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Thread: Thanksgiving

  1. #1
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Thanksgiving

    Just catching up and it sounds like everyone had a great day!

    We went to our friends home, and I brought three dishes along. They made
    the rest, and it was awesome. The lady in question has the most exquisite
    table settings you can imagine. Fabulous crystal glassware, silverware,
    and china that wouldn't be out of place to serve a monarch. It was just
    lovely.

    The only complaint is that they had turkey breast, which was sliced and
    swimming in some sort of broth. It became quite dry and flavorless that
    way. I prefer some dark meat, since it is moist. But there were so many
    wonderful dishes, and all of them were good, and the company was wonderful,
    and we always have a great time there. She had three incredible desserts.
    I managed to only take a tiny sliver of pumpkin pie.

    --

    Evelyn

    "Even as a mother protects with her life her only child, So with a boundless
    heart let one cherish all living beings." --Sutta Nipata 1.8


  2. #2
    Ozgirl Guest

    Default Re: Thanksgiving

    Evelyn wrote:
    > Just catching up and it sounds like everyone had a great day!
    >
    > We went to our friends home, and I brought three dishes along. They
    > made the rest, and it was awesome. The lady in question has the
    > most exquisite table settings you can imagine. Fabulous crystal
    > glassware, silverware, and china that wouldn't be out of place to
    > serve a monarch. It was just lovely.
    >
    > The only complaint is that they had turkey breast, which was sliced
    > and swimming in some sort of broth. It became quite dry and
    > flavorless that way. I prefer some dark meat, since it is moist. But
    > there were so many wonderful dishes, and all of them were good,
    > and the company was wonderful, and we always have a great time there.
    > She had three incredible desserts. I managed to only take a tiny
    > sliver of pumpkin pie.


    Sounds great. What were the sides?



  3. #3
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: Thanksgiving


    "Ozgirl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Evelyn wrote:
    >> Just catching up and it sounds like everyone had a great day!
    >>
    >> We went to our friends home, and I brought three dishes along. They
    >> made the rest, and it was awesome. The lady in question has the
    >> most exquisite table settings you can imagine. Fabulous crystal
    >> glassware, silverware, and china that wouldn't be out of place to
    >> serve a monarch. It was just lovely.
    >>
    >> The only complaint is that they had turkey breast, which was sliced
    >> and swimming in some sort of broth. It became quite dry and
    >> flavorless that way. I prefer some dark meat, since it is moist. But
    >> there were so many wonderful dishes, and all of them were good,
    >> and the company was wonderful, and we always have a great time there.
    >> She had three incredible desserts. I managed to only take a tiny
    >> sliver of pumpkin pie.

    >
    > Sounds great. What were the sides?


    OK let me see if I remember it all......
    Well first of all there were lots of appetizers and of course, cocktails....
    then there was the meal itself.

    There was turkey breast and gravy
    (A rather unique and tasty) stuffing made with lots of dried fruit.
    Buttered peas
    baked potatoes with sour cream and butter
    creamed onions
    sweet and sour red cabbage
    mashed sweet potato casserole
    cranberry orange relish
    canned cranberry sauce (for the purists)

    They had a nice selection of wines at the table too...

    For dessert there was;
    Pumpkin pie
    Mince pie
    Lemon Meringue pie

    And of course, coffee and cordials.

    The sweet potato casserole was topped with those little marshmallows melted
    on the top. I tried to scoop just a tiny bit from under the marshmallows.
    (I can't imagine ruining a perfectly good vegetable with that goo, but I
    think the hostess' daughter likes it that way). Also I make my stuffing a
    savory one, with lots of vegetables, seasonings and sausage meat, and this
    was tasty, but it was essentially more like bread and fruit, without the
    usual seasonings, so I took only a tiny bit to be polite, as I knew all that
    fruit wouldn't be kind to my diabetes. I stuck with the white wine and
    had no cordial, but I did take a very small sliver of pumpkin pie for
    dessert, and a tiny spoonful of each of the others just to taste how they
    were made.

    The pies were absolutely wonderful. Very good quality from a top bakery.

    The company was top notch.

