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Thread: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

  1. #1
    Cheri Guest

    Default From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    "CostCo doesn't always have fresh halibut, but when it does, there are
    worms in the flesh (meat, no skin). Most of them were dead, but after
    careful poking and prodding a few packages, I did find one that was
    still kicking and squirming.

    I first noticed this in 1999 at the Santa Cruz CostCo. And again a
    couple days ago at the Austin location.

    What kind of parasites would these be (about .66cm and white)? Dead
    ones have a darker, transparent hull and are flat, but live ones look
    like very thin moving rice, less than 1mm wide fully extended).

    Needless to say, do not use the halibut at CostCo (or any halibut for
    that matter) for sashimi."




  2. #2
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 4/19/2011 2:31 PM, Cheri wrote:
    > "CostCo doesn't always have fresh halibut, but when it does, there are
    > worms in the flesh (meat, no skin). Most of them were dead, but after
    > careful poking and prodding a few packages, I did find one that was
    > still kicking and squirming.
    >
    > I first noticed this in 1999 at the Santa Cruz CostCo. And again a
    > couple days ago at the Austin location.
    >
    > What kind of parasites would these be (about .66cm and white)? Dead
    > ones have a darker, transparent hull and are flat, but live ones look
    > like very thin moving rice, less than 1mm wide fully extended).
    >
    > Needless to say, do not use the halibut at CostCo (or any halibut for
    > that matter) for sashimi."
    >
    >
    >


    It's not just Costco and it's not just halibut; bottom feeders, cod,
    lots of fish have worms. Holding them up to bright light lets you see
    them and pick them out.

    Susan

  3. #3
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    Cheri <[email protected]> wrote:
    : "CostCo doesn't always have fresh halibut, but when it does, there are
    : worms in the flesh (meat, no skin). Most of them were dead, but after
    : careful poking and prodding a few packages, I did find one that was
    : still kicking and squirming.

    : I first noticed this in 1999 at the Santa Cruz CostCo. And again a
    : couple days ago at the Austin location.

    : What kind of parasites would these be (about .66cm and white)? Dead
    : ones have a darker, transparent hull and are flat, but live ones look
    : like very thin moving rice, less than 1mm wide fully extended).

    : Needless to say, do not use the halibut at CostCo (or any halibut for
    : that matter) for sashimi."
    lately there has been much discussion aobut worms in fish, dead or alice.
    they are found, for expmple, in sardines in cans that stil have the spine
    and skin , while the process of skinning and boning seems to clear out the
    worms. Other fish( I don't remember all of them) seem to have this
    problem. apparantly, it has been going on all the time, but ust ,
    somehow, not noticed. I don't think it is specific to Costso.

    Wendy



  4. #4
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    On Tue, 19 Apr 2011 20:45:39 +0000 (UTC), "W. Baker"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Cheri <[email protected]> wrote:
    >: "CostCo doesn't always have fresh halibut, but when it does, there are
    >: worms in the flesh (meat, no skin). Most of them were dead, but after
    >: careful poking and prodding a few packages, I did find one that was
    >: still kicking and squirming.
    >
    >: I first noticed this in 1999 at the Santa Cruz CostCo. And again a
    >: couple days ago at the Austin location.
    >
    >: What kind of parasites would these be (about .66cm and white)? Dead
    >: ones have a darker, transparent hull and are flat, but live ones look
    >: like very thin moving rice, less than 1mm wide fully extended).
    >
    >: Needless to say, do not use the halibut at CostCo (or any halibut for
    >: that matter) for sashimi."
    >lately there has been much discussion aobut worms in fish, dead or alice.
    >they are found, for expmple, in sardines in cans that stil have the spine
    >and skin , while the process of skinning and boning seems to clear out the
    >worms. Other fish( I don't remember all of them) seem to have this
    >problem. apparantly, it has been going on all the time, but ust ,
    >somehow, not noticed. I don't think it is specific to Costso.
    >
    >Wendy



    I have seen those worms in cod. Dead at the time, but unmistakeable
    what they were. UGH! I do love fish and Halibut is my favorite,
    but worms are truly disgusting.

  5. #5
    atec77 Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    On 20/04/2011 7:41 AM, Evelyn wrote:
    > On Tue, 19 Apr 2011 20:45:39 +0000 (UTC), "W. Baker"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Cheri<[email protected]> wrote:
    >> : "CostCo doesn't always have fresh halibut, but when it does, there are
    >> : worms in the flesh (meat, no skin). Most of them were dead, but after
    >> : careful poking and prodding a few packages, I did find one that was
    >> : still kicking and squirming.
    >>
    >> : I first noticed this in 1999 at the Santa Cruz CostCo. And again a
    >> : couple days ago at the Austin location.
    >>
    >> : What kind of parasites would these be (about .66cm and white)? Dead
    >> : ones have a darker, transparent hull and are flat, but live ones look
    >> : like very thin moving rice, less than 1mm wide fully extended).
    >>
    >> : Needless to say, do not use the halibut at CostCo (or any halibut for
    >> : that matter) for sashimi."
    >> lately there has been much discussion aobut worms in fish, dead or alice.
    >> they are found, for expmple, in sardines in cans that stil have the spine
    >> and skin , while the process of skinning and boning seems to clear out the
    >> worms. Other fish( I don't remember all of them) seem to have this
    >> problem. apparantly, it has been going on all the time, but ust ,
    >> somehow, not noticed. I don't think it is specific to Costso.
    >>
    >> Wendy

    >
    >
    > I have seen those worms in cod. Dead at the time, but unmistakeable
    > what they were. UGH! I do love fish and Halibut is my favorite,
    > but worms are truly disgusting.

