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Thread: ping wendy and evelyn ot

  1. #1
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default ping wendy and evelyn ot

    i was talking to a firend tonight and neither of us have ever seen matsa
    ball, sp soup in a prepared package, is there such a thing and if so what
    brand/where would she get it? Lee



  2. #2
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot


    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >i was talking to a firend tonight and neither of us have ever seen matsa
    >ball, sp soup in a prepared package, is there such a thing and if so what
    >brand/where would she get it? Lee


    http://www.amazon.com/MANISCHEWITZ-M.../dp/B001EO5X7G

    Should be in the Jewish section of any grocery store.



  3. #3
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    we only have "an ethnic" section here in the midwest... mostly asian and
    mexican some indian no jewish or italian in that section... but then most of
    our groceries are walmart or small independents, might be a section in one
    of the upscale ones in st louis, but i will send her this link for amazon,
    never even thought to look there, Lee
    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j7dr6t$fv7$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>i was talking to a firend tonight and neither of us have ever seen matsa
    >>ball, sp soup in a prepared package, is there such a thing and if so what
    >>brand/where would she get it? Lee

    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/MANISCHEWITZ-M.../dp/B001EO5X7G
    >
    > Should be in the Jewish section of any grocery store.
    >




  4. #4
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    Storrmmee <[email protected]> wrote:
    : i was talking to a firend tonight and neither of us have ever seen matsa
    : ball, sp soup in a prepared package, is there such a thing and if so what
    : brand/where would she get it? Lee

    Matzo ball soup in a package, which I have never used, should be a packet
    of a mix that you make into matzo balls by following instructions and a
    packed of a dehydrated soup mix that is probably quite salty. I generally
    make my own matzo balls from a recipe and add them to my home make chicken
    soup.

    There are matxo ball mix in boxes without the soup packet, which some
    poeple say are vry good. You could than put them(once cooked) into your
    own soup or a boxed chicken soup of yur choice.

    The brands I see are Manishevitz(sp?) Goodmans, and several others of
    much smaller brands.

    Wendy

  5. #5
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 00:07:47 -0500, "Storrmmee"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >i was talking to a firend tonight and neither of us have ever seen matsa
    >ball, sp soup in a prepared package, is there such a thing and if so what
    >brand/where would she get it? Lee



    Lee,

    All it is, is plain, good-quality chicken broth, but you have to make
    the Matzo balls yourself. I buy Streits Matzo meal in the Jewish
    food section of the supermarket and follow the recipe right on the
    box. It is very simple to do, but there are some tricks.

    Basically You beat the eggs, add a little water and salt and pepper to
    that, then put in the Matzo meal and some melted butter, blend it
    together and then allow it to sit in the fridge for a good half hour
    while the matzo meal soaks up the eggs. The mixture thickens up
    while it sits.

    Then you bring your broth to a boil and with WET hands, form the
    mixture into small balls and drop them into the simmering soup. It
    is time consuming, since you may need to re-wet your hands from time
    to time, and you can't cheat on the size either... they swell up as
    they cook, so keep them small.

    Cover the pot and simmer gently till they are done.

    This recipe, with the exact amounts, is on the box. Also, I use
    melted butter in them, which is NOT properly Kosher, if that is
    important to you. The recipe usually calls for melted chicken fat.
    If you have some on hand, that is perfect.

    I also do NOT cook them in the broth, but in a separate pot of boiling
    salted water, since they tend to soak up all the broth. Then
    afterwards I add them to the broth and serve.

    It is absolutely delicious.

    A neighbor of mine makes something similar with dumplings made of egg
    and farina. The taste is almost exactly the same, but the matzo
    balls are probably easier to make.

    Evelyn


  6. #6
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    On Sat, 15 Oct 2011 22:48:12 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >>i was talking to a firend tonight and neither of us have ever seen matsa
    >>ball, sp soup in a prepared package, is there such a thing and if so what
    >>brand/where would she get it? Lee

    >
    >http://www.amazon.com/MANISCHEWITZ-M.../dp/B001EO5X7G
    >
    >Should be in the Jewish section of any grocery store.



    I haven't had such good luck with their matzo meal, but the Streit's
    is perfect.

    Evelyn

  7. #7
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 01:12:33 -0500, "Storrmmee"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >we only have "an ethnic" section here in the midwest... mostly asian and
    >mexican some indian no jewish or italian in that section... but then most of
    >our groceries are walmart or small independents, might be a section in one
    >of the upscale ones in st louis, but i will send her this link for amazon,
    >never even thought to look there, Lee



    Lee, this is a reasonable alternative with similar ingredients and
    similar taste. These are the farina dumplings I mentioned in my
    other posting.

