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Thread: Do you eat tofu?

  1. #21
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?


    "Nana.Wilson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k23htg$52q$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:k23fta$r47$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> "Nana.Wilson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:k23for$qhm$[email protected]..
    >>>I use it in me smoothies!! YUM

    >>
    >> Now that sounds kind of weird. But whatever works for ya!

    > NAY!! You can use soy milk or yoghurt. Tofu will take on the flavour of
    > other things, so why not?


    Well I don't happen to like yogurt, any kind of milk, tofu or smoothies.



  2. #22
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 9/3/2012 8:27 PM, Nana.Wilson wrote:

    > NAY!! You can use soy milk or yoghurt. Tofu will take on the flavour of
    > other things, so why not?


    I knew a body builder who used to make silken tofu and frozen strawberry
    shakes.

    Susan

  3. #23
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    Peppermint Patootie <[email protected]> wrote:
    : ***** Begin quoted recipe

    : From _How to Cook and Eat in Chinese_ by Buwei Yang Chao.

    : (This is the edition I grew up with:
    : http://www.amazon.com/cook-Chinese-B...I6VDU/ref=sr_1
    :
    : _9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1336531462&sr=1-9 )

    : Sour-Hot Soup

    : This is also a very famous soup that sometimes will help you get rid of
    : leftovers. But sometimes we also purposely make it with fresh
    : materials. Whichever its origin, it is a most appetizing soup, if
    : properly made, and is very helpful when one is not hungry but has to
    : eat.

    : The eggs and characteristic seasoning exist in all kinds of Sour-Hot
    : soup. As to the other things you can ad lib; they can be fish, meat,
    : shrimps, bean curd, etc. Even the water itself can be replaced by
    : chicken soup, meat soup, made from boiling meat bones, etc.

    : 3 eggs
    : 7 cups water or any soup
    : 1 teaspoon salt
    : 2 Tablespoons soy sauce
    : 1/2 teaspoon taste powder (omit if you use soup instead of water)
    : 2 Tablespoons cornstarch
    : 3 Tablespoons vinegar
    : 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    : 1/2 lb of any other materials chopped in small pieces

    : Mix salt, soy sauce, taste powder, and cornstarch with 1 cup cold water
    : or soup. Then put it in 6 cups of boiling water or soup. Keep a low
    : fire while doing the following:

    : Beat 3 eggs and pour very slowly into the soup. Keep stirring the soup
    : while pouring the eggs. Then add in the vinegar and pepper and any
    : other materials. If you have meat slices, prepare them as in meat-slice
    : recipes before adding into the soup.

    : ***** End quoted recipe

    : I usually put in Chinese "long" cabbage (aka celery cabbage -- what I
    : grew up knowing as "Chinese cabbage") sliced thin, cubes of firm tofu,
    : sliced or chunked mushrooms, lily buds (from the Asian market), and
    : sliced pork that I've marinated in soy sauce. (If I consumed alcohol
    : I'd add some dry sherry to the marinade.) I use the dark, flavorful,
    : more fatty pork which is sold in the Asian market as "pork shoulder
    : butt." That dry white stuff that Anglos eat isn't really food, to my
    : taste. It's more like a construction product. ;-)

    : I prefer the flavor of tofu which I buy in Asian markets -- preferably
    : taken out of a big plastic bucket and dropped into a plastic baggie,
    : which is then tied, but that's hard to find anymore. ;-) Nowadays most
    : of it is sold in plastic tubs with lids or those square plastic boxes
    : with clear plastic top. The kind one finds in Whole Foods and the like
    : doesn't have the good sour edge to the flavor, and the texture is often
    : too grainy. I like to age mine a bit to get a little more of the good
    : flavor.

    : "Taste powder" is MSG (aji no moto). I grew up with a tin of it in the
    : cupboard. My father used it in Chinese cooking, and I never developed a
    : reaction to it until I was an adult. Nowadays it gives me migraines, so
    : I never use it.