    --

    Evelyn

    "Even as a mother protects with her life her only child, So with a boundless
    heart let one cherish all living beings." --Sutta Nipata 1.8


  4. #4
    Ozgirl Guest

    Default Re: Thanksgiving

    Your stuffing sounds more like mine. I can't imagine whoever thought putting
    marshmallows on a savoury dish would be a good thing, lol. Perhaps it was
    the only way to get kids to eat veggies way back then \

    How are creamed onions done?


    Evelyn wrote:
    > "Ozgirl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Evelyn wrote:
    >>> Just catching up and it sounds like everyone had a great day!
    >>>
    >>> We went to our friends home, and I brought three dishes along. They
    >>> made the rest, and it was awesome. The lady in question has
    >>> the most exquisite table settings you can imagine. Fabulous crystal
    >>> glassware, silverware, and china that wouldn't be out of place to
    >>> serve a monarch. It was just lovely.
    >>>
    >>> The only complaint is that they had turkey breast, which was sliced
    >>> and swimming in some sort of broth. It became quite dry and
    >>> flavorless that way. I prefer some dark meat, since it is moist. But
    >>> there were so many wonderful dishes, and all of them were good,
    >>> and the company was wonderful, and we always have a great time
    >>> there. She had three incredible desserts. I managed to only take a
    >>> tiny sliver of pumpkin pie.

    >>
    >> Sounds great. What were the sides?

    >
    > OK let me see if I remember it all......
    > Well first of all there were lots of appetizers and of course,
    > cocktails.... then there was the meal itself.
    >
    > There was turkey breast and gravy
    > (A rather unique and tasty) stuffing made with lots of dried fruit.
    > Buttered peas
    > baked potatoes with sour cream and butter
    > creamed onions
    > sweet and sour red cabbage
    > mashed sweet potato casserole
    > cranberry orange relish
    > canned cranberry sauce (for the purists)
    >
    > They had a nice selection of wines at the table too...
    >
    > For dessert there was;
    > Pumpkin pie
    > Mince pie
    > Lemon Meringue pie
    >
    > And of course, coffee and cordials.
    >
    > The sweet potato casserole was topped with those little marshmallows
    > melted on the top. I tried to scoop just a tiny bit from under the
    > marshmallows. (I can't imagine ruining a perfectly good vegetable
    > with that goo, but I think the hostess' daughter likes it that way). Also
    > I make my stuffing a savory one, with lots of vegetables,
    > seasonings and sausage meat, and this was tasty, but it was
    > essentially more like bread and fruit, without the usual seasonings,
    > so I took only a tiny bit to be polite, as I knew all that fruit
    > wouldn't be kind to my diabetes. I stuck with the white wine and
    > had no cordial, but I did take a very small sliver of pumpkin pie for
    > dessert, and a tiny spoonful of each of the others just to taste how
    > they were made.
    > The pies were absolutely wonderful. Very good quality from a top
    > bakery.
    > The company was top notch.




  5. #5
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: Thanksgiving


    "Ozgirl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Your stuffing sounds more like mine. I can't imagine whoever thought
    > putting marshmallows on a savoury dish would be a good thing, lol. Perhaps
    > it was the only way to get kids to eat veggies way back then \
    >
    > How are creamed onions done?



    You buy the smallish white onions, (probably about 2 inches across or so for
    the largest). You bring a big pot of water to a boil and drop the onions
    in for a few minutes...... like about 5 minutes. Then you scoop them out
    and into a big bowl of cold water. Then I sit at the table and patiently
    peel them. You make sure when you peel them that you leave the top and
    bottom end pretty much intact, but trim only the tiniest bit off. That
    keeps them from coming apart when cooked. You can then reserve them for
    another day, maybe overnight or so.

    Day of preparation, you boil the onions in water gently till they are tender
    then drain.

    For the sauce, in a saucepan you melt a few tablespoons of butter and add
    salt, pepper, nutmeg and possibly some parsley to the butter, then add plain
    white flour to soak up all the butter. Add milk to that, and keep
    stirring over heat till the sauce thickens. If you need to add more milk,
    do so. Just enough to make a nice cream sauce. Add the cream sauce over
    the onions.

