    Heh! Once I got into grass fed meat, I found a whole range (pun
    intentional) of grass fed meat sources. I eat grass fed beef, buffalo,
    elk, venison, antelope, lamb, and boar. I have a chest freezer in my
    basement full of it. Only rarely do I buy meat at the supermarket any
    more. I do buy chickens there and pork at the Asian market. The anglo
    markets don't have the right cuts of pork for how I like to cook. Too
    lean and dry.

    The more exotic meats are from Broken Arrow Ranch in Texas. Beef
    ranchers hire them to come in and clean out non-beef animals eating on
    their range, competing for food with their steers. Broken Arrow takes
    free range grass fed meat, are paid by the ranchers, and then sell the
    meat to foodies like me. Win-win-double win.

    It's not as cheap as supermarket meat, but I take advantage of sales and
    have found some sources with more reasonable shipping costs. Plus the
    meat is more flavorful, and I know it's better for me.

    A side benefit is that my status updates on FaceBook get a lot of
    comments. I'm told I'm the only person to have had a status update
    which contained both "brisket" and "buffalo!"

    Priscilla

  6. #6
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    In article <hibeim$b2a$[email protected]>,
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Yup, but I never realized that you were so into game. did you hunt it
    > yourself?


    See my answer to Susan. I've never hunted myself, and I don't approve
    of hunting as sport, but hunting to feed one's family is entirely
    honorable, I think. My uncle in Montana who worked for the Dept. of the
    Interior for years used to take an elk every year, and his family ate
    off it all winter. His job *was* population monitoring of the elk,
    after all, and he did what the wolves did -- took an old animal who was
    weakening. That's how herds survive and even thrive, when civilization
    doesn't encroach on their range.

    > I was with you until the cheese wit the ground elk. Did you
    > know that, if properly slaughtered, deer and antelope and elk are kosher.
    > they all have cloven hooves and chew their cud.


    If I'd thought about it I'd have probably figured it out. Horses don't
    chew their cud, right? So they're not kosher. This antelope was
    strongly reminiscent of horse. I've never eaten it, but we used to feed
    the family cat frozen raw horse meat when I was a kid, so I handled it a
    lot then. I never sampled it, although the cat did get shorted when he
    had plain canned cat tuna. It was just dark meat tuna with nothing else
    added in, and I generally helped myself when I fed him. Good stuff.
    When I was in college I had fresh blue fin tuna for the first time.
    Wow, is that stuff good! And they used to feed it to pets.

    > Let us all know how these dishes come out.


    The antelope swiss steak was finished in a way I can't do every day. It
    wasn't sufficiently cooked when I wanted to go to bed, so I just took
    the dutch oven out to the front enclosed porch, set it on the concrete
    slab, and left it there. It went down to about 10F last night and
    didn't go much above 20F today. When I got home from church, I brought
    it inside and put it on a low flame on the stove to thaw. It then
    heated slowly and finished cooking. I removed the meat and let it cool
    while I reduced the liquid some. I thought it needed something more, so
    I took a couple of big organic carrots that came in my box this week
    from Boston Organics and cut them into 1/2 coins and tossed them in.
    When they were just barely cooked I pulled the meat apart (I used my
    hands instead of a knife) and added it back in. I had a small dish of
    it for supper. It would have benefited from a green veg on the side,
    but I was happy. I'm now calling it "Antelope with Carrots,
    Swiss-style."

    The Peppered Elk with Cheesy Goodness ended up really watery.
    Commercial cottage cheese has too much liquid in it. Next time I'll
    press the water out. The flavor is wonderful, so I happily spooned it
    up last night for a late supper. Two more servings are in plastic
    containers waiting to go to work for lunches this week. Once I have the
    recipe perfected, I think this will be "Elk Cottage Casserole."

    Priscilla, having fun with food

  7. #7
    KROM Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    the best sausage I ever ate was made from elk.yum!

    I've had lots of deer and elk and moose etc over the years and when cooked
    right was always good.

    KROM


    "Peppermint Patootie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <hibeim$b2a$[email protected]>,
    > "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Yup, but I never realized that you were so into game. did you hunt it
    >> yourself?

    >
    > See my answer to Susan. I've never hunted myself, and I don't approve
    > of hunting as sport, but hunting to feed one's family is entirely
    > honorable, I think. My uncle in Montana who worked for the Dept. of the
    > Interior for years used to take an elk every year, and his family ate
    > off it all winter. His job *was* population monitoring of the elk,
    > after all, and he did what the wolves did -- took an old animal who was
    > weakening. That's how herds survive and even thrive, when civilization
    > doesn't encroach on their range.
    >
    >> I was with you until the cheese wit the ground elk. Did you
    >> know that, if properly slaughtered, deer and antelope and elk are kosher.
    >> they all have cloven hooves and chew their cud.