    Protein though and once cooked is safe

    --
    X-No-Archive: Yes


  6. #6
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    x-no-archive: yes

    \
    On 4/19/2011 5:41 PM, Evelyn wrote:

    > I have seen those worms in cod. Dead at the time, but unmistakeable
    > what they were. UGH! I do love fish and Halibut is my favorite,
    > but worms are truly disgusting.


    At least you can see most worms, though I've read that candling won't
    show those in dark flesh or very deep. The most common parasites are
    nematodes and other larva, and those are very common. I read a study on
    freezing, and even at 20 below zero, it took weeks, I think, to kill off
    all the nematodes so they weren't revived upon thawing. BLEAH.

    Susan

  7. #7
    atec77 Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    On 20/04/2011 7:50 AM, Susan wrote:
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > \
    > On 4/19/2011 5:41 PM, Evelyn wrote:
    >
    >> I have seen those worms in cod. Dead at the time, but unmistakeable
    >> what they were. UGH! I do love fish and Halibut is my favorite,
    >> but worms are truly disgusting.

    >
    > At least you can see most worms, though I've read that candling won't
    > show those in dark flesh or very deep. The most common parasites are
    > nematodes and other larva, and those are very common. I read a study on
    > freezing, and even at 20 below zero, it took weeks, I think, to kill off
    > all the nematodes so they weren't revived upon thawing. BLEAH.
    >
    > Susan

    Fish makes good bait I guess

    --
    X-No-Archive: Yes


  8. #8
    Malcom \Mal\ Reynolds Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    In article <[email protected]>, "Cheri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > "CostCo doesn't always have fresh halibut, but when it does, there are
    > worms in the flesh (meat, no skin). Most of them were dead, but after
    > careful poking and prodding a few packages, I did find one that was
    > still kicking and squirming.
    >
    > I first noticed this in 1999 at the Santa Cruz CostCo. And again a
    > couple days ago at the Austin location.
    >
    > What kind of parasites would these be (about .66cm and white)? Dead
    > ones have a darker, transparent hull and are flat, but live ones look
    > like very thin moving rice, less than 1mm wide fully extended).
    >
    > Needless to say, do not use the halibut at CostCo (or any halibut for
    > that matter) for sashimi."


    While I can see that flesh would be appealing and serve as a source of nutrition
    to the parasites, haven't they involved in an aqueous environment? don't they
    need all that water (and blood) to sustain them?

  9. #9
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    "Susan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > On 4/19/2011 2:31 PM, Cheri wrote:
    >> "CostCo doesn't always have fresh halibut, but when it does, there are
    >> worms in the flesh (meat, no skin). Most of them were dead, but after
    >> careful poking and prodding a few packages, I did find one that was
    >> still kicking and squirming.
    >>
    >> I first noticed this in 1999 at the Santa Cruz CostCo. And again a
    >> couple days ago at the Austin location.
    >>
    >> What kind of parasites would these be (about .66cm and white)? Dead
    >> ones have a darker, transparent hull and are flat, but live ones look
    >> like very thin moving rice, less than 1mm wide fully extended).
    >>
    >> Needless to say, do not use the halibut at CostCo (or any halibut for
    >> that matter) for sashimi."
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > It's not just Costco and it's not just halibut; bottom feeders, cod, lots
    > of fish have worms. Holding them up to bright light lets you see them and
    > pick them out.
    >
    > Susan


    I know. :-)

    Cheri



  10. #10
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    Susan wrote:
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > \
    > On 4/19/2011 5:41 PM, Evelyn wrote:
    >
    >> I have seen those worms in cod. Dead at the time, but unmistakeable
    >> what they were. UGH! I do love fish and Halibut is my favorite,
    >> but worms are truly disgusting.

    >
    > At least you can see most worms, though I've read that candling won't
    > show those in dark flesh or very deep. The most common parasites are
    > nematodes and other larva, and those are very common. I read a study
    > on freezing, and even at 20 below zero, it took weeks, I think, to
    > kill off all the nematodes so they weren't revived upon thawing. BLEAH.
    > Susan


    The moral of the story is DO NOT EAT RAW FISH! <G>



  11. #11
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 4/20/2011 1:00 PM, Janet wrote:

    > The moral of the story is DO NOT EAT RAW FISH!<G>
    >
    >


    What about all the sushi and sashimi I used to eat??