    BTW..... I find this doesn't bother my BG's much because you get very little
    flour in each serving of onions. You don't need a lot because everyone
    just usually takes one or two. My husband loves them and takes more than
    anyone :-)

    --

    Evelyn

    "Even as a mother protects with her life her only child, So with a boundless
    heart let one cherish all living beings." --Sutta Nipata 1.8


  6. #6
    Ozgirl Guest

    Default Re: Thanksgiving

    Evelyn wrote:
    > "Ozgirl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Your stuffing sounds more like mine. I can't imagine whoever thought
    >> putting marshmallows on a savoury dish would be a good thing, lol.
    >> Perhaps it was the only way to get kids to eat veggies way back then
    >> \ How are creamed onions done?

    >
    >
    > You buy the smallish white onions, (probably about 2 inches across or
    > so for the largest). You bring a big pot of water to a boil and
    > drop the onions in for a few minutes...... like about 5 minutes. Then you
    > scoop them out and into a big bowl of cold water. Then I
    > sit at the table and patiently peel them. You make sure when you
    > peel them that you leave the top and bottom end pretty much intact,
    > but trim only the tiniest bit off. That keeps them from coming
    > apart when cooked. You can then reserve them for another day,
    > maybe overnight or so.
    > Day of preparation, you boil the onions in water gently till they are
    > tender then drain.
    >
    > For the sauce, in a saucepan you melt a few tablespoons of butter and
    > add salt, pepper, nutmeg and possibly some parsley to the butter,
    > then add plain white flour to soak up all the butter. Add milk to
    > that, and keep stirring over heat till the sauce thickens. If you
    > need to add more milk, do so. Just enough to make a nice cream
    > sauce. Add the cream sauce over the onions.
    >
    > BTW..... I find this doesn't bother my BG's much because you get very
    > little flour in each serving of onions. You don't need a lot
    > because everyone just usually takes one or two. My husband loves
    > them and takes more than anyone :-)


    Ok, so your basic parsley sauce. The same as I would do for boiled corned
    beef. Those onions would go nicely with that, share the same sauce, lol. I
    have always done mashed potato with corned beef as well. I made potato pie
    last night and it didn't raise my bg.

    I boiled mince (ground beef) in water with onions til cooked and then
    drained that fatty water off. I then added a bit more water, some powdered
    gravy (meant to add a can of tomatoes and forgot) some frozen veggies
    (broccoli, carrot and beans - an attempt to get the kids to eat more
    veggies), a bit of Worcestershire and some bbq sauce and topped it with a
    layer of mashed potato (frozen mash - it was really hot and humid yesterday
    and I didn't want to be in the kitchen too long). My son whined about there
    being no pastry base - as I usually do when making this. I was going to do a
    chicken and veg dish for me but ended up just eating the "pie" because of
    the heat.



  7. #7
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: Thanksgiving


    "Ozgirl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Evelyn wrote:
    >> "Ozgirl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> Your stuffing sounds more like mine. I can't imagine whoever thought
    >>> putting marshmallows on a savoury dish would be a good thing, lol.
    >>> Perhaps it was the only way to get kids to eat veggies way back then
    >>> \ How are creamed onions done?

    >>
    >>
    >> You buy the smallish white onions, (probably about 2 inches across or
    >> so for the largest). You bring a big pot of water to a boil and
    >> drop the onions in for a few minutes...... like about 5 minutes. Then
    >> you scoop them out and into a big bowl of cold water. Then I
    >> sit at the table and patiently peel them. You make sure when you
    >> peel them that you leave the top and bottom end pretty much intact,
    >> but trim only the tiniest bit off. That keeps them from coming
    >> apart when cooked. You can then reserve them for another day,
    >> maybe overnight or so.
    >> Day of preparation, you boil the onions in water gently till they are
    >> tender then drain.
    >>
    >> For the sauce, in a saucepan you melt a few tablespoons of butter and
    >> add salt, pepper, nutmeg and possibly some parsley to the butter,
    >> then add plain white flour to soak up all the butter. Add milk to
    >> that, and keep stirring over heat till the sauce thickens. If you
    >> need to add more milk, do so. Just enough to make a nice cream
    >> sauce. Add the cream sauce over the onions.
    >>
    >> BTW..... I find this doesn't bother my BG's much because you get very
    >> little flour in each serving of onions. You don't need a lot
    >> because everyone just usually takes one or two. My husband loves
    >> them and takes more than anyone :-)

