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Thread: turkey rolls

  1. #1
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default turkey rolls

    ok this is rambling and i am describing something the dh does, it tastes
    great, works nicely after cooked for several dishes, reheat or eat cold
    slice thin or dice, your choice...

    you take a totally thawed turkey, you cut right down the nmiddle of the
    breast from top to bottom, then turn it over and do the same thing at the
    back so without breaking any bones you have two halves fof the bird...

    remove the legs and wings, set aside for another meal/meals or if you have
    an el roaster as we had you can lay those and the giblets and neck on top of
    the rolls to roast.

    after wings and legs are gone and you have divided the bird, you begin
    pulling the meat off the bird, rolling the skin in towards the meat into a
    roll, if there is a particularly tough bit use a sharp knife to liberate the
    meat from the bone, when you are done doing this you have two halves of the
    bird which has some dark meat because of the thigh and back rib part... if
    you are getting fancy you then place it meat side down and pound the higer
    parts until its the same thickness all over, dh skips this part.

    then turn it skin side down on the board, fold in the thigh meat spreading
    it out as far as you can but don't rib or tear it. you do this so it
    marbles the whit but its also a non critical thing, once this is spread go
    to the other side of the meat and fold in the outside edge to get as
    straight an edge as possible...

    once your meat resembles a rectangle you begin rolling the meat up like a
    jelly roll . start rolling from the short side where the darkmeat is
    closest. Once its rolled you can tie it with oven string or skewer it, dh
    just puts both rolls in a pan with out securing it face down with the seam.

    roast as you would normally a turkey, either on a rack, in the bottom of the
    pan or on vegetables, cook to your desired level of doness.

    when its done, dh uses a thermometer remove from pan and let it rest while
    you make the gravy of your choice with the drippings.

    slice and serve with the trimmings of your choice.

    you can spice this on both sides before rolling with the spices of your
    choice, but dh cooks it plain because we try and get the hugest turkey
    possible and after its roasted he cuts it into chuncks so we can freeze it.

    this yeilds the two large rolls, two legs and two wings, which as i said
    earlier he used to roast on top of the rolls. this makes a lot of meals and
    freezes nicely...

    once cold you can slice for sands or salads.

    it reheats easily and you can also dice it for soup and other alaking type
    things... but i am guessing as i typed that its not kosher...

    other variations, use a chicken instead and make a stuffing of choice and
    spread on a before you fold in the side and dark meat, then roll tightly as
    before and roast as usual. if you are using a stuffing then it will do
    better if you secure it.

    starting with a chicken lets you get the hang of the process with a much
    smaller weight so it won't get away from you as easily and become pet food.



    when we freeze this sometimes dh slices what would be a meal for us, puts in
    two servings i meant in a container and covers with gravy to freeze, so
    reheating is easy and the gravy covering the meat keeps down freezer burn...
    this works especially well with the stuffed version.

    we also freese it in a chunck that is about eight oz to sixteen ounces
    depending on how big the bird is and how easily it cut...

    and totally unrelated but a tip i learned from the DHh's step mother, she
    buys a turkey and cuts it in half with kitchen shears and freezes the half
    she isn't cooking so she will have it later. she roasts it the regular way
    but just puts the cut /inside part down.

    I hope this makes some kind of sense



  2. #2
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    Storrmmee <[email protected]> wrote:




    : you can spice this on both sides before rolling with the spices of your
    : choice, but dh cooks it plain because we try and get the hugest turkey
    : possible and after its roasted he cuts it into chuncks so we can freeze it.

    : once cold you can slice for sands or salads.

    : it reheats easily and you can also dice it for soup and other alaking type
    : things... but i am guessing as i typed that its not kosher...

    This looks like it ould be good for a large buffet, so you wuld have
    rether more even slices and can cut is easily.

    My mother used to make a chicken a la king with a veloute sauce(that's
    cream sauce made with chicken stock instea of the milk) it was very good,
    too. I remember her putting pimento into it. You can get quite ingenious
    in making many dishes kosher by clever substitutions.

    Wendy



  3. #3
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    now that is clever and i would like to know more, Lee
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j5ivvk$aje$[email protected]..
    > Storrmmee <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > : you can spice this on both sides before rolling with the spices of your
    > : choice, but dh cooks it plain because we try and get the hugest turkey
    > : possible and after its roasted he cuts it into chuncks so we can freeze
    > it.
    >
    > : once cold you can slice for sands or salads.
    >
    > : it reheats easily and you can also dice it for soup and other alaking
    > type
    > : things... but i am guessing as i typed that its not kosher...
    >
    > This looks like it ould be good for a large buffet, so you wuld have
    > rether more even slices and can cut is easily.
    >
    > My mother used to make a chicken a la king with a veloute sauce(that's
    > cream sauce made with chicken stock instea of the milk) it was very good,
    > too. I remember her putting pimento into it. You can get quite ingenious
    > in making many dishes kosher by clever substitutions.
    >
    > Wendy
    >
    >