    Cooking to 140 internal temp suppposedly kills all the buggers.

    Susan

  12. #12
    =?iso-8859-1?b?Qmr4cm4=?= Steensrud Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    On Tue, 19 Apr 2011 17:50:25 -0400, Susan wrote:

    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > \
    > On 4/19/2011 5:41 PM, Evelyn wrote:
    >
    >> I have seen those worms in cod. Dead at the time, but unmistakeable
    >> what they were. UGH! I do love fish and Halibut is my favorite,
    >> but worms are truly disgusting.

    >


    > At least you can see most worms, though I've read that candling won't
    > show those in dark flesh or very deep. The most common parasites are
    > nematodes and other larva, and those are very common. I read a study on
    > freezing, and even at 20 below zero, it took weeks, I think, to kill off
    > all the nematodes so they weren't revived upon thawing. BLEAH.
    >
    > Susan


    Could it be anisakis? I found this, using the Norwegian name for it,
    "kveis":

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anisakis

    "Kveis" usually lives in the intestines of the fish, so if the fish is
    quickly cleaned when caught there is very litte risk of worms in the
    flesh.
    However - sometimes the killed fish is simply put on ice, which does not
    kill the worms. We do eat raw fish, but it is ALWAYS frozen first. After
    thawing, any worms are just so much protein and no more alive than the
    fish :-)

  13. #13
    =?iso-8859-1?b?Qmr4cm4=?= Steensrud Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    On Tue, 19 Apr 2011 15:07:05 -0700, Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, "Cheri"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "CostCo doesn't always have fresh halibut, but when it does, there are
    >> worms in the flesh (meat, no skin). Most of them were dead, but after
    >> careful poking and prodding a few packages, I did find one that was
    >> still kicking and squirming.
    >>
    >> I first noticed this in 1999 at the Santa Cruz CostCo. And again a
    >> couple days ago at the Austin location.
    >>
    >> What kind of parasites would these be (about .66cm and white)? Dead
    >> ones have a darker, transparent hull and are flat, but live ones look
    >> like very thin moving rice, less than 1mm wide fully extended).
    >>
    >> Needless to say, do not use the halibut at CostCo (or any halibut for
    >> that matter) for sashimi."

    >
    > While I can see that flesh would be appealing and serve as a source of
    > nutrition to the parasites, haven't they involved in an aqueous
    > environment? don't they need all that water (and blood) to sustain them?


    See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anisakis

  14. #14
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    Susan wrote:
    <snip>

    > What about all the sushi and sashimi I used to eat??


    To eat his own. Not me. But then I did have the job in the fish factory,
    plucking the worms out...

    > Cooking to 140 internal temp suppposedly kills all the buggers.
    >
    > Susan


    Yeah, although I don't want to see them, I feel perfectly safe eating cooked
    fish. But for years after I worked in the factory, I would discreetly flake
    any cod or similar fish that was served to me.



  15. #15
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 4/20/2011 2:31 PM, Bjørn Steensrud wrote:

    > Could it be anisakis? I found this, using the Norwegian name for it,
    > "kveis":
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anisakis


    They say that's the commonest one.
    Susan

  16. #16
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 4/20/2011 3:44 PM, Janet wrote:

    > Yeah, although I don't want to see them, I feel perfectly safe eating cooked
    > fish. But for years after I worked in the factory, I would discreetly flake
    > any cod or similar fish that was served to me.
    >
    >


    You can bet I do, too, from now on.

    Susan

  17. #17
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: From Another Newsgroup, Costco halibut

    i took my food sanitation certification for the state of IL and chicago
    proper in 1990 at that time they showed a movie of how to candle the fish,
    and in that same movie a clip of fish cooking and the worms leaving the
    fish... one of those things its just fine i couldn't see, caused a few in
    the class to become ill in class watching...

    Lee
    "W. Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ioks9j$ao3$[email protected]..
    > Cheri <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : "CostCo doesn't always have fresh halibut, but when it does, there are
    > : worms in the flesh (meat, no skin). Most of them were dead, but after
    > : careful poking and prodding a few packages, I did find one that was
    > : still kicking and squirming.
    >
    > : I first noticed this in 1999 at the Santa Cruz CostCo. And again a
    > : couple days ago at the Austin location.
    >
    > : What kind of parasites would these be (about .66cm and white)? Dead
    > : ones have a darker, transparent hull and are flat, but live ones look
    > : like very thin moving rice, less than 1mm wide fully extended).
    >
    > : Needless to say, do not use the halibut at CostCo (or any halibut for
    > : that matter) for sashimi."
    > lately there has been much discussion aobut worms in fish, dead or alice.
    > they are found, for expmple, in sardines in cans that stil have the spine
    > and skin , while the process of skinning and boning seems to clear out the
    > worms. Other fish( I don't remember all of them) seem to have this
    > problem. apparantly, it has been going on all the time, but ust ,
    > somehow, not noticed. I don't think it is specific to Costso.
    >
    > Wendy
    >
    >




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