    >
    > Ok, so your basic parsley sauce. The same as I would do for boiled corned
    > beef. Those onions would go nicely with that, share the same sauce, lol.
    > I have always done mashed potato with corned beef as well. I made potato
    > pie last night and it didn't raise my bg.
    >
    > I boiled mince (ground beef) in water with onions til cooked and then
    > drained that fatty water off. I then added a bit more water, some powdered
    > gravy (meant to add a can of tomatoes and forgot) some frozen veggies
    > (broccoli, carrot and beans - an attempt to get the kids to eat more
    > veggies), a bit of Worcestershire and some bbq sauce and topped it with a
    > layer of mashed potato (frozen mash - it was really hot and humid
    > yesterday and I didn't want to be in the kitchen too long). My son whined
    > about there being no pastry base - as I usually do when making this. I was
    > going to do a chicken and veg dish for me but ended up just eating the
    > "pie" because of the heat.



    Sounds a lot like shepherds pie!

    When you drain off that fat and water, you also lose a lot of flavor.

    I would try sauteeing the beef and onions first, draining the fat off then,
    and THEN adding some water to get the delicious crusty bits off the bottom
    of the pan, where all the flavor is.

    --

    Evelyn

    "Even as a mother protects with her life her only child, So with a boundless
    heart let one cherish all living beings." --Sutta Nipata 1.8


  8. #8
    Ricavito Guest

    Default clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    On Nov 28, 7:14*pm, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Just catching up and it sounds like everyone had a great day!
    >
    > We went to our friends home, and I brought three dishes along. * They made
    > the rest, and it was awesome. * The lady in question has the most exquisite
    > table settings you can imagine. * *Fabulous crystal glassware, silverware,
    > and china that wouldn't be out of place to serve a monarch. * *It wasjust
    > lovely.
    >
    > The only complaint is that they had turkey breast, which was sliced and
    > swimming in some sort of broth. * It became quite dry and flavorless that
    > way. * I prefer some dark meat, since it is moist. * But there were so many
    > wonderful dishes, and all of them were good, and the company was wonderful,
    > and we always have a great time there. * She had three incredible desserts.
    > I managed to only take a tiny sliver of pumpkin pie.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Evelyn
    >
    > "Even as a mother protects with her life her only child, So with a boundless
    > heart let one cherish all living beings." --Sutta Nipata 1.8


    Sounds like you had a lovely Thanksgiving, all the more so for being
    spent with friends. We went to a sister's home and helped in the
    kitchen--there were 25+ for a Thanksgiving+ celebration, so it took a
    lot of hands to pull off. That is my favorite part anyway, being in
    the kitchen with some of my loved ones, cooking for other loved
    ones :-)

    I brought along a clementine cake, which would have been a relatively
    low carb dessert, as desserts go, except that I chickened out at the
    last minute and used sugar rather than splenda as planned. I had a
    tiny piece of that, and a huge piece of definitely high-carb birthday
    cake too, oink oink :-)

    Here is the clementine cake recipe, if anyone is interested. I used
    Nigella Lawson's recipe and made a few changes--but chickened out on
    subbing splenda.


    Ingredients:
    5-6 unpeeled clementines (about 1 pound)
    6 eggs
    sweetner equivalent to 2/3 cup of sugar
    2 1/3 cups almond flour
    1 heaping teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon vanilla

    Cooking Directions:
    Wash the clementines, put them in a pot with water to cover, and
    simmer at a low boil for about 2-3 hours

    When the clementines are soft and the house smells of oranges, drain
    them, allow them to cool and remove the seeds (they will pretty much
    fall apart, so do this over a plate). Put the whole fruits in a food
    processor and whirl briefly (or you could chop them finely by hand, as
    they are very soft). There will be a lot of juice, and I set that
    aside and did not add to the cake.

    Beat the eggs in a large bowl, add sweetner, almond flour, and baking
    powder, and finally the chopped clementines.

    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Butter and line an 8-inch spring
    form pan.

