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Thread: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

  1. #1
    Robert of St Louis Guest

    Default Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    and califlower.

    Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.

    A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.


  2. #2
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    "Robert of St Louis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    > mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    > and califlower.
    >
    > Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    > popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    > and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.
    >
    > A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.



    I love them! If you mash them with a little splenda and butter they are
    delicious.


    --

    Evelyn

    The fool thinks he has won a battle when he bullies with harsh speech, but
    knowing how to be forbearing alone makes one victorious.
    Samyutta Nikaya I, 163


  3. #3
    Robert of St Louis Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    On May 29, 9:49*am, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > "Robert of St Louis" <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]...
    >
    > > The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    > > mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    > > and califlower.

    >
    > > Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    > > popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    > > and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.

    >
    > > A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.

    >
    > I love them! * If you mash them with a little splenda and butter they are
    > delicious.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Evelyn
    >
    > The fool thinks he has won a battle when he bullies with harsh speech, but
    > knowing how to be forbearing alone makes one victorious.
    > Samyutta Nikaya I, 163


    In other words...they are very very healthy?

  4. #4
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    "Robert of St Louis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On May 29, 9:49 am, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > "Robert of St Louis" <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote in
    > messagenews:[email protected]...
    >
    > > The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    > > mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    > > and califlower.

    >
    > > Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    > > popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    > > and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.

    >
    > > A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.

    >
    > I love them! If you mash them with a little splenda and butter they are
    > delicious.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Evelyn


    In other words...they are very very healthy?

    We eat them not because they are healthy, but because we like them. They
    are also good if you cut them into chunks, sprinkle with salt, pepper and
    garlic and oil, and bake them in a hot oven.

    My mother always would include a potato in the batch when she boiled them,
    because they would mash a little nicer.

    I almost always boil, then mash them with butter, milk, salt and pepper.

    --

    Evelyn

    The fool thinks he has won a battle when he bullies with harsh speech, but
    knowing how to be forbearing alone makes one victorious.
    Samyutta Nikaya I, 163


  5. #5
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?


    "Robert of St Louis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    > mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    > and califlower.
    >
    > Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    > popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    > and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.
    >
    > A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.


    I thought Swedes were eggplant?



  6. #6
    Robert of St Louis Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    On May 29, 10:23*am, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > "Robert of St Louis" <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]...
    > On May 29, 9:49 am, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Robert of St Louis" <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote in
    > > messagenews:[email protected]...

    >
    > > > The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    > > > mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    > > > and califlower.

    >
    > > > Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    > > > popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    > > > and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.

    >
    > > > A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.

    >
    > > I love them! If you mash them with a little splenda and butter they are
    > > delicious.

    >
    > > --

    >
    > > Evelyn

    >
    > In other words...they are very very healthy?
    >
    > We eat them not because they are healthy, but because we like them. * They
    > are also good if you cut them into chunks, sprinkle with salt, pepper and
    > garlic and oil, and bake them in a hot oven.
    >
    > My mother always would include a potato in the batch when she boiled them,
    > because they would mash a little nicer.
    >
    > I almost always boil, then mash them with butter, milk, salt and pepper.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Evelyn
    >
    > The fool thinks he has won a battle when he bullies with harsh speech, but
    > knowing how to be forbearing alone makes one victorious.
    > Samyutta Nikaya I, 163- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I am sort of doing that right now. I chopped a half of one up...(they
    are huge) chopped it up into small pieces like and apple. I seasoned
    it, threw in some bell peppers, a little bit of tomato, then I put it
    in the bottom of my crock pot. On top of that I placed one chicken
    breast...hoping that the juice from the chicken will also flavor the
    rutabago. I understand that it is just another kind of turnip. To
    be honest , when I bought it I thought it was a turnip but the cashier
    told me it was a rhutabago. I told her I sitll wanted it.

  7. #7
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:gvout3$kvn$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Robert of St Louis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    >> mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    >> and califlower.
    >>
    >> Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    >> popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    >> and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.
    >>
    >> A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.

    >
    > I thought Swedes were eggplant?