    : For "soy sauce" I use "light soy" from the Asian market. There's a
    : brand I like which is less than $2 per liter. "Dark soy" and "mushroom
    : soy" and many other kinds of soy are different, and you don't want them
    : in this recipe.

    : I always use a meat stock, for a fuller flavor. For me, pork.

    : This is about the right spiciness for me. I don't like really spicy
    : food, but this is good. Black pepper is a different kind of hot (to my
    : tongue) than all those chillies.

    : I find sour-hot soup is wonderful in cold weather, particularly if one
    : has a cold. :-)

    : Eat it in good health!

    : Priscilla

    thanks Priscilla,

    have you ever tried it without the cornsarch? It would seem to me that
    with the eggs it might not need so much thickening. In the restaurant
    where I have had this soup there generally are no eggs, hence my thought.
    I may well be used to it rather thinner than this recipe sounds.

    Of sourse, I am eating New York Hot and Sour soup, which may well vary
    from the Chinese version, as do so many dishes, includign all those
    chicken dishes which we get with bneleses chicken, while , from what I
    gahter, teh chinese prefer bone-in hacked chicken and like to
    suck onthe bones for flavor.

    Wendy

  4. #24
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?


    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k23m4l$6k5$[email protected]..
    > Peppermint Patootie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : ***** Begin quoted recipe
    >
    > : From _How to Cook and Eat in Chinese_ by Buwei Yang Chao.
    >
    > : (This is the edition I grew up with:
    > :
    > http://www.amazon.com/cook-Chinese-B...I6VDU/ref=sr_1
    > :
    > : _9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1336531462&sr=1-9 )
    >
    > : Sour-Hot Soup
    >
    > : This is also a very famous soup that sometimes will help you get rid of
    > : leftovers. But sometimes we also purposely make it with fresh
    > : materials. Whichever its origin, it is a most appetizing soup, if
    > : properly made, and is very helpful when one is not hungry but has to
    > : eat.
    >
    > : The eggs and characteristic seasoning exist in all kinds of Sour-Hot
    > : soup. As to the other things you can ad lib; they can be fish, meat,
    > : shrimps, bean curd, etc. Even the water itself can be replaced by
    > : chicken soup, meat soup, made from boiling meat bones, etc.
    >
    > : 3 eggs
    > : 7 cups water or any soup
    > : 1 teaspoon salt
    > : 2 Tablespoons soy sauce
    > : 1/2 teaspoon taste powder (omit if you use soup instead of water)
    > : 2 Tablespoons cornstarch
    > : 3 Tablespoons vinegar
    > : 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    > : 1/2 lb of any other materials chopped in small pieces
    >
    > : Mix salt, soy sauce, taste powder, and cornstarch with 1 cup cold water
    > : or soup. Then put it in 6 cups of boiling water or soup. Keep a low
    > : fire while doing the following:
    >
    > : Beat 3 eggs and pour very slowly into the soup. Keep stirring the soup
    > : while pouring the eggs. Then add in the vinegar and pepper and any
    > : other materials. If you have meat slices, prepare them as in meat-slice
    > : recipes before adding into the soup.
    >
    > : ***** End quoted recipe
    >
    > : I usually put in Chinese "long" cabbage (aka celery cabbage -- what I
    > : grew up knowing as "Chinese cabbage") sliced thin, cubes of firm tofu,
    > : sliced or chunked mushrooms, lily buds (from the Asian market), and
    > : sliced pork that I've marinated in soy sauce. (If I consumed alcohol
    > : I'd add some dry sherry to the marinade.) I use the dark, flavorful,
    > : more fatty pork which is sold in the Asian market as "pork shoulder
    > : butt." That dry white stuff that Anglos eat isn't really food, to my
    > : taste. It's more like a construction product. ;-)
    >
    > : I prefer the flavor of tofu which I buy in Asian markets -- preferably
    > : taken out of a big plastic bucket and dropped into a plastic baggie,
    > : which is then tied, but that's hard to find anymore. ;-) Nowadays most
    > : of it is sold in plastic tubs with lids or those square plastic boxes
    > : with clear plastic top. The kind one finds in Whole Foods and the like
    > : doesn't have the good sour edge to the flavor, and the texture is often
    > : too grainy. I like to age mine a bit to get a little more of the good
    > : flavor.
    >
    > : "Taste powder" is MSG (aji no moto). I grew up with a tin of it in the
    > : cupboard. My father used it in Chinese cooking, and I never developed a
    > : reaction to it until I was an adult. Nowadays it gives me migraines, so
    > : I never use it.
    >
    > : For "soy sauce" I use "light soy" from the Asian market. There's a
    > : brand I like which is less than $2 per liter. "Dark soy" and "mushroom
    > : soy" and many other kinds of soy are different, and you don't want them
    > : in this recipe.
    >
    > : I always use a meat stock, for a fuller flavor. For me, pork.
    >
    > : This is about the right spiciness for me. I don't like really spicy
    > : food, but this is good. Black pepper is a different kind of hot (to my
    > : tongue) than all those chillies.
    >
    > : I find sour-hot soup is wonderful in cold weather, particularly if one
    > : has a cold. :-)
    >
    > : Eat it in good health!
    >
    > : Priscilla
    >
    > thanks Priscilla,
    >
    > have you ever tried it without the cornsarch? It would seem to me that
    > with the eggs it might not need so much thickening. In the restaurant
    > where I have had this soup there generally are no eggs, hence my thought.
    > I may well be used to it rather thinner than this recipe sounds.
    >
    > Of sourse, I am eating New York Hot and Sour soup, which may well vary
    > from the Chinese version, as do so many dishes, includign all those
    > chicken dishes which we get with bneleses chicken, while , from what I
    > gahter, teh chinese prefer bone-in hacked chicken and like to
    > suck onthe bones for flavor.