    Pour intp an 8-inch spring form pan that is well buttered and also
    lined--this cake is really sticky. Bake for about 1 hour, until a
    toothpick in the middle comes out clean. After the firt 30-40
    minutes, you might need to cover the top with aluminum foil to keep it
    from browning too much.

    Remove from the oven and cool in the pan before trying to remove.
    Based on Nigella's recommendation, I made my two days early and kept
    in the fridge, well wrapped. It makes a very moist cake. I served
    mine dusted with bitter chocolate and shaved peel, and next time I
    might try a little creme fraiche instead. It is great served in small
    portions with strong coffee.

    I would not cook this again though unless I felt confident in a no
    carb sweetner that would work for baking. What about using one of the
    flavored da Vinci syrups? Or maybe a combination of erythritol and
    splenda. I also like acesulfame-K, if I can find it, but can you bake
    with it? Would not using sugar make the cake rise less?


  9. #9
    Stormmee Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    as i was reading this and drooling i was thinking the splenda with fiber
    might be a good choice so the volume is there, Lee

    --
    Have a wonderful day

    "Ricavito" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Nov 28, 7:14 pm, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Just catching up and it sounds like everyone had a great day!
    >
    > We went to our friends home, and I brought three dishes along. They made
    > the rest, and it was awesome. The lady in question has the most exquisite
    > table settings you can imagine. Fabulous crystal glassware, silverware,
    > and china that wouldn't be out of place to serve a monarch. It was just
    > lovely.
    >
    > The only complaint is that they had turkey breast, which was sliced and
    > swimming in some sort of broth. It became quite dry and flavorless that
    > way. I prefer some dark meat, since it is moist. But there were so many
    > wonderful dishes, and all of them were good, and the company was
    > wonderful,
    > and we always have a great time there. She had three incredible desserts.
    > I managed to only take a tiny sliver of pumpkin pie.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Evelyn
    >
    > "Even as a mother protects with her life her only child, So with a
    > boundless
    > heart let one cherish all living beings." --Sutta Nipata 1.8


    Sounds like you had a lovely Thanksgiving, all the more so for being
    spent with friends. We went to a sister's home and helped in the
    kitchen--there were 25+ for a Thanksgiving+ celebration, so it took a
    lot of hands to pull off. That is my favorite part anyway, being in
    the kitchen with some of my loved ones, cooking for other loved
    ones :-)

    I brought along a clementine cake, which would have been a relatively
    low carb dessert, as desserts go, except that I chickened out at the
    last minute and used sugar rather than splenda as planned. I had a
    tiny piece of that, and a huge piece of definitely high-carb birthday
    cake too, oink oink :-)

    Here is the clementine cake recipe, if anyone is interested. I used
    Nigella Lawson's recipe and made a few changes--but chickened out on
    subbing splenda.


    Ingredients:
    5-6 unpeeled clementines (about 1 pound)
    6 eggs
    sweetner equivalent to 2/3 cup of sugar
    2 1/3 cups almond flour
    1 heaping teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon vanilla

    Cooking Directions:
    Wash the clementines, put them in a pot with water to cover, and
    simmer at a low boil for about 2-3 hours

    When the clementines are soft and the house smells of oranges, drain
    them, allow them to cool and remove the seeds (they will pretty much
    fall apart, so do this over a plate). Put the whole fruits in a food
    processor and whirl briefly (or you could chop them finely by hand, as
    they are very soft). There will be a lot of juice, and I set that
    aside and did not add to the cake.

    Beat the eggs in a large bowl, add sweetner, almond flour, and baking
    powder, and finally the chopped clementines.

    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Butter and line an 8-inch spring
    form pan.

    Pour intp an 8-inch spring form pan that is well buttered and also
    lined--this cake is really sticky. Bake for about 1 hour, until a
    toothpick in the middle comes out clean. After the firt 30-40
    minutes, you might need to cover the top with aluminum foil to keep it
    from browning too much.

    Remove from the oven and cool in the pan before trying to remove.
    Based on Nigella's recommendation, I made my two days early and kept
    in the fridge, well wrapped. It makes a very moist cake. I served
    mine dusted with bitter chocolate and shaved peel, and next time I
    might try a little creme fraiche instead. It is great served in small
    portions with strong coffee.