  4. #4
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    the evenness of the slices as well as the presentation for a nice dinner
    make this worthwhile... on the serving tray the nice golden brown crispy
    skin along with the moist tender meat is wonderful, ad the marbeled effect
    of the meat is also attractive... just truly so versatile, and when all the
    work is done if you do a huge one lots of easy meals with little/no work...
    and i forgot, those bones make great turkey broth. Lee
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j5ivvk$aje$[email protected]..
    > Storrmmee <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > : you can spice this on both sides before rolling with the spices of your
    > : choice, but dh cooks it plain because we try and get the hugest turkey
    > : possible and after its roasted he cuts it into chuncks so we can freeze
    > it.
    >
    > : once cold you can slice for sands or salads.
    >
    > : it reheats easily and you can also dice it for soup and other alaking
    > type
    > : things... but i am guessing as i typed that its not kosher...
    >
    > This looks like it ould be good for a large buffet, so you wuld have
    > rether more even slices and can cut is easily.
    >
    > My mother used to make a chicken a la king with a veloute sauce(that's
    > cream sauce made with chicken stock instea of the milk) it was very good,
    > too. I remember her putting pimento into it. You can get quite ingenious
    > in making many dishes kosher by clever substitutions.
    >
    > Wendy
    >
    >




  5. #5
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    Storrmmee <[email protected]> wrote:
    : now that is clever and i would like to know more, Lee
    : "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    : news:j5ivvk$aje$[email protected]..
    : > Storrmmee <[email protected]> wrote:
    : >
    : >
    : >
    : >
    : > : you can spice this on both sides before rolling with the spices of your
    : > : choice, but dh cooks it plain because we try and get the hugest turkey
    : > : possible and after its roasted he cuts it into chuncks so we can freeze
    : > it.
    : >
    : > : once cold you can slice for sands or salads.
    : >
    : > : it reheats easily and you can also dice it for soup and other alaking
    : > type
    : > : things... but i am guessing as i typed that its not kosher...
    : >
    : > This looks like it ould be good for a large buffet, so you wuld have
    : > rether more even slices and can cut is easily.
    : >
    : > My mother used to make a chicken a la king with a veloute sauce(that's
    : > cream sauce made with chicken stock instea of the milk) it was very good,
    : > too. I remember her putting pimento into it. You can get quite ingenious
    : > in making many dishes kosher by clever substitutions.
    : >
    : > Wendy

    It's quite simple. Take any chicken A LaKing recipe you like and use the
    chicken soup or stock in place of the milk in the "cream" sauce. I use
    sliced musrooms and either pimento or fresh red peppers with a little
    added inegar along with the cooked chicken. It is a great dish to use up
    the chicken left from making soup.

    Wendy


  6. #6
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    thanks, Lee
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j5kk4g$35i$[email protected]..
    > Storrmmee <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : now that is clever and i would like to know more, Lee
    > : "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > : news:j5ivvk$aje$[email protected]..
    > : > Storrmmee <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : >
    > : >
    > : >
    > : >
    > : > : you can spice this on both sides before rolling with the spices of
    > your
    > : > : choice, but dh cooks it plain because we try and get the hugest
    > turkey
    > : > : possible and after its roasted he cuts it into chuncks so we can
    > freeze
    > : > it.
    > : >
    > : > : once cold you can slice for sands or salads.
    > : >
    > : > : it reheats easily and you can also dice it for soup and other
    > alaking
    > : > type
    > : > : things... but i am guessing as i typed that its not kosher...
    > : >
    > : > This looks like it ould be good for a large buffet, so you wuld have
    > : > rether more even slices and can cut is easily.
    > : >
    > : > My mother used to make a chicken a la king with a veloute sauce(that's
    > : > cream sauce made with chicken stock instea of the milk) it was very
    > good,
    > : > too. I remember her putting pimento into it. You can get quite
    > ingenious
    > : > in making many dishes kosher by clever substitutions.
    > : >
    > : > Wendy
    >
    > It's quite simple. Take any chicken A LaKing recipe you like and use the
    > chicken soup or stock in place of the milk in the "cream" sauce. I use
    > sliced musrooms and either pimento or fresh red peppers with a little
    > added inegar along with the cooked chicken. It is a great dish to use up
    > the chicken left from making soup.
    >
    > Wendy
    >




  7. #7
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:9e5rodFo2dU1[email protected]..
    > the evenness of the slices as well as the presentation for a nice dinner
    > make this worthwhile... on the serving tray the nice golden brown crispy


    Especially if ones husband is doing the preparation and cooking of it. ;-)
    Unfortunately, my dh does not cook...ever.