    >
    > If I'd thought about it I'd have probably figured it out. Horses don't
    > chew their cud, right? So they're not kosher. This antelope was
    > strongly reminiscent of horse. I've never eaten it, but we used to feed
    > the family cat frozen raw horse meat when I was a kid, so I handled it a
    > lot then. I never sampled it, although the cat did get shorted when he
    > had plain canned cat tuna. It was just dark meat tuna with nothing else
    > added in, and I generally helped myself when I fed him. Good stuff.
    > When I was in college I had fresh blue fin tuna for the first time.
    > Wow, is that stuff good! And they used to feed it to pets.
    >
    >> Let us all know how these dishes come out.

    >
    > The antelope swiss steak was finished in a way I can't do every day. It
    > wasn't sufficiently cooked when I wanted to go to bed, so I just took
    > the dutch oven out to the front enclosed porch, set it on the concrete
    > slab, and left it there. It went down to about 10F last night and
    > didn't go much above 20F today. When I got home from church, I brought
    > it inside and put it on a low flame on the stove to thaw. It then
    > heated slowly and finished cooking. I removed the meat and let it cool
    > while I reduced the liquid some. I thought it needed something more, so
    > I took a couple of big organic carrots that came in my box this week
    > from Boston Organics and cut them into 1/2 coins and tossed them in.
    > When they were just barely cooked I pulled the meat apart (I used my
    > hands instead of a knife) and added it back in. I had a small dish of
    > it for supper. It would have benefited from a green veg on the side,
    > but I was happy. I'm now calling it "Antelope with Carrots,
    > Swiss-style."
    >
    > The Peppered Elk with Cheesy Goodness ended up really watery.
    > Commercial cottage cheese has too much liquid in it. Next time I'll
    > press the water out. The flavor is wonderful, so I happily spooned it
    > up last night for a late supper. Two more servings are in plastic
    > containers waiting to go to work for lunches this week. Once I have the
    > recipe perfected, I think this will be "Elk Cottage Casserole."
    >
    > Priscilla, having fun with food



  8. #8
    Jacquie Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    We lived in Montana when I was a child. My Dad hunted Elk often to fill our
    freezer...it certainly helped spread the grocery budget. The only thing I
    didn't like was the heart...which was my Mom's favorite, so that was the
    first dish we would have after the hunt Have you ever been to
    Yellowstone? I was shocked at how big the herd of Elk were I can understand
    why they have to be hunted. When we lived in Florida they were really having
    a problem with to many deer...I think it was mostly in the South . Deer were
    starving to death because there wasn't enough food to feed the large amount
    of deer, so they had to start culling the herds. When we take the predators
    away , it can really mess up Mother Natures Plan. There were allot of deer,
    in the part of Florida where we lived too but we had many hunters so the
    size of the herds were kept a bit smaller. I worked at a Army Ranger Camp,
    and when I drove the 28 miles through dark forest at night , I was always
    stopping for deer in the middle of the road.

    "Peppermint Patootie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <hibeim$b2a$[email protected]>,
    > "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Yup, but I never realized that you were so into game. did you hunt it
    >> yourself?

    >
    > See my answer to Susan. I've never hunted myself, and I don't approve
    > of hunting as sport, but hunting to feed one's family is entirely
    > honorable, I think. My uncle in Montana who worked for the Dept. of the
    > Interior for years used to take an elk every year, and his family ate
    > off it all winter. His job *was* population monitoring of the elk,
    > after all, and he did what the wolves did -- took an old animal who was
    > weakening. That's how herds survive and even thrive, when civilization
    > doesn't encroach on their range.
    >
    >> I was with you until the cheese wit the ground elk. Did you
    >> know that, if properly slaughtered, deer and antelope and elk are kosher.
    >> they all have cloven hooves and chew their cud.

    >
    > If I'd thought about it I'd have probably figured it out. Horses don't
    > chew their cud, right? So they're not kosher. This antelope was
    > strongly reminiscent of horse. I've never eaten it, but we used to feed
    > the family cat frozen raw horse meat when I was a kid, so I handled it a
    > lot then. I never sampled it, although the cat did get shorted when he
    > had plain canned cat tuna. It was just dark meat tuna with nothing else
    > added in, and I generally helped myself when I fed him. Good stuff.
    > When I was in college I had fresh blue fin tuna for the first time.
    > Wow, is that stuff good! And they used to feed it to pets.
    >
    >> Let us all know how these dishes come out.