    When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids loved
    them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even Chinese? I
    thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.



  5. #25
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    In article <k23m4l$6k5$[email protected]>,
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Peppermint Patootie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : ***** Begin quoted recipe
    >
    > : From _How to Cook and Eat in Chinese_ by Buwei Yang Chao.
    >
    > : (This is the edition I grew up with:
    > : http://www.amazon.com/cook-Chinese-B...I6VDU/ref=sr_1
    > :
    > : _9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1336531462&sr=1-9 )
    >
    > : Sour-Hot Soup
    >
    > : This is also a very famous soup that sometimes will help you get rid of
    > : leftovers. But sometimes we also purposely make it with fresh
    > : materials. Whichever its origin, it is a most appetizing soup, if
    > : properly made, and is very helpful when one is not hungry but has to
    > : eat.
    >
    > : The eggs and characteristic seasoning exist in all kinds of Sour-Hot
    > : soup. As to the other things you can ad lib; they can be fish, meat,
    > : shrimps, bean curd, etc. Even the water itself can be replaced by
    > : chicken soup, meat soup, made from boiling meat bones, etc.
    >
    > : 3 eggs
    > : 7 cups water or any soup
    > : 1 teaspoon salt
    > : 2 Tablespoons soy sauce
    > : 1/2 teaspoon taste powder (omit if you use soup instead of water)
    > : 2 Tablespoons cornstarch
    > : 3 Tablespoons vinegar
    > : 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    > : 1/2 lb of any other materials chopped in small pieces
    >
    > : Mix salt, soy sauce, taste powder, and cornstarch with 1 cup cold water
    > : or soup. Then put it in 6 cups of boiling water or soup. Keep a low
    > : fire while doing the following:
    >
    > : Beat 3 eggs and pour very slowly into the soup. Keep stirring the soup
    > : while pouring the eggs. Then add in the vinegar and pepper and any
    > : other materials. If you have meat slices, prepare them as in meat-slice
    > : recipes before adding into the soup.
    >
    > : ***** End quoted recipe
    >
    > : I usually put in Chinese "long" cabbage (aka celery cabbage -- what I
    > : grew up knowing as "Chinese cabbage") sliced thin, cubes of firm tofu,
    > : sliced or chunked mushrooms, lily buds (from the Asian market), and
    > : sliced pork that I've marinated in soy sauce. (If I consumed alcohol
    > : I'd add some dry sherry to the marinade.) I use the dark, flavorful,
    > : more fatty pork which is sold in the Asian market as "pork shoulder
    > : butt." That dry white stuff that Anglos eat isn't really food, to my
    > : taste. It's more like a construction product. ;-)
    >
    > : I prefer the flavor of tofu which I buy in Asian markets -- preferably
    > : taken out of a big plastic bucket and dropped into a plastic baggie,
    > : which is then tied, but that's hard to find anymore. ;-) Nowadays most
    > : of it is sold in plastic tubs with lids or those square plastic boxes
    > : with clear plastic top. The kind one finds in Whole Foods and the like
    > : doesn't have the good sour edge to the flavor, and the texture is often
    > : too grainy. I like to age mine a bit to get a little more of the good
    > : flavor.
    >