    Cheri


  8. #8
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    what a drag, i found it more than attractive that he not only was willing to
    cook he loves it and is excellent at it, Lees
    "Cheri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> the evenness of the slices as well as the presentation for a nice dinner
    >> make this worthwhile... on the serving tray the nice golden brown crispy

    >
    > Especially if ones husband is doing the preparation and cooking of it. ;-)
    > Unfortunately, my dh does not cook...ever.
    >
    > Cheri




  9. #9
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 9/24/2011 9:54 AM, Cheri wrote:

    > Especially if ones husband is doing the preparation and cooking of it.
    > ;-) Unfortunately, my dh does not cook...ever.


    Mine used to, now he's down to omelettes, the occasional grilled cheese
    if I'm sick (on LC rye w/tomato) and prepping salad.

    I asked him to scrub the clams recently, and instead of using the brush
    I asked him to with water, he used the dish scrubber and Dawn liquid!

    You really wonder who the heck you've married at a moment like that. ;-)

    Susan

  10. #10
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    "Susan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > On 9/24/2011 9:54 AM, Cheri wrote:
    >
    >> Especially if ones husband is doing the preparation and cooking of it.
    >> ;-) Unfortunately, my dh does not cook...ever.

    >
    > Mine used to, now he's down to omelettes, the occasional grilled cheese
    > if I'm sick (on LC rye w/tomato) and prepping salad.
    >
    > I asked him to scrub the clams recently, and instead of using the brush I
    > asked him to with water, he used the dish scrubber and Dawn liquid!
    >
    > You really wonder who the heck you've married at a moment like that. ;-)
    >
    > Susan


    LOL, but Tom does make an excellent deep fried turkey. I had him helping
    with meatballs recently, telling him to make all about the same size, he
    made like 8 meatballs that filled the small pan, and had about a half cup of
    meat left over, and I kid you not, he asked me what he was supposed to do
    with the leftover meat. I didn't really say anything just told him to make
    the meatballs a little bigger. I know from being married to him for 47 years
    that he's an intelligent man...in most areas, but geez, had to smile to
    myself on that one.

    Cheri




  11. #11
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 9/24/2011 12:34 PM, Cheri wrote:

    > LOL, but Tom does make an excellent deep fried turkey. I had him helping
    > with meatballs recently, telling him to make all about the same size, he
    > made like 8 meatballs that filled the small pan, and had about a half
    > cup of meat left over, and I kid you not, he asked me what he was
    > supposed to do with the leftover meat.


    LITERALLY LOL!!! :-D

    > I didn't really say anything just
    > told him to make the meatballs a little bigger. I know from being
    > married to him for 47 years that he's an intelligent man...in most
    > areas, but geez, had to smile to myself on that one.


    Still LOL...

    Susan

  12. #12
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    I have come to the conclusion that intellegint, and always in the same
    deminsion are not the same, LOL, Lee
    "Cheri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Susan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> x-no-archive: yes
    >>
    >> On 9/24/2011 9:54 AM, Cheri wrote:
    >>
    >>> Especially if ones husband is doing the preparation and cooking of it.
    >>> ;-) Unfortunately, my dh does not cook...ever.

    >>
    >> Mine used to, now he's down to omelettes, the occasional grilled cheese
    >> if I'm sick (on LC rye w/tomato) and prepping salad.
    >>
    >> I asked him to scrub the clams recently, and instead of using the brush I
    >> asked him to with water, he used the dish scrubber and Dawn liquid!
    >>
    >> You really wonder who the heck you've married at a moment like that. ;-)
    >>
    >> Susan

    >
    > LOL, but Tom does make an excellent deep fried turkey. I had him helping
    > with meatballs recently, telling him to make all about the same size, he
    > made like 8 meatballs that filled the small pan, and had about a half cup
    > of meat left over, and I kid you not, he asked me what he was supposed to
    > do with the leftover meat. I didn't really say anything just told him to
    > make the meatballs a little bigger. I know from being married to him for
    > 47 years that he's an intelligent man...in most areas, but geez, had to
    > smile to myself on that one.
    >
    > Cheri
    >
    >
    >




  13. #13
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I have come to the conclusion that intellegint, and always in the same
    >deminsion are not the same, LOL, Lee


    Truly!

    Cheri


  14. #14
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: turkey rolls

    my dh has several, ok a LOT of IQ points on me, but there are times when
    things just get by him, lol, so glad its not in the food dept or we would
    both have starved by now, Lee
    "Cheri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>I have come to the conclusion that intellegint, and always in the same
    >>deminsion are not the same, LOL, Lee

    >
    > Truly!
    >
    > Cheri




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