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Thread: THE CREEPY SIDE OF FOOD COLORING

  1. #1
    Robert of St Louis Guest

    Default THE CREEPY SIDE OF FOOD COLORING


    The creepy side of food coloring
    By Georgina Gustin
    ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    06/01/2009

    The pink in your lemonade. The red in your bonbons. The strawberry-
    colored hue in your ice cream or yogurt.

    That color, in many cases, comes from the dried body of little critter
    called a cochineal bug and its presence in your food is obscured
    under the terms "artificial colors" or "color added."

    But earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration imposed a rule
    saying that any food or cosmetic containing cochineal, or a related
    additive called carmine, be labeled as such.

    The change comes after a decade-long campaign by the Center for
    Science in the Public Interest, a Washington-based watchdog group that
    pushed the FDA to require the labeling.

    The group's efforts were spurred by a University of Michigan allergist
    who found that a patient suffered severe allergic reactions after
    ingesting the additives. After petitioning the FDA in 1998, the group
    received several dozen reports from consumers saying they'd also
    experienced adverse reactions from ingesting the extracts.

    The watchdog group says it celebrates the decision but believes the
    FDA should have banned the ingredients altogether.
    RELATED LINKS
    Keep up on technical news with our Life & Tech blog
    Get more science and tech news

    And, it points out, the new labeling rule doesn't require companies to
    explicitly say their products contain additives from insects,
    information that might be valuable to people with dietary restrictions
    such as vegetarians, Jews and Muslims.

    The rule takes effect in January 2011.


  2. #2
    Alan S Guest

    Default Re: THE CREEPY SIDE OF FOOD COLORING

    On Mon, 1 Jun 2009 07:32:50 -0700 (PDT), Robert of St Louis
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >The creepy side of food coloring
    >By Georgina Gustin
    >ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    >06/01/2009
    >
    >The pink in your lemonade. The red in your bonbons. The strawberry-
    >colored hue in your ice cream or yogurt.
    >
    >That color, in many cases, comes from the dried body of little critter
    >called a cochineal bug — and its presence in your food is obscured
    >under the terms "artificial colors" or "color added."
    >
    >But earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration imposed a rule
    >saying that any food or cosmetic containing cochineal, or a related
    >additive called carmine, be labeled as such.
    >
    >The change comes after a decade-long campaign by the Center for
    >Science in the Public Interest, a Washington-based watchdog group that
    >pushed the FDA to require the labeling.
    >
    >The group's efforts were spurred by a University of Michigan allergist
    >who found that a patient suffered severe allergic reactions after
    >ingesting the additives. After petitioning the FDA in 1998, the group
    >received several dozen reports from consumers saying they'd also
    >experienced adverse reactions from ingesting the extracts.
    >
    >The watchdog group says it celebrates the decision but believes the
    >FDA should have banned the ingredients altogether.
    >RELATED LINKS
    > Keep up on technical news with our Life & Tech blog
    > Get more science and tech news
    >
    >And, it points out, the new labeling rule doesn't require companies to
    >explicitly say their products contain additives from insects,
    >information that might be valuable to people with dietary restrictions
    >such as vegetarians, Jews and Muslims.
    >
    >The rule takes effect in January 2011.


    Cochineal has been used as a food colouring for centuries. I
    can remember my grand-mother telling me about it when I was
    tiny and that was a loooong time ago.

    A quick search on Google scholar found little evidence of
    harmful effects.

    I think I prefer the idea of cochineal to some of the other
    chemicals used in our processed foods.

    Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
    --
    d&e, metformin 2000 mg
    Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
    http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com (Breakfast On The Run)
    http://loraltravel.blogspot.com (Jerash, an Ancient City in Jordan)

  3. #3
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: THE CREEPY SIDE OF FOOD COLORING

    Alan S <[email protected]> wrote:
    : On Mon, 1 Jun 2009 07:32:50 -0700 (PDT), Robert of St Louis
    : <[email protected]> wrote:

    : >
    : >The creepy side of food coloring
    : >By Georgina Gustin
    : >ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    : >06/01/2009
    : >
    : >The pink in your lemonade. The red in your bonbons. The strawberry-
    : >colored hue in your ice cream or yogurt.
    : >
    : >That color, in many cases, comes from the dried body of little critter
    : >called a cochineal bug ? and its presence in your food is obscured
    : >under the terms "artificial colors" or "color added."
    : >
    : >But earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration imposed a rule
    : >saying that any food or cosmetic containing cochineal, or a related
    : >additive called carmine, be labeled as such.
    : >
    : >The change comes after a decade-long campaign by the Center for
    : >Science in the Public Interest, a Washington-based watchdog group that
    : >pushed the FDA to require the labeling.
    : >
    : >The group's efforts were spurred by a University of Michigan allergist
    : >who found that a patient suffered severe allergic reactions after
    : >ingesting the additives. After petitioning the FDA in 1998, the group
    : >received several dozen reports from consumers saying they'd also
    : >experienced adverse reactions from ingesting the extracts.
    : >
    : >The watchdog group says it celebrates the decision but believes the
    : >FDA should have banned the ingredients altogether.
    : >RELATED LINKS
    : > Keep up on technical news with our Life & Tech blog
    : > Get more science and tech news
    : >
    : >And, it points out, the new labeling rule doesn't require companies to
    : >explicitly say their products contain additives from insects,
    : >information that might be valuable to people with dietary restrictions
    : >such as vegetarians, Jews and Muslims.
    : >
    : >The rule takes effect in January 2011.