    FARINA SOUP DUMPLINGS
    6 tbsp. soft butter
    4 med. eggs
    12 heaping tbsp. reg. farina
    2 1/2 to 3 qts. chicken or beef stock

    In a bowl, mix by hand the butter and eggs. Gradually add farina and
    mix until well blended. Let sit 25 to 30 minutes. Spoon batter, a
    generous teaspoon at a time, into simmering soup stock. Hold spoon in
    stock for a second or two, the dumplings will fall from the spoon more
    quickly. Cover and simmer dumplings until light and fluffy, 35 to 40
    minutes.

  8. #8
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    Evelyn <[email protected]> wrote:
    : On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 00:07:47 -0500, "Storrmmee"
    : <[email protected]> wrote:

    : >i was talking to a firend tonight and neither of us have ever seen matsa
    : >ball, sp soup in a prepared package, is there such a thing and if so what
    : >brand/where would she get it? Lee


    : Lee,

    : All it is, is plain, good-quality chicken broth, but you have to make
    : the Matzo balls yourself. I buy Streits Matzo meal in the Jewish
    : food section of the supermarket and follow the recipe right on the
    : box. It is very simple to do, but there are some tricks.

    : Basically You beat the eggs, add a little water and salt and pepper to
    : that, then put in the Matzo meal and some melted butter, blend it
    : together and then allow it to sit in the fridge for a good half hour
    : while the matzo meal soaks up the eggs. The mixture thickens up
    : while it sits.

    : Then you bring your broth to a boil and with WET hands, form the
    : mixture into small balls and drop them into the simmering soup. It
    : is time consuming, since you may need to re-wet your hands from time
    : to time, and you can't cheat on the size either... they swell up as
    : they cook, so keep them small.

    : Cover the pot and simmer gently till they are done.

    : This recipe, with the exact amounts, is on the box. Also, I use
    : melted butter in them, which is NOT properly Kosher, if that is
    : important to you. The recipe usually calls for melted chicken fat.
    : If you have some on hand, that is perfect.

    : I also do NOT cook them in the broth, but in a separate pot of boiling
    : salted water, since they tend to soak up all the broth. Then
    : afterwards I add them to the broth and serve.

    : It is absolutely delicious.

    : A neighbor of mine makes something similar with dumplings made of egg
    : and farina. The taste is almost exactly the same, but the matzo
    : balls are probably easier to make.

    : Evelyn

    I hold with what Evelyn says, except for that butter, which, IMHO woul
    dchange the tste. You can us, eithe rmelted rendered chicken fat(the
    original) or us a not highly flavor oil and use some chicken soup powder
    in place of the slt in the recipe.

    I also always boil my matzo balls in a large pot, very full of water, not
    th soup, as it uses up all yur soup:-) Keep the pot covered if you want
    them nice and light and don't crowd the pot.

    Wendy

  9. #9
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    There is no such thing as "matzo ball soup" It is chicken broth with
    matzo meal dumplings.

    Never cook matzo balls in the soup.*

    I use rendered chicken fat** for my matzo balls, too. The trick is to
    refrigerate the mixture for at least 45 minutes. Most times I make the
    mixture a day ahead and keep it in the fridge until ready to use.

    They should be rolled into golf ball size or smaller, with wet hands and
    put into rapidly boiling water which has a little salt in it. Be very
    gentle with the matzo balls. Just get them round and don't handle the
    mixture too much.

    When all the balls are in the pot, lower the heat to a slow boil, cover
    and cook undisturbed for 45 minutes.

    While the matzo balls are cooking, heat your soup/broth to luke warm.
    When the matzo balls are done, remove them one at a time with a slotted
    spoon and put them into the soup. Continue to heat the soup to desired
    serving temp.

    The colder the matzo meal mix and the length of slow boiling the matzo
    balls are what makes for fluffy matzo balls.

    The recipe on the matzo meal box is just fine. I add white pepper and a
    tiny pinch of freshly grated nutmeg to mine.

    Now you know the secrets of the Harlingen, TX "Matzo Ball Queen" who has
    been feeding them to 80+ congregants every year at our communal seder. :-)

    *The fat in the matzo balls cooks out during the cooking process and
    that will make your soup greasy. You can see it in the water.

    **To make chicken fat, save the fat from around the cavity of a whole
    chicken or from the skin of chicken breasts. Just freeze it in a baggie.
    It keeps forever. Keep adding more fat clumps and fatty skin to the
    baggie and refreeze.