    I would not cook this again though unless I felt confident in a no
    carb sweetner that would work for baking. What about using one of the
    flavored da Vinci syrups? Or maybe a combination of erythritol and
    splenda. I also like acesulfame-K, if I can find it, but can you bake
    with it? Would not using sugar make the cake rise less?



  10. #10
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    x-no-archive: yes

    Ricavito wrote:

    > I would not cook this again though unless I felt confident in a no
    > carb sweetner that would work for baking. What about using one of the
    > flavored da Vinci syrups? Or maybe a combination of erythritol and
    > splenda. I also like acesulfame-K, if I can find it, but can you bake
    > with it? Would not using sugar make the cake rise less?
    >


    I think you made the right choice, since a lot of folks (me included)
    get a terrible taste and mouth feel from Splenda. Also, the bulking
    agent makes it really carby, and the oranges are already loaded with sugar.

    I've made this cake in the past by blending sweeteners; you get more
    sweetening and less of the bad effects this way. I can use half liquid
    sucralose (sweetzfree.com) mixed with xylitol, Diabetisweet, erythritol
    without bad taste or texture effects. Even just blending xylitol with
    liquid sucralose cuts the carbs a LOT.

    I love Nigella, though her damp apple cake didn't work for me the first
    time very well.

    Susan

  11. #11
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    Ricavito <[email protected]> wrote:

    : I brought along a clementine cake, which would have been a relatively
    : low carb dessert, as desserts go, except that I chickened out at the
    : last minute and used sugar rather than splenda as planned. I had a
    : tiny piece of that, and a huge piece of definitely high-carb birthday
    : cake too, oink oink :-)

    After looking at the recipe, I would say tht sugar would not make a big
    difference in this cake as it would in a normal layer cake, etc. ther
    eis no chemical magic here, involving rising that might require or just be
    much better, with sugar as opposed to artificial sweetener. I woudl use
    Splenda or a aesculfane sweetener in place of the sugar and it should come
    out about the same.


    : Here is the clementine cake recipe, if anyone is interested. I used
    : Nigella Lawson's recipe and made a few changes--but chickened out on
    : subbing splenda.


    : Ingredients:
    : 5-6 unpeeled clementines (about 1 pound)
    : 6 eggs
    : sweetner equivalent to 2/3 cup of sugar
    : 2 1/3 cups almond flour
    : 1 heaping teaspoon baking powder
    : 1 teaspoon vanilla

    Wendy

  12. #12
    Ricavito Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    On Dec 1, 7:20*am, Susan <su...@nothanks.org> wrote:
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > Ricavito wrote:
    > > I would not cook this again though unless I felt confident in a no
    > > carb sweetner that would work for baking. *What about using one of the
    > > flavored da Vinci syrups? *Or maybe a combination of erythritol and
    > > splenda. *I also like acesulfame-K, if I can find it, but can you bake
    > > with it? *Would not using sugar make the cake rise less?

    >
    > I think you made the right choice, since a lot of folks (me included)
    > get a terrible taste and mouth feel from Splenda. *Also, the bulking
    > agent makes it really carby, and the oranges are already loaded with sugar.
    >
    > I've made this cake in the past by blending sweeteners; you get more
    > sweetening and less of the bad effects this way. *I can use half liquid
    > sucralose (sweetzfree.com) mixed with xylitol, Diabetisweet, erythritol
    > without bad taste or texture effects. *Even just blending xylitol with
    > liquid sucralose cuts the carbs a LOT.
    >
    > I love Nigella, though her damp apple cake didn't work for me the first
    > time very well.
    >
    > Susan


    That is a quite a good idea, to blend a number of sweeteners. I was
    googling various sweeteners after posting this last night, and came
    across some opinions that blending with this many different sweeteners
    avoids a discernable aftertaste.

    I think Nigella's original recipe was for a full cup of sugar, but I
    used 2/3 and thought that was plenty sweet. A lot of the reviews
    mentioned that the cake was bitter, but I certainly did not find it so
    even cutting the sugar content. Maybe it was because I forgot about
    the clementines and boiled the beejeezus out of them.