    > : "Taste powder" is MSG (aji no moto). I grew up with a tin of it in the
    > : cupboard. My father used it in Chinese cooking, and I never developed a
    > : reaction to it until I was an adult. Nowadays it gives me migraines, so
    > : I never use it.
    >
    > : For "soy sauce" I use "light soy" from the Asian market. There's a
    > : brand I like which is less than $2 per liter. "Dark soy" and "mushroom
    > : soy" and many other kinds of soy are different, and you don't want them
    > : in this recipe.
    >
    > : I always use a meat stock, for a fuller flavor. For me, pork.
    >
    > : This is about the right spiciness for me. I don't like really spicy
    > : food, but this is good. Black pepper is a different kind of hot (to my
    > : tongue) than all those chillies.
    >
    > : I find sour-hot soup is wonderful in cold weather, particularly if one
    > : has a cold. :-)
    >
    > : Eat it in good health!
    >
    > : Priscilla
    >
    > thanks Priscilla,
    >
    > have you ever tried it without the cornsarch? It would seem to me that
    > with the eggs it might not need so much thickening. In the restaurant
    > where I have had this soup there generally are no eggs, hence my thought.
    > I may well be used to it rather thinner than this recipe sounds.
    >
    > Of sourse, I am eating New York Hot and Sour soup, which may well vary
    > from the Chinese version, as do so many dishes, includign all those
    > chicken dishes which we get with bneleses chicken, while , from what I
    > gahter, teh chinese prefer bone-in hacked chicken and like to
    > suck onthe bones for flavor.
    >
    > Wendy


    I'm sure I have. I usually make some variation on it these days, making
    a big soup with lots of stuff and then seasoning it with pepper and
    vinegar.

    PP

  6. #26
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    In article <k23ms6$rrv$[email protected]>,
    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids loved
    > them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even Chinese? I
    > thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.


    Japanese. Don't you see it in Japanese restaurants?

    One way to figure out if something is Japanese or Chinese is look at the
    number of syllables in the words. If there is more than one syllable,
    it's probably Japanese. If it's all words of one syllable, chances are
    it's Chinese. Korean can go either way.

    Hence:

    teriyaki = Japanese (see also words ending in -yaki, -nabe, etc.)
    shumai = Japanese

    mu shu gai pan (moo shoo guy pan) = Chinese (chicken stirfry
    w/mushrooms)
    bao bing (bow bing) = Chinese (pancakes for mu shu ro)
    won ton = Chinese

    bulgogi = Korean
    kimchee or kim chi (fermented cabbage) = Korean

    Priscilla

  7. #27
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?


    > mu shu gai pan (moo shoo guy pan) = Chinese (chicken stirfry
    > w/mushrooms)


    Correction: mu gu gai pan

  8. #28
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?


    "Peppermint Patootie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <k23ms6$rrv$[email protected]>,
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids
    >> loved
    >> them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even Chinese?
    >> I
    >> thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.

    >
    > Japanese. Don't you see it in Japanese restaurants?