    When you have about half a pound, let it thaw slightly and cut it into
    small pieces. (partially frozen fat cuts better)

    Place the pieces (skins also good) into a small, heavy sauce pan. Add a
    tablespoon of water and heat until the pieces of skin floating on the
    top (cracklings or gribbeness) start to turn golden and the fat is
    rendered into liquid. Add a tablespoon of finely chopped onion and
    continue to cook until the onion starts to brown. Remove from the heat
    and strain the fat into a heatproof glass measuring cup. Wren cool, you
    can transfer it to refrigerator container. It will keep in the fridge
    for eternity.
    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  10. #10
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    thanks, perhaps i should have just asked for the ball/soup recipe in the
    first place, Lee
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j7er9g$m5i$[email protected]..
    > Storrmmee <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : i was talking to a firend tonight and neither of us have ever seen matsa
    > : ball, sp soup in a prepared package, is there such a thing and if so
    > what
    > : brand/where would she get it? Lee
    >
    > Matzo ball soup in a package, which I have never used, should be a packet
    > of a mix that you make into matzo balls by following instructions and a
    > packed of a dehydrated soup mix that is probably quite salty. I generally
    > make my own matzo balls from a recipe and add them to my home make chicken
    > soup.
    >
    > There are matxo ball mix in boxes without the soup packet, which some
    > poeple say are vry good. You could than put them(once cooked) into your
    > own soup or a boxed chicken soup of yur choice.
    >
    > The brands I see are Manishevitz(sp?) Goodmans, and several others of
    > much smaller brands.
    >
    > Wendy




  11. #11
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    thanks so much, kosher isn't a strict thing although she is interested in
    that from a cultural study sort of perspective, last year she went to a
    sater, sp meal hosted by a friends church in an interdenominational program,
    she is as fascinated with diverse cultures as i am, and frankly from my
    reading kosher is pretty healthy as well, Lee
    "Evelyn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hvrl97pugk5oho2bi[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 00:07:47 -0500, "Storrmmee"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>i was talking to a firend tonight and neither of us have ever seen matsa
    >>ball, sp soup in a prepared package, is there such a thing and if so what
    >>brand/where would she get it? Lee

    >
    >
    > Lee,
    >
    > All it is, is plain, good-quality chicken broth, but you have to make
    > the Matzo balls yourself. I buy Streits Matzo meal in the Jewish
    > food section of the supermarket and follow the recipe right on the
    > box. It is very simple to do, but there are some tricks.
    >
    > Basically You beat the eggs, add a little water and salt and pepper to
    > that, then put in the Matzo meal and some melted butter, blend it
    > together and then allow it to sit in the fridge for a good half hour
    > while the matzo meal soaks up the eggs. The mixture thickens up
    > while it sits.
    >
    > Then you bring your broth to a boil and with WET hands, form the
    > mixture into small balls and drop them into the simmering soup. It
    > is time consuming, since you may need to re-wet your hands from time
    > to time, and you can't cheat on the size either... they swell up as
    > they cook, so keep them small.
    >
    > Cover the pot and simmer gently till they are done.
    >
    > This recipe, with the exact amounts, is on the box. Also, I use
    > melted butter in them, which is NOT properly Kosher, if that is
    > important to you. The recipe usually calls for melted chicken fat.
    > If you have some on hand, that is perfect.
    >
    > I also do NOT cook them in the broth, but in a separate pot of boiling
    > salted water, since they tend to soak up all the broth. Then
    > afterwards I add them to the broth and serve.
    >
    > It is absolutely delicious.
    >
    > A neighbor of mine makes something similar with dumplings made of egg
    > and farina. The taste is almost exactly the same, but the matzo
    > balls are probably easier to make.
    >
    > Evelyn
    >