    I believe the ratio of sweetener to sugar I have heard is about 3 to 1
    (e.g., 1/3 cup of sweetener would substitute for 1 cup of sugar).
    Does that sound right to you?

  13. #13
    Ricavito Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    On Dec 1, 8:13*am, "W. Baker" <wba...@panix.com> wrote:

    >
    > After looking at the recipe, I would say tht sugar would not make a big
    > difference in this cake as it would in a *normal layer cake, etc. *ther
    > eis no chemical magic here, involving rising that might require or just be
    > much better, with sugar as opposed to artificial sweetener. *I woudl use
    > Splenda or a aesculfane sweetener in place of the sugar and it should come
    > out about the same. *
    >


    >
    > Wendy


    Thanks Wendy, I think I might try this again for the end of year
    holidays. I'm going to try a blend of 3-4 sweeteners....now the trick
    for me will be to figure out how much I should use. The general rule
    of thumb I have heard is a 3 to 1 ratio (substitute 1/3 cup of
    sweetener to 1 cup of sugar). Does that sound about right? Somehow
    that seems like a lot, and I would rather err on the less sweet
    side.

  14. #14
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    x-no-archive: yes

    Ricavito wrote:

    > That is a quite a good idea, to blend a number of sweeteners. I was
    > googling various sweeteners after posting this last night, and came
    > across some opinions that blending with this many different sweeteners
    > avoids a discernable aftertaste.


    Yep, and I can't take credit for the idea. I read about it on the once
    busy and creative low carb newsgroup.

    >
    > I think Nigella's original recipe was for a full cup of sugar, but I
    > used 2/3 and thought that was plenty sweet. A lot of the reviews
    > mentioned that the cake was bitter, but I certainly did not find it so
    > even cutting the sugar content. Maybe it was because I forgot about
    > the clementines and boiled the beejeezus out of them.


    I always cut sweetener by at least 1/4; I hate uber sweetness.

    >
    > I believe the ratio of sweetener to sugar I have heard is about 3 to 1
    > (e.g., 1/3 cup of sweetener would substitute for 1 cup of sugar).
    > Does that sound right to you?


    It completely depends upon what you're using; liquid sucralose is wildly
    concentrated for instance, I think 8 drops is sweet as 1/4 C of sugar,
    for instance, and zero calorie, zero carb. I use it to lower the carb
    count of xylitol and other sweeteners.

    Susan

  15. #15
    Ricavito Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    On Dec 1, 4:44*am, "Stormmee" <rgr...@consolidated.net> wrote:
    > as i was reading this and drooling i was thinking the splenda with fiber
    > might be a good choice so the volume is there, Lee
    >
    > --
    > Have a wonderful day
    >

    Thanks Stormee, I was wondering that too. The cake is fairly dense
    and maybe just a smidgen more baking powder would make it fluffier.
    I'm thinking to use a blend of sweeteners because from what I read on
    the internet (LOL) that seems to be a good way to avoid any of the
    aftertastes associated with the various sweeteners.

  16. #16
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    Ricavito <[email protected]> wrote:
    : On Dec 1, 8:13?am, "W. Baker" <wba...@panix.com> wrote:

    : >
    : > After looking at the recipe, I would say tht sugar would not make a big
    : > difference in this cake as it would in a ?normal layer cake, etc. ?ther
    : > eis no chemical magic here, involving rising that might require or just be
    : > much better, with sugar as opposed to artificial sweetener. ?I woudl use
    : > Splenda or a aesculfane sweetener in place of the sugar and it should come
    : > out about the same. ?
    : >

    : >
    : > Wendy

    : Thanks Wendy, I think I might try this again for the end of year
    : holidays. I'm going to try a blend of 3-4 sweeteners....now the trick
    : for me will be to figure out how much I should use. The general rule
    : of thumb I have heard is a 3 to 1 ratio (substitute 1/3 cup of
    : sweetener to 1 cup of sugar). Does that sound about right? Somehow
    : that seems like a lot, and I would rather err on the less sweet
    : side.