    No, swedes are large root vegetables, often called a turnip, but more
    correctly called a Rutabaga.

    --

    Evelyn

    The fool thinks he has won a battle when he bullies with harsh speech, but
    knowing how to be forbearing alone makes one victorious.
    Samyutta Nikaya I, 163


  8. #8
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    Robert of St Louis <[email protected]> wrote:
    : On May 29, 10:23?am, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    : > "Robert of St Louis" <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]...
    : > On May 29, 9:49 am, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    : > > "Robert of St Louis" <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote in
    : > > messagenews:[email protected]...
    : >
    : > > > The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    : > > > mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    : > > > and califlower.
    : >
    : > > > Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    : > > > popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    : > > > and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.
    : >
    : > > > A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.
    : >
    : > > I love them! If you mash them with a little splenda and butter they are
    : > > delicious.
    : >
    : >
    : > We eat them not because they are healthy, but because we like them. ? They
    : > are also good if you cut them into chunks, sprinkle with salt, pepper and
    : > garlic and oil, and bake them in a hot oven.
    : >
    : > My mother always would include a potato in the batch when she boiled them,
    : > because they would mash a little nicer.
    : >
    : > I almost always boil, then mash them with butter, milk, salt and pepper.
    : >
    : > Evelyn

    : I am sort of doing that right now. I chopped a half of one up...(they
    : are huge) chopped it up into small pieces like and apple. I seasoned
    : it, threw in some bell peppers, a little bit of tomato, then I put it
    : in the bottom of my crock pot. On top of that I placed one chicken
    : breast...hoping that the juice from the chicken will also flavor the
    : rutabago. I understand that it is just another kind of turnip. To
    : be honest , when I bought it I thought it was a turnip but the cashier
    : told me it was a rhutabago. I told her I sitll wanted it.

    Rutabegas are sometimes called turnips. My Mother called them that too.
    I, personally, don't like them, but that is just me. I do usse the white
    turnips with teh purple bottoms in stews, and soups in place of potatoes.
    Cuts the carbs adn the add a good taste, too.

    Your cooking experiment sounds like a good idea and the way to go as a
    dibetic.

    As far a bread goes, there are many lower carb varieties in the marke(not
    all at all markets). I get low carb pitas at about 8 grams of usable carbs
    (net of fiber) per pits, instead of the usual 30 or so. Both Arnold and
    Pepperidge make low carb breads that have 5 or 6 grams per slice and they
    are not he very light weight ones like the "light" breads. I also get
    wraps that are low carb6-8 per wrap or torillas that are similar. Thes
    can be very helpful in working out your meals. For exmple, you can make a
    sanwich but stuffign the pita with whatever filling you want an use it for
    a lunch or a picnic.

    ALL IS NOT LOST!

    Wendy

  9. #9
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    Julie Bove <[email protected]> wrote:

    : "Robert of St Louis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    : news:[email protected]...
    : > The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    : > mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    : > and califlower.
    : >
    : > Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    : > popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    : > and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.
    : >
    : > A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.

    : I thought Swedes were eggplant?

    Nope, they are those big orangy balls, usually with wax on them and hard a
    a rock. sometimtes called rutabegas , somtimes turnips and sometimes
    swedes. They keep forever, so were a stable during the winter before
    refrigeration came in.

    Wendy

  10. #10
    Evelyn Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    "Robert of St Louis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On May 29, 10:23 am, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > "Robert of St Louis" <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote in
    > messagenews:[email protected]...
    > On May 29, 9:49 am, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Robert of St Louis" <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote in
    > > messagenews:[email protected]...

    >
    > > > The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    > > > mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    > > > and califlower.

    >
    > > > Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    > > > popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    > > > and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.

    >
    > > > A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.

    >
    > > I love them! If you mash them with a little splenda and butter they are
    > > delicious.