  12. #12
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    i think this is going on our project list next time we get together, Lee
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j7et3j$m5i$[email protected]..
    > Evelyn <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 00:07:47 -0500, "Storrmmee"
    > : <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : >i was talking to a firend tonight and neither of us have ever seen
    > matsa
    > : >ball, sp soup in a prepared package, is there such a thing and if so
    > what
    > : >brand/where would she get it? Lee
    >
    >
    > : Lee,
    >
    > : All it is, is plain, good-quality chicken broth, but you have to make
    > : the Matzo balls yourself. I buy Streits Matzo meal in the Jewish
    > : food section of the supermarket and follow the recipe right on the
    > : box. It is very simple to do, but there are some tricks.
    >
    > : Basically You beat the eggs, add a little water and salt and pepper to
    > : that, then put in the Matzo meal and some melted butter, blend it
    > : together and then allow it to sit in the fridge for a good half hour
    > : while the matzo meal soaks up the eggs. The mixture thickens up
    > : while it sits.
    >
    > : Then you bring your broth to a boil and with WET hands, form the
    > : mixture into small balls and drop them into the simmering soup. It
    > : is time consuming, since you may need to re-wet your hands from time
    > : to time, and you can't cheat on the size either... they swell up as
    > : they cook, so keep them small.
    >
    > : Cover the pot and simmer gently till they are done.
    >
    > : This recipe, with the exact amounts, is on the box. Also, I use
    > : melted butter in them, which is NOT properly Kosher, if that is
    > : important to you. The recipe usually calls for melted chicken fat.
    > : If you have some on hand, that is perfect.
    >
    > : I also do NOT cook them in the broth, but in a separate pot of boiling
    > : salted water, since they tend to soak up all the broth. Then
    > : afterwards I add them to the broth and serve.
    >
    > : It is absolutely delicious.
    >
    > : A neighbor of mine makes something similar with dumplings made of egg
    > : and farina. The taste is almost exactly the same, but the matzo
    > : balls are probably easier to make.
    >
    > : Evelyn
    >
    > I hold with what Evelyn says, except for that butter, which, IMHO woul
    > dchange the tste. You can us, eithe rmelted rendered chicken fat(the
    > original) or us a not highly flavor oil and use some chicken soup powder
    > in place of the slt in the recipe.
    >
    > I also always boil my matzo balls in a large pot, very full of water, not
    > th soup, as it uses up all yur soup:-) Keep the pot covered if you want
    > them nice and light and don't crowd the pot.
    >
    > Wendy




  13. #13
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: ping wendy and evelyn ot

    thanks, these are all good things to know, i really think this is on our
    project list, Lee
    "Janet Wilder" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4e9b05de$0$32567$c3e8da3$[email protected] eb.com...
    > There is no such thing as "matzo ball soup" It is chicken broth with matzo
    > meal dumplings.
    >
    > Never cook matzo balls in the soup.*
    >
    > I use rendered chicken fat** for my matzo balls, too. The trick is to
    > refrigerate the mixture for at least 45 minutes. Most times I make the
    > mixture a day ahead and keep it in the fridge until ready to use.
    >
    > They should be rolled into golf ball size or smaller, with wet hands and
    > put into rapidly boiling water which has a little salt in it. Be very
    > gentle with the matzo balls. Just get them round and don't handle the
    > mixture too much.
    >
    > When all the balls are in the pot, lower the heat to a slow boil, cover
    > and cook undisturbed for 45 minutes.
    >
    > While the matzo balls are cooking, heat your soup/broth to luke warm. When
    > the matzo balls are done, remove them one at a time with a slotted spoon
    > and put them into the soup. Continue to heat the soup to desired serving
    > temp.
    >
    > The colder the matzo meal mix and the length of slow boiling the matzo
    > balls are what makes for fluffy matzo balls.
    >
    > The recipe on the matzo meal box is just fine. I add white pepper and a
    > tiny pinch of freshly grated nutmeg to mine.
    >
    > Now you know the secrets of the Harlingen, TX "Matzo Ball Queen" who has
    > been feeding them to 80+ congregants every year at our communal seder. :-)
    >
    > *The fat in the matzo balls cooks out during the cooking process and that
    > will make your soup greasy. You can see it in the water.
    >
    > **To make chicken fat, save the fat from around the cavity of a whole
    > chicken or from the skin of chicken breasts. Just freeze it in a baggie.
    > It keeps forever. Keep adding more fat clumps and fatty skin to the
    > baggie and refreeze.
    >
    > When you have about half a pound, let it thaw slightly and cut it into
    > small pieces. (partially frozen fat cuts better)
    >
    > Place the pieces (skins also good) into a small, heavy sauce pan. Add a
    > tablespoon of water and heat until the pieces of skin floating on the top
    > (cracklings or gribbeness) start to turn golden and the fat is rendered
    > into liquid. Add a tablespoon of finely chopped onion and continue to cook
    > until the onion starts to brown. Remove from the heat and strain the fat
    > into a heatproof glass measuring cup. Wren cool, you can transfer it to
    > refrigerator container. It will keep in the fridge for eternity.
    > --
    > Janet Wilder
    > Way-the-heck-south Texas
    > Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.




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