    I usually use the Splenda that mesures like sugar and I use a bit less
    than I would for the sugar, but definitely not 1/3 as much. I tink you
    will have to taste the batter and see how it tastes to you. When Imade
    my cranberry cause for his thanksgiving the recipe called for 2 C of sugar
    and I used about a cup and a half and the sauce was not too sweet, but had
    a nice tang. I must say that when I taste , say some "real" sugared jam
    it now tastes much too sweet for me. I prefer my homeemade jams sweetened
    when I open the jar with packets of sweetener.

    Wendy

  17. #17
    Stormmmee Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    I WILL PROBABLY STICK WITH THE SPLENDA, I AM ALLERGIC TO SO MANY OF THEM I
    HATE TAKING THE RISK, lEE

    --
    Have a great day
    "Ricavito" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Dec 1, 4:44 am, "Stormmee" <rgr...@consolidated.net> wrote:
    > as i was reading this and drooling i was thinking the splenda with fiber
    > might be a good choice so the volume is there, Lee
    >
    > --
    > Have a wonderful day
    >

    Thanks Stormee, I was wondering that too. The cake is fairly dense
    and maybe just a smidgen more baking powder would make it fluffier.
    I'm thinking to use a blend of sweeteners because from what I read on
    the internet (LOL) that seems to be a good way to avoid any of the
    aftertastes associated with the various sweeteners.



  18. #18
    Stormmmee Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    so te liquid doesn't give you the after taste of te powder... cat is helping
    type this morning, Lee

    --
    Have a great day
    "Susan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > Ricavito wrote:
    >
    >> That is a quite a good idea, to blend a number of sweeteners. I was
    >> googling various sweeteners after posting this last night, and came
    >> across some opinions that blending with this many different sweeteners
    >> avoids a discernable aftertaste.

    >
    > Yep, and I can't take credit for the idea. I read about it on the once
    > busy and creative low carb newsgroup.
    >
    >>
    >> I think Nigella's original recipe was for a full cup of sugar, but I
    >> used 2/3 and thought that was plenty sweet. A lot of the reviews
    >> mentioned that the cake was bitter, but I certainly did not find it so
    >> even cutting the sugar content. Maybe it was because I forgot about
    >> the clementines and boiled the beejeezus out of them.

    >
    > I always cut sweetener by at least 1/4; I hate uber sweetness.
    >
    >>
    >> I believe the ratio of sweetener to sugar I have heard is about 3 to 1
    >> (e.g., 1/3 cup of sweetener would substitute for 1 cup of sugar).
    >> Does that sound right to you?

    >
    > It completely depends upon what you're using; liquid sucralose is wildly
    > concentrated for instance, I think 8 drops is sweet as 1/4 C of sugar, for
    > instance, and zero calorie, zero carb. I use it to lower the carb count
    > of xylitol and other sweeteners.
    >
    > Susan




  19. #19
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    x-no-archive: yes

    W. Baker wrote:

    > I usually use the Splenda that mesures like sugar and I use a bit less
    > than I would for the sugar, but definitely not 1/3 as much. I tink you
    > will have to taste the batter and see how it tastes to you. When Imade
    > my cranberry cause for his thanksgiving the recipe called for 2 C of sugar
    > and I used about a cup and a half and the sauce was not too sweet, but had
    > a nice tang. I must say that when I taste , say some "real" sugared jam
    > it now tastes much too sweet for me. I prefer my homeemade jams sweetened
    > when I open the jar with packets of sweetener.



    Wendy and others; for recipes where you don't need the bulking effect,
    consider buying liquid sucralose (Splenda) from sweetzfree.com. It has
    zero carbs and calories, and you avoid the uber glycemic maltodextrin
    bulking carbs in granular Splenda.

    It's so intensely concentrated that one little bottle has lasted years
    in my house (but I don't cook/bake a lot of sweets).

    Susan

  20. #20
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: clementine cake recipe Re: Thanksgiving

    "Susan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    > It completely depends upon what you're using; liquid sucralose is wildly
    > concentrated for instance, I think 8 drops is sweet as 1/4 C of sugar, for
    > instance, and zero calorie, zero carb. I use it to lower the carb count
    > of xylitol and other sweeteners.
    >
    > Susan


    Yep, I'm still working on a bottle that I got a couple of years ago. I don't
    get an aftertaste with it, like I do with Splenda.

    Cheri



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