    >
    > > --

    >
    > > Evelyn

    >
    > In other words...they are very very healthy?
    >
    > We eat them not because they are healthy, but because we like them. They
    > are also good if you cut them into chunks, sprinkle with salt, pepper and
    > garlic and oil, and bake them in a hot oven.
    >
    > My mother always would include a potato in the batch when she boiled them,
    > because they would mash a little nicer.
    >
    > I almost always boil, then mash them with butter, milk, salt and pepper.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Evelyn
    >
    > The fool thinks he has won a battle when he bullies with harsh speech, but
    > knowing how to be forbearing alone makes one victorious.
    > Samyutta Nikaya I, 163- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I am sort of doing that right now. I chopped a half of one up...(they
    are huge) chopped it up into small pieces like and apple. I seasoned
    it, threw in some bell peppers, a little bit of tomato, then I put it
    in the bottom of my crock pot. On top of that I placed one chicken
    breast...hoping that the juice from the chicken will also flavor the
    rutabago. I understand that it is just another kind of turnip. To
    be honest , when I bought it I thought it was a turnip but the cashier
    told me it was a rhutabago. I told her I sitll wanted it.



    **********

    Good for you. The juice from cooking them is really delicious. When I
    boil them I save the water to use in soup at a later date. They are rich
    and flavorful. Hubby likes to munch on them raw like a carrot.

    --

    Evelyn

    The fool thinks he has won a battle when he bullies with harsh speech, but
    knowing how to be forbearing alone makes one victorious.
    Samyutta Nikaya I, 163


  11. #11
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    Robert of St Louis wrote:
    > The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    > mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    > and califlower.
    >
    > Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    > popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    > and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.
    >
    > A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.
    >


    It also has 14.86 grams of carbohydrates. That's for cooked, drained and
    mashed without salt. If you like the flavor, it's a good substitute for
    mashed potato. Use cream, which doesn't have carbs, instead of milk when
    mashing them.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  12. #12
    Tiger Lily Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    Robert of St Louis wrote:
    > The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    > mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    > and califlower.
    >
    > Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    > popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    > and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.
    >
    > A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.
    >

    i love rutabaga

    dab of butter, touch of nutmeg, pinch of salt, and a grating of fresh
    black pepper

    yum!!!!!!!!!!

    kate

  13. #13
    Robert Miles Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    "Robert of St Louis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On May 29, 10:23 am, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > "Robert of St Louis" <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote in
    > messagenews:[email protected]...
    > On May 29, 9:49 am, "Evelyn" <evelyn.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Robert of St Louis" <free.tun...@gmail.com> wrote in
    > > messagenews:[email protected]...

    >

    [snip]
    ..
    I am sort of doing that right now. I chopped a half of one up...(they
    are huge) chopped it up into small pieces like and apple. I seasoned
    it, threw in some bell peppers, a little bit of tomato, then I put it
    in the bottom of my crock pot. On top of that I placed one chicken
    breast...hoping that the juice from the chicken will also flavor the
    rutabago. I understand that it is just another kind of turnip. To
    be honest , when I bought it I thought it was a turnip but the cashier
    told me it was a rhutabago. I told her I sitll wanted it.
    ..

    Robert of St Louis
    ---
    Here, the white and purple ones are called turnips, and the larger
    yellow and purple ones are called rutabegas. At least uncooked,
    they taste somewhat different.

    Robert Miles



  14. #14
    MÓckę« Guest

    Default Re: Am I getting desperate? RUTABAGA?

    On Fri, 29 May 2009 11:31:54 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Robert of St Louis wrote:
    >> The Cook's Fresh Market Web site describes rutabaga as a member of the
    >> mustard family, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips,
    >> and califlower.
    >>
    >> Sometimes this root vegetable is called "Swedes," a reference to its
    >> popularity among the Swedish. Rutabegas are rich in vitamins A and C
    >> and also contain potassium, calcium, iron, and niacin.
    >>
    >> A cup of rutabaga has only 50 calories.
    >>

    >
    >It also has 14.86 grams of carbohydrates. That's for cooked, drained and
    >mashed without salt. If you like the flavor, it's a good substitute for
    >mashed potato. Use cream, which doesn't have carbs, instead of milk when
    >mashing them.


    Is that 14.86 rounded to 15 grams of carbs as a cup of chopped or a
    cup of mashed rutabaga?


    --
    Mňckę« Deltec CoZmore Pumper
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