    No. I don't see it because I don't go to Japanese restaurants. Or Chinese.
    >
    > One way to figure out if something is Japanese or Chinese is look at the
    > number of syllables in the words. If there is more than one syllable,
    > it's probably Japanese. If it's all words of one syllable, chances are
    > it's Chinese. Korean can go either way.


    Okay.
    >
    > Hence:
    >
    > teriyaki = Japanese (see also words ending in -yaki, -nabe, etc.)
    > shumai = Japanese
    >
    > mu shu gai pan (moo shoo guy pan) = Chinese (chicken stirfry
    > w/mushrooms)
    > bao bing (bow bing) = Chinese (pancakes for mu shu ro)
    > won ton = Chinese
    >
    > bulgogi = Korean
    > kimchee or kim chi (fermented cabbage) = Korean


    Okay.



  9. #29
    Nana.Wilson Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    Sounds tastie, Susan. Think I'll try it!!
    Nana

    "Susan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > On 9/3/2012 8:27 PM, Nana.Wilson wrote:
    >
    >> NAY!! You can use soy milk or yoghurt. Tofu will take on the flavour of
    >> other things, so why not?

    >
    > I knew a body builder who used to make silken tofu and frozen strawberry
    > shakes.
    >
    > Susan




  10. #30
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    Julie Bove <[email protected]> wrote:


    : When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids loved
    : them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even Chinese? I
    : thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.

    Teriyaki is Japanese and quite sweet so I don't make it, although it can
    be quite simple IIRC, soysaouse, sine and, honey(I believe, seasoned with
    ginger and used as a maraade adn sauce for a number of foods. No reason
    not to use it on pieces of chicken, boneless or not.

    Not terrible diabetic friendly:-(


    Wendy


  11. #31
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?


    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k257jd$l77$[email protected]..
    > Julie Bove <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > : When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids
    > loved
    > : them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even
    > Chinese? I
    > : thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.
    >
    > Teriyaki is Japanese and quite sweet so I don't make it, although it can
    > be quite simple IIRC, soysaouse, sine and, honey(I believe, seasoned with
    > ginger and used as a maraade adn sauce for a number of foods. No reason
    > not to use it on pieces of chicken, boneless or not.
    >
    > Not terrible diabetic friendly:-(


    I've never eaten it. It smells vile to me.



  12. #32
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    Peppermint Patootie <[email protected]> wrote:
    : In article <20120831042325.073$[email protected]>,
    : Nick Cramer <[email protected]> wrote:

    : > Un has used it in soups, noodle and Thai curry dishes for me. She's added
    : > fish, chicken, pork, daikon, bok choi and of course, garlic, mushroom,
    : > ginger, hot peppers, etc. It seems to absorb the flavors of what it's
    : > cooked with.

    : I grew up eating tofu, and when I was a kid it was somewhat exotic. We
    : had to buy it (out of a bucket) from the back of an Asian gift store on
    : Broadway or go down to Chinatown. We never dreamed of growing up in a
    : world in which we could buy it in most supermarkets.

    : I have a tub in my fridge right now. I use it in stirfries, sour-hot
    : soup, pork soup with cabbage, and so on.

    : PP
    : --
    : "What you fail to understand is that criticising established authority by means
    : of argument and evidence is a crucial aspect of how science works."
    : - Chris Malcolm

    I remember getting that both at Fairay and at the small Korean produce adn
    a few other things stores that were so common in my earlier married days.
    they seem to all have disappeared. I guess that first generation that
    ran these store is now retired anad the kids have all gone to college and
    have other kinds of jobs now.

    I also miss that tofu. I think it kind of hung together better.

    Wendy

  13. #33
    Alice Faber Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    In article <k257jd$l77$[email protected]>,
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Julie Bove <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > : When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids loved
    > : them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even Chinese?
    > : I
    > : thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.
    >
    > Teriyaki is Japanese and quite sweet so I don't make it, although it can
    > be quite simple IIRC, soysaouse, sine and, honey(I believe, seasoned with
    > ginger and used as a maraade adn sauce for a number of foods. No reason
    > not to use it on pieces of chicken, boneless or not.
    >
    > Not terrible diabetic friendly:-(
    >


    I make a marinade with tamari, ginger, garlic, and splenda.
    It's not quite teriyaki, but close enough, and is marvellous with
    swordfish.