    : Cochineal has been used as a food colouring for centuries. I
    : can remember my grand-mother telling me about it when I was
    : tiny and that was a loooong time ago.

    : A quick search on Google scholar found little evidence of
    : harmful effects.

    : I think I prefer the idea of cochineal to some of the other
    : chemicals used in our processed foods.

    : Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.

    I understand that you can make shrimp butter by poundign the shells of
    cooked shrimp to add to the butter for flavor. Obviously, I don't do this
    as shrimp, along with other shell fish is not kosher.

    Wendy

  4. #4
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: THE CREEPY SIDE OF FOOD COLORING


    "Alan S" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 1 Jun 2009 07:32:50 -0700 (PDT), Robert of St Louis
    > <free.tuneup@gmai[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>The creepy side of food coloring
    >>By Georgina Gustin
    >>ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    >>06/01/2009
    >>
    >>The pink in your lemonade. The red in your bonbons. The strawberry-
    >>colored hue in your ice cream or yogurt.
    >>
    >>That color, in many cases, comes from the dried body of little critter
    >>called a cochineal bug - and its presence in your food is obscured
    >>under the terms "artificial colors" or "color added."
    >>
    >>But earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration imposed a rule
    >>saying that any food or cosmetic containing cochineal, or a related
    >>additive called carmine, be labeled as such.
    >>
    >>The change comes after a decade-long campaign by the Center for
    >>Science in the Public Interest, a Washington-based watchdog group that
    >>pushed the FDA to require the labeling.
    >>
    >>The group's efforts were spurred by a University of Michigan allergist
    >>who found that a patient suffered severe allergic reactions after
    >>ingesting the additives. After petitioning the FDA in 1998, the group
    >>received several dozen reports from consumers saying they'd also
    >>experienced adverse reactions from ingesting the extracts.
    >>
    >>The watchdog group says it celebrates the decision but believes the
    >>FDA should have banned the ingredients altogether.
    >>RELATED LINKS
    >> Keep up on technical news with our Life & Tech blog
    >> Get more science and tech news
    >>
    >>And, it points out, the new labeling rule doesn't require companies to
    >>explicitly say their products contain additives from insects,
    >>information that might be valuable to people with dietary restrictions
    >>such as vegetarians, Jews and Muslims.
    >>
    >>The rule takes effect in January 2011.

    >
    > Cochineal has been used as a food colouring for centuries. I
    > can remember my grand-mother telling me about it when I was
    > tiny and that was a loooong time ago.
    >
    > A quick search on Google scholar found little evidence of
    > harmful effects.
    >
    > I think I prefer the idea of cochineal to some of the other
    > chemicals used in our processed foods.


    Two problems that I've heard of. One is that vegans won't eat it. Oddly I
    have recently heard of vegans who did not know what it was and were
    horrified that they might have eaten something that contained it.

    The other problem is that some people might be allergic to it. This would
    be the bigger problem, I think.

    I just find it very hard to believe that this is new news to anyone. I have
    known this since I was a child. Of course I did study food and additives
    when I was a child.



  5. #5
    Robert of St Louis Guest

    Default Re: THE CREEPY SIDE OF FOOD COLORING

    On Jun 1, 5:04*pm, Alan S <loralgtweightandca...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Mon, 1 Jun 2009 07:32:50 -0700 (PDT), Robert of St Louis
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >The creepy side of food coloring
    > >By Georgina Gustin
    > >ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    > >06/01/2009

    >
    > >The pink in your lemonade. The red in your bonbons. The strawberry-
    > >colored hue in your ice cream or yogurt.

    >
    > >That color, in many cases, comes from the dried body of little critter
    > >called a cochineal bug and its presence in your food is obscured
    > >under the terms "artificial colors" or "color added."

    >
    > >But earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration imposed a rule
    > >saying that any food or cosmetic containing cochineal, or a related
    > >additive called carmine, be labeled as such.

    >
    > >The change comes after a decade-long campaign by the Center for
    > >Science in the Public Interest, a Washington-based watchdog group that
    > >pushed the FDA to require the labeling.

    >
    > >The group's efforts were spurred by a University of Michigan allergist
    > >who found that a patient suffered severe allergic reactions after
    > >ingesting the additives. After petitioning the FDA in 1998, the group
    > >received several dozen reports from consumers saying they'd also
    > >experienced adverse reactions from ingesting the extracts.

    >
    > >The watchdog group says it celebrates the decision but believes the
    > >FDA should have banned the ingredients altogether.
    > >RELATED LINKS
    > > Keep up on technical news with our Life & Tech blog
    > > Get more science and tech news

    >
    > >And, it points out, the new labeling rule doesn't require companies to
    > >explicitly say their products contain additives from insects,
    > >information that might be valuable to people with dietary restrictions
    > >such as vegetarians, Jews and Muslims.

    >
    > >The rule takes effect in January 2011.

    >
    > Cochineal has been used as a food colouring for centuries. I
    > can remember my grand-mother telling me about it when I was
    > tiny and that was a loooong time ago.
    >
    > A quick search on Google scholar found little evidence of
    > harmful effects.
    >
    > I think I prefer the idea of cochineal to some of the other
    > chemicals used in our processed foods.
    >
    > Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
    > --
    > d&e, metformin 2000 mg
    > Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com(Breakfast On The Run)http://loraltravel.blogspot.com(Jerash, an AncientCity in Jordan)- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I think it is one of those things you would rather not be reminded
    of...like how sausages are made, baloney,etc.

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