    >
    > The antelope swiss steak was finished in a way I can't do every day. It
    > wasn't sufficiently cooked when I wanted to go to bed, so I just took
    > the dutch oven out to the front enclosed porch, set it on the concrete
    > slab, and left it there. It went down to about 10F last night and
    > didn't go much above 20F today. When I got home from church, I brought
    > it inside and put it on a low flame on the stove to thaw. It then
    > heated slowly and finished cooking. I removed the meat and let it cool
    > while I reduced the liquid some. I thought it needed something more, so
    > I took a couple of big organic carrots that came in my box this week
    > from Boston Organics and cut them into 1/2 coins and tossed them in.
    > When they were just barely cooked I pulled the meat apart (I used my
    > hands instead of a knife) and added it back in. I had a small dish of
    > it for supper. It would have benefited from a green veg on the side,
    > but I was happy. I'm now calling it "Antelope with Carrots,
    > Swiss-style."
    >
    > The Peppered Elk with Cheesy Goodness ended up really watery.
    > Commercial cottage cheese has too much liquid in it. Next time I'll
    > press the water out. The flavor is wonderful, so I happily spooned it
    > up last night for a late supper. Two more servings are in plastic
    > containers waiting to go to work for lunches this week. Once I have the
    > recipe perfected, I think this will be "Elk Cottage Casserole."
    >
    > Priscilla, having fun with food
    >




  9. #9
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    Peppermint Patootie <[email protected]> wrote:
    : In article <hibeim$b2a$[email protected]>,
    : "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    : > Yup, but I never realized that you were so into game. did you hunt it
    : > yourself?

    : See my answer to Susan. I've never hunted myself, and I don't approve
    : of hunting as sport, but hunting to feed one's family is entirely
    : honorable, I think. My uncle in Montana who worked for the Dept. of the
    : Interior for years used to take an elk every year, and his family ate
    : off it all winter. His job *was* population monitoring of the elk,
    : after all, and he did what the wolves did -- took an old animal who was
    : weakening. That's how herds survive and even thrive, when civilization
    : doesn't encroach on their range.

    : > I was with you until the cheese wit the ground elk. Did you
    : > know that, if properly slaughtered, deer and antelope and elk are kosher.
    : > they all have cloven hooves and chew their cud.

    : If I'd thought about it I'd have probably figured it out. Horses don't
    : chew their cud, right? So they're not kosher. This antelope was
    : strongly reminiscent of horse. I've never eaten it, but we used to feed
    : the family cat frozen raw horse meat when I was a kid, so I handled it a
    : lot then. I never sampled it, although the cat did get shorted when he
    : had plain canned cat tuna. It was just dark meat tuna with nothing else
    : added in, and I generally helped myself when I fed him. Good stuff.
    : When I was in college I had fresh blue fin tuna for the first time.
    : Wow, is that stuff good! And they used to feed it to pets.

    : > Let us all know how these dishes come out.

    : The antelope swiss steak was finished in a way I can't do every day. It
    : wasn't sufficiently cooked when I wanted to go to bed, so I just took
    : the dutch oven out to the front enclosed porch, set it on the concrete
    : slab, and left it there. It went down to about 10F last night and
    : didn't go much above 20F today. When I got home from church, I brought
    : it inside and put it on a low flame on the stove to thaw. It then
    : heated slowly and finished cooking. I removed the meat and let it cool
    : while I reduced the liquid some. I thought it needed something more, so
    : I took a couple of big organic carrots that came in my box this week
    : from Boston Organics and cut them into 1/2 coins and tossed them in.
    : When they were just barely cooked I pulled the meat apart (I used my
    : hands instead of a knife) and added it back in. I had a small dish of
    : it for supper. It would have benefited from a green veg on the side,
    : but I was happy. I'm now calling it "Antelope with Carrots,
    : Swiss-style."

    : The Peppered Elk with Cheesy Goodness ended up really watery.
    : Commercial cottage cheese has too much liquid in it. Next time I'll
    : press the water out. The flavor is wonderful, so I happily spooned it
    : up last night for a late supper. Two more servings are in plastic
    : containers waiting to go to work for lunches this week. Once I have the
    : recipe perfected, I think this will be "Elk Cottage Casserole."

    : Priscilla, having fun with food

    Do you think that ricotta or Farmer Cheese, which is a kind of dry cottage
    cheese might work?

    I hate to be givig this advice to someone for a cheese-meat dish:-)

    Wendt

  10. #10
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    In article <higcpr$bb0$[email protected]>,
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Do you think that ricotta or Farmer Cheese, which is a kind of dry cottage
    > cheese might work?
    >
    > I hate to be givig this advice to someone for a cheese-meat dish:-)


    LOL! I sympathize with your conflict. But I'm the one going to be
    eating it, and I'm not bound by kosher laws, right? Being a heathen and
    all I can eat what I like! ;-)

    Yes, I was thinking farmer cheese, but it occurred to me that if I
    couldn't find it, then draining cottage cheese in cheesecloth could
    provide a similar product.