    --
    "Isn't embarrassing to quote something you didn't read and then attack
    what it didn't say?"--WG, where else but Usenet

  14. #34
    KROM Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    that’s my go to Asian style sauce..then I branch it out from there..

    adding toasted sesame oil and red pepper flakes....fish sauce and weirdly
    enough mustard and mayo to the main part makes a wonderful salad dressing.


    oh and I like to add organic ketchup to the main sauce for a yummy general
    tso type sauce


    KROM


    "Alice Faber" wrote ...


    I make a marinade with tamari, ginger, garlic, and splenda.
    It's not quite teriyaki, but close enough, and is marvellous with
    swordfish.


  15. #35
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    Alice Faber <[email protected]> wrote:
    : In article <k257jd$l77$[email protected]>,
    : "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    : > Julie Bove <[email protected]> wrote:
    : >
    : >
    : > : When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids loved
    : > : them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even Chinese?
    : > : I
    : > : thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.
    : >
    : > Teriyaki is Japanese and quite sweet so I don't make it, although it can
    : > be quite simple IIRC, soysaouse, sine and, honey(I believe, seasoned with
    : > ginger and used as a maraade adn sauce for a number of foods. No reason
    : > not to use it on pieces of chicken, boneless or not.
    : >
    : > Not terrible diabetic friendly:-(
    : >

    : I make a marinade with tamari, ginger, garlic, and splenda.
    : It's not quite teriyaki, but close enough, and is marvellous with
    : swordfish.

    : --
    : "Isn't embarrassing to quote something you didn't read and then attack
    : what it didn't say?"--WG, where else but Usenet

    Thanks! I think I will try that , even on chicken on the grill. I might
    add a little wine(dry) to that.

    Wendy

  16. #36
    Peppermint Patootie Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    In article <k257st$l77$[email protected]>,
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > : I grew up eating tofu, and when I was a kid it was somewhat exotic. We
    > : had to buy it (out of a bucket) from the back of an Asian gift store on
    > : Broadway or go down to Chinatown. We never dreamed of growing up in a
    > : world in which we could buy it in most supermarkets.
    >
    > : I have a tub in my fridge right now. I use it in stirfries, sour-hot
    > : soup, pork soup with cabbage, and so on.
    >
    > I remember getting that both at Fairay and at the small Korean produce adn
    > a few other things stores that were so common in my earlier married days.
    > they seem to all have disappeared. I guess that first generation that
    > ran these store is now retired anad the kids have all gone to college and
    > have other kinds of jobs now.
    >
    > I also miss that tofu. I think it kind of hung together better.


    The tofu I get at Asian markets is that kind. I much prefer it to the
    "crunchy granola" tofu that's sold at places like the food co-op and
    Whole Foods. Nowadays the tofu in the Asian markets in those plastic
    tubs -- rectangular tubs with sheet plastic across the top for one or
    two bricks and quart or larger buckets with lids for 4-6 bricks. It can
    have writing in pretty much any Asian language on it. I think I've
    eaten Vietnamese, Cambodian, or Thai tofu that's indistinguishable from
    what I grew up eating.

    BTW, I'm coming down to NYC over Columbus Day weekend so my niece can
    look over Columbia and NYU. I don't think we're going to have a spare
    moment (and I don't know yet where we're staying), but I wish I could
    stop by the West 90s and say "hi!" I don't think she's going to end up
    in NYC (I'm trying to get her to think about Swarthmore and Brown*), but
    if she does, we'll have to get together for a cup of tea or something
    some time when I'm down visiting her!

