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Thread: Advice on a diet plan...

  1. #1
    micalhassi Guest

    Default Advice on a diet plan...


    Well i looked around on the net abit today. and saw the simmple steps i
    can take to start with. This is mostly managing how much i eat more than
    what i eat for the moment.

    eat 5 meals a day which include 3meals & 2 snacks.
    snack shouldn't be bigger than the size of your fist
    meat for meals shouldn't be bigger than the size of your palm.
    no eating 3 hours before bed, so that would be 8pm usally for me.
    i'm also starting to count cals again where i can.




    --
    micalhassi

  2. #2
    Robert Miles Guest

    Default Re: Advice on a diet plan...

    On Wednesday, May 16, 2012 12:21:04 AM UTC-5, micalhassi wrote:
    > Well i looked around on the net abit today. and saw the simmple steps i
    > can take to start with. This is mostly managing how much i eat more than
    > what i eat for the moment.
    >
    > eat 5 meals a day which include 3meals & 2 snacks.
    > snack shouldn't be bigger than the size of your fist
    > meat for meals shouldn't be bigger than the size of your palm.
    > no eating 3 hours before bed, so that would be 8pm usally for me.
    > i'm also starting to count cals again where i can.

    [snip]
    > micalhassi


    There are two main plans for losing weight - a low-fat diet and a low-carb-diet. Usually, a low-carb diet works best for those with type 2 diabetes (the type usually treated with pills instead of insulin). It's more uncomfortable at the start, but then it decreases your appetite and becomes easierto follow.

    For this diet, start out with no sugar and very little starchy foods. Onceyou decrease your blood glucose readings enough, you can SLOWLY start increasing the sugar and starchy foods, as long as your blood glucose readings stay low enough.

    The main reason for snacks is so that you don't get too hungry between meals, and can spread out the remaining starchy foods in your diet in order to limit their effect on your blood glucose readings.

    If someone gives you the advice that your brain needs a certain amount of carbohydrates in your diet, this is obsolete advice. Your liver can convertprotein into glucose fast enough to supply those portions of your brain that cannot switch to using ketones for energy. Your liver produces ketones from fat - either the fat in your diet or the fat you lose as you lose weight.

    Note that, for type 1 diabetes, you need to control the amount of ketones your liver produces - too much becomes toxic. For type 1, your liver does not automatically shut off ketone production when you have enough in your blood, once you're past a cetain level of glucose in your blood.

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