    Priscilla, always the heretic

  11. #11
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    In article <[email protected]> ,
    "Jacquie" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > We lived in Montana when I was a child. My Dad hunted Elk often to fill our
    > freezer...it certainly helped spread the grocery budget. The only thing I
    > didn't like was the heart...which was my Mom's favorite, so that was the
    > first dish we would have after the hunt Have you ever been to
    > Yellowstone? I was shocked at how big the herd of Elk were I can understand
    > why they have to be hunted. When we lived in Florida they were really having
    > a problem with to many deer...I think it was mostly in the South . Deer were
    > starving to death because there wasn't enough food to feed the large amount
    > of deer, so they had to start culling the herds. When we take the predators
    > away , it can really mess up Mother Natures Plan. There were allot of deer,
    > in the part of Florida where we lived too but we had many hunters so the
    > size of the herds were kept a bit smaller. I worked at a Army Ranger Camp,
    > and when I drove the 28 miles through dark forest at night , I was always
    > stopping for deer in the middle of the road.


    I've always lived on the east coast -- born and raised in New York City
    with summers in Michigan and then later in Vermont. College in Maine.
    Been in Boston ever since.

    My elk-hunting uncle invited folks to come out and visit, but I never
    took him up on it. Now he's elderly, and the invitation probably isn't
    still open. :-(

    Proper (non-sport) hunting is good for wildlife populations if we remove
    natural predators. It's cruel to let many deer/elk/antelope starve
    rather than taking out a few old and infirm animals. That's what their
    natural predators would have done -- help maintain herd health by taking
    out weak young (get their genes out of the gene pool) and the old or ill.

    Priscilla

  12. #12
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Peppermint Patootie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The antelope swiss steak was finished in a way I can't do every day...
    > ...I had a small dish of
    > it for supper. It would have benefited from a green veg on the side,
    > but I was happy. I'm now calling it "Antelope with Carrots,
    > Swiss-style."


    Had some last night with a big pile of green beans. Excellent!

    PP

  13. #13
    Nicky Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    On Sat, 09 Jan 2010 20:19:29 -0500, Peppermint Patootie
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Have I mentioned that I love to cook? :-)


    The dishes sounded gorgeous! I'd love to try elk. We were out
    celebrating hubby's birthday tonight, I had some venison

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 150ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.2% BMI 26

  14. #14
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    Peppermint Patootie <[email protected]> wrote:
    : In article <higcpr$bb0$[email protected]>,
    : "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    : >
    : > Do you think that ricotta or Farmer Cheese, which is a kind of dry cottage
    : > cheese might work?
    : >
    : > I hate to be givig this advice to someone for a cheese-meat dish:-)

    : LOL! I sympathize with your conflict. But I'm the one going to be
    : eating it, and I'm not bound by kosher laws, right? Being a heathen and
    : all I can eat what I like! ;-)

    I wouldn't term yu a heathen, but no, you are not obligated, only
    obligated to follow the 7 Noachide laws, most of which seem to call for a
    reasoned, good society and that you should not tear the limb of a livign
    animal off to eat it. I do't imagine you have been doing that:-)

    : Yes, I
    was thinking farmer cheese, but it occurred to me that if
    I : couldn't find it, then draining cottage cheese in cheesecloth could
    : provide a similar product.

    Probably-also look for something I havn't seen for uite a while, Pot
    "Cheese, essentially cottage cheese that has not be "creamed."

    : Priscilla, always the heretic

    Stop trying to shock:-)

    Wendy

  15. #15
    Nick Cramer Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [ . . . ]
    > : Yes, I
    > was thinking farmer cheese, but it occurred to me that if
    > I : couldn't find it, then draining cottage cheese in cheesecloth could
    > : provide a similar product.
    >
    > Probably-also look for something I havn't seen for uite a while, Pot
    > "Cheese, essentially cottage cheese that has not be "creamed."


    Ricotta cheese can also be drained. Fresh goat's milk ricotta drained
    overnight makes a great cheesecake.

    I'm an atheistic Buddhist. Does that make me a heathen? LOL

    Best to you and Sid.

    --
    Nick, KI6VAV. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and their
    families: https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/ Thank a Veteran!
    Support Our Troops: http://anymarine.com/ You are not forgotten.
    Thanks ! ! ~Semper Fi~ USMC 1365061

  16. #16
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Re: Two dishes

    In article <hij32v$oqg$[email protected]>,
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > : Priscilla, always the heretic
    >
    > Stop trying to shock:-)
    >
    > Wendy


    Oh, why? *whine*

    PP

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