    Priscilla

    * She was babbling on about California (Pomona, Stamford, etc.), and I
    panicked, thinking, "Who's going to pay for her plane tickets?" which is
    what got me putting ideas about NYC, Philadelphia, and Providence in her
    head. Harvard is out because it's too much where she grew up. OK,
    she'll move away for college, but not across the country!
    --
    "What you fail to understand is that criticising established authority by means
    of argument and evidence is a crucial aspect of how science works."
    - Chris Malcolm

  17. #37
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    Peppermint Patootie <[email protected]> wrote:
    : In article <k257st$l77$[email protected]>,
    : "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    : > : I grew up eating tofu, and when I was a kid it was somewhat exotic. We
    : > : had to buy it (out of a bucket) from the back of an Asian gift store on
    : > : Broadway or go down to Chinatown. We never dreamed of growing up in a
    : > : world in which we could buy it in most supermarkets.
    : >
    : > : I have a tub in my fridge right now. I use it in stirfries, sour-hot
    : > : soup, pork soup with cabbage, and so on.
    : >
    : > I remember getting that both at Fairay and at the small Korean produce adn
    : > a few other things stores that were so common in my earlier married days.
    : > they seem to all have disappeared. I guess that first generation that
    : > ran these store is now retired anad the kids have all gone to college and
    : > have other kinds of jobs now.
    : >
    : > I also miss that tofu. I think it kind of hung together better.

    : The tofu I get at Asian markets is that kind. I much prefer it to the
    : "crunchy granola" tofu that's sold at places like the food co-op and
    : Whole Foods. Nowadays the tofu in the Asian markets in those plastic
    : tubs -- rectangular tubs with sheet plastic across the top for one or
    : two bricks and quart or larger buckets with lids for 4-6 bricks. It can
    : have writing in pretty much any Asian language on it. I think I've
    : eaten Vietnamese, Cambodian, or Thai tofu that's indistinguishable from
    : what I grew up eating.

    : BTW, I'm coming down to NYC over Columbus Day weekend so my niece can
    : look over Columbia and NYU. I don't think we're going to have a spare
    : moment (and I don't know yet where we're staying), but I wish I could
    : stop by the West 90s and say "hi!" I don't think she's going to end up
    : in NYC (I'm trying to get her to think about Swarthmore and Brown*), but
    : if she does, we'll have to get together for a cup of tea or something
    : some time when I'm down visiting her!

    : Priscilla

    : * She was babbling on about California (Pomona, Stamford, etc.), and I
    : panicked, thinking, "Who's going to pay for her plane tickets?" which is
    : what got me putting ideas about NYC, Philadelphia, and Providence in her
    : head. Harvard is out because it's too much where she grew up. OK,
    : she'll move away for college, but not across the country!
    : --
    : "What you fail to understand is that criticising established authority by means
    : of argument and evidence is a crucial aspect of how science works."
    : - Chris Malcolm

    Reminds meof the old jewsih story about how a child can never move more
    than lamb chop defrosting distance. It can be by foot, bus, car, train or
    plain, but never , by whaatever means longer to get there than the time
    it takes a lamb chop to defrost in the mother's purse. I guess it's aunt
    in your case:-)

    Wendy



  18. #38
    news Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?


    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k1p3ml$dgi$[email protected]..
    >I tried making some tonight because I was told it was a good thing to eat
    >for protein when you have gout. It didn't go over some well. Granted I
    >didn't have some of the ingredients that the recipe called for. Namely
    >Tamari and fresh ginger. The only other ingredient was a lot of fresh
    >garlic which I did have. I used the regular soy sauce that I did have and
    >a little powdered ginger. I also added some green onions because some of
    >the reviewers for the recipe said that it didn't have a lot of flavor.
    >You're supposed to cut it (extra firm tofu) in cubes, marinate it in the
    >other ingredients then fry it for 20 minutes in a little oil.


    Try freezing it, draining it, pressing it, then dry-frying the tofu before
    using it in a recipe. It does wonders for the texture. and it soaks up a lot
    more flavor.



  19. #39
    Colt T Guest

    Default Re: Do you eat tofu?

    dans un endroit que vous ne rêvent que de l'endroit où votre
    âme est toujours libre, le stade d'argent et de rideaux dorés
    remplis ma plaine